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Old 11-16-2006, 01:02 PM   #1
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18 Qt. Roaster question

Do you put water under the insert pan when using the roaster? Or do you use it dry? It seems to me that using the water will make the heat transfer faster and more evenly.
Thanks, Ed.

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Old 11-16-2006, 01:49 PM   #2
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What do your instructions say? If you don't have them, google for the name of your roaster and look there.
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Old 11-16-2006, 04:18 PM   #3
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I cannot find the directions. I went to the website and read about the cooker but could not find my answer.
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Old 11-16-2006, 04:57 PM   #4
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I presme this is for a turkey, and you don't want to steam it, but you could start with a bit of water.
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Old 11-16-2006, 06:03 PM   #5
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Idon't ever remember my mother doing that. here is one from a manual.

Electric Roaster Oven
This tabletop appliance serves as an extra oven for cooking a turkey or large roast. Generally, the cooking time and oven temperature setting are the same as for conventional cooking. Always check the roaster oven's use and care manual for the manufacturer's recommended temperature setting and time.

Preheat the oven to at least 325 °F. Place the turkey on the roaster oven rack or other meat rack so the turkey is raised out of the juices that collect in the bottom of the oven liner. Leave the lid on throughout cooking, removing it as little as possible to avoid slowing the cooking process.

Cooking bags can be used in the roaster oven as long as the bag does not touch the sides, bottom, or lid. Follow directions given by the cooking bag manufacturer, and use a food thermometer to be sure the temperature in the innermost part of the thigh and wing and the thickest part of the breast reaches the safe minimum internal temperature of 165 °F.
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Old 11-17-2006, 12:14 AM   #6
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I don't have an electric roaster, but I DO have the Rival BBQ Pit Countertop Slow Cooker.

And the instruction manual says to make sure that there IS a little water at the bottom of the crock pan, so it wouldn't hurt at all.

Besides, it helps prevent any grease from smoking or burning!
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Old 11-17-2006, 05:22 AM   #7
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The other night at a soup supper we put on for the local marching band some of the cooks there said that I should put some water in the roaster before I put in the pan that you put the soup in.

In other words water to transfer the heat from the roaster to the cooking pan. Sort of like a double boiler.
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Old 11-17-2006, 08:47 AM   #8
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You put water in the unit under the pan?! Isn't that dangerous? You could get electrocuted from doing that!!
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Old 11-17-2006, 09:38 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
You put water in the unit under the pan?! Isn't that dangerous? You could get electrocuted from doing that!!
It's an insert into a closed unit. NOt a problem--nothing exposed.
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Old 11-17-2006, 09:50 AM   #10
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As long as it's in the insert.
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Old 11-17-2006, 11:54 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey123
As long as it's in the insert.
These roasters do not have any electrical coils exposed--not like some deep fryers that do. It is a metal cabinet with the coils enclosed inside. Then there is an insert that goes into this where you put the food. The question is whether to put water in the metal cabinet unit and then put the insert in.
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Old 11-17-2006, 01:02 PM   #12
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No!!!

Unless you are absolutely possitively certain that the water being there won't cause electrical problems such as a short circuit or electrocution.

Incidently, most electrical appliances that cook and "roast" food, such as slow cookers, skillets and muli-cookers have their heating elements embedded inside the cooker's shell.

Ovens, toasters and rotisseries have the elements exposed and they turn a bright orange-red indicating nice dry heat for baking and roasting.
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Old 11-17-2006, 01:05 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by etillema
Do you put water under the insert pan when using the roaster? Or do you use it dry? It seems to me that using the water will make the heat transfer faster and more evenly.
Thanks, Ed.
Isn't this supposed to be like a second oven? You wouldn't put water in your oven to roast, so I would skip it in the roaster as well.
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Old 11-17-2006, 01:22 PM   #14
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The instruction manuals that came with my George Jr. Rotisserie, Thane Flavor Wave Convection Oven and my Rival BBQ Pit strongly suggest that a little bit of water be placed at the bottom of the pans to prevent the smoking and or burning of any fat that drips from the meat and collects in the pans.

Trust me, you don't want your dinner to go up in smoke - that is unless you are planning to do some major rennovating in your kitchen, as Emeril always says!!
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Old 11-17-2006, 01:28 PM   #15
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Thanks, Corey. I stand corrected.
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Old 11-17-2006, 01:33 PM   #16
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Corey, this is NOT a rotisserie. It is an appliance like a Nesco roaster oven--you might or might not put water in it. The pans you have in yours would be like putting a cookie sheet under a roasting chicken in my oven--to catch grease and keep it from burning on the bottom of the oven, for example (horrors to that!!). This thing looks like a great big roasting pan with a domed lid. It BAKES (called roasting when done to meat, I guess).

I can't post a picture. This is what I believe is being talked about. If not, then....
http://www.everythingkitchens.com/ne...n-4808-14.html
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Old 11-17-2006, 01:39 PM   #17
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I know.

The whole big porcelain-on-steel pan lifts out for easy cleaning. My mom had one for many years. The best thing to do at this point is to read the manual and find out if you can do that.

No problem, Andy. Always glad to try to help you out.
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Old 11-17-2006, 03:00 PM   #18
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I have a 18 qt. Aroma Roaster Oven. It says IMPORTANT: NEVER place food or liquid directly into the oven body. You put it into the cooking pan that goes into the oven body. I hope this is what you are asking about.
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Old 11-18-2006, 10:41 PM   #19
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I was in Target this afternoon to buy a few outfits.

I went over and broused in the small appliance section, looking at the new Rival Roasters. One is the traditional oblong shape and the other is in the oval shape.

Both models have the benefits of letting you choose between using the stationary pan that's non-removable, or the one that can be removed!! Both have the buffet tray with three small pans for keeping foods hot. And both have a meat rack for lifting the roast out of the cooker.
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Old 11-20-2006, 10:45 AM   #20
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Can you use these roaster ovens to heat casseroles in a casserole dish? there is a removable rack in the roaster to set the casserole on.
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