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Old 09-20-2014, 04:37 PM   #1
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Pyrex - how long should it last?

I have noticed that the edge of one of my Pyrex measuring jugs is starting to chip away at quite a rate just lately.

Now in fairness, this jug is over 30 years old so it has been pretty hard-wearing up to now. I must have cracked many an egg on those edges over the years too. Is that what has caused the damage?

I have an identical Pyrex measuring jug that is "only" about 15 years old and it is still perfect.

I had a notion that unless you actually dropped Pyrex and smashed it to pieces, it would last indefinitely. (Though I found a thread on here about exploding Pyrex which was quite alarming!)

I suppose I should throw the chipped jug out?

Should I stop cracking eggs on the edge of the other one? Or is there anything else that could have caused the chipping? (I don't bash spoons or anything else on the edges.)

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Old 09-20-2014, 04:45 PM   #2
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As far as I know, Pyrex will last indefinitely. I have some pieces that are easily 50+ years old. I know because I've had them most of their lives. I've been cooking for over 57 years and some of my Pyrex things are at least that old.

The edges of any glass/china can chip over time, even with the most careful use. They get shuffled in the cabinet and the dishwasher gives them a good go. Perhaps you didn't bash any spoons on the edge of the jug but someone else could have. Are you the only person to use it? Not everyone is as careful or gentle as we are.

I don't think I'd worry about your measuring jug. If the scratchy edge bothers you, buff it smoother with a diamond knife sharpening stone. I've done that with several of our glass pieces and brought the uneven edge back to a more normal smoothness.
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Old 09-20-2014, 04:48 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
I have noticed that the edge of one of my Pyrex measuring jugs is starting to chip away at quite a rate just lately.

Now in fairness, this jug is over 30 years old so it has been pretty hard-wearing up to now. I must have cracked many an egg on those edges over the years too. Is that what has caused the damage?

I have an identical Pyrex measuring jug that is "only" about 15 years old and it is still perfect.

I had a notion that unless you actually dropped Pyrex and smashed it to pieces, it would last indefinitely. (Though I found a thread on here about exploding Pyrex which was quite alarming!)

I suppose I should throw the chipped jug out?

Should I stop cracking eggs on the edge of the other one? Or is there anything else that could have caused the chipping? (I don't bash spoons or anything else on the edges.)

Sounds like it is on its last leg. And yes, stop cracking eggs on the edge. You should crack them on a flat surface. When you crack them on the edge of a vessels, you are pushing the egg shell into the egg.
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Old 09-20-2014, 04:54 PM   #4
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Okay, so no more cracking eggs on the edge! Duly noted Addie!

And I am glad to know I can keep using the jug. It's perfectly good and I am only concerned in case it was likely to degrade and leave chips of glass in the food. I'm not bothered about how it looks.

By the way Katie, no, it's just me that has used it. (I apparently surround myself with people who don't cook!) I'm just surprised because these chips have only started to occur within the past year or so.
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Old 09-20-2014, 04:58 PM   #5
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I have 4 Pyrex jugs, 2 of them have chips on the edge. I don't crack anything on them, just figured the dishwasher or DH did something. I still use all of them.
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Old 09-20-2014, 05:09 PM   #6
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I have 4 Pyrex jugs, 2 of them have chips on the edge. I don't crack anything on them, just figured the dishwasher or DH did something. I still use all of them.
Good to know! I am reassured I can continue to use it now. (I was wondering if I was just being a cheapskate by not wanting to buy a new one!)
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Old 09-20-2014, 05:16 PM   #7
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Good to know! I am reassured I can continue to use it now. (I was wondering if I was just being a cheapskate by not wanting to buy a new one!)
I prefer to think of it as frugal I don't think cracking eggs on the edge caused the chipping, since glass is much harder than eggshells, but Addie is right - you don't want to inadvertently introduce bacteria into the egg by pushing the eggshell into it.
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Old 09-20-2014, 05:34 PM   #8
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I prefer to think of it as frugal I don't think cracking eggs on the edge caused the chipping, since glass is much harder than eggshells, but Addie is right - you don't want to inadvertently introduce bacteria into the egg by pushing the eggshell into it.
Blimey! I hadn't even thought of that! I have been getting truly free range fresh eggs for the past year from a colleague at work. These eggs are marvellous (all sorts of sizes and shell colours but all with the most amazing yolks and flavour.) But literally fresh from the hens to my plate.

At the risk of getting moved to another thread, how do you crack an egg - even on a flat surface - without potentially introducing bacteria from the outside of the shell?
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Old 09-20-2014, 06:17 PM   #9
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I would use it in my kitchen.

If it worries you toss it!

Life is too short to worry about things like this!

Look at it as an opportunity to go shopping!
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Old 09-20-2014, 10:31 PM   #10
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Those aren't chips Katy, they are battle wounds. Badges of honor, so to speak. I got my Pyrex measuring cup as a wedding shower gift. Himself and I will be married 40 years this November. We haven't died yet, and mine has been chipped for years.


When you guys talk about "cracking the egg flat on the counter" I trust you are referring to cooked eggs? I can't imagine doing it that way to crack a raw egg. I usually cradle a raw egg in my palm and crack into it with the spine of my paring knife. I don't see a problem with getting bits of shell into the egg, but then again I'm buying eggs in the U.S. The U.S. requires any commercially-sold eggs be washed and sanitized. Even brown ones, which are produced much closer to point-of-sale. If I'm lucky enough to find farm-fresh eggs, I do wash those before doing anything else with them.
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Old 09-20-2014, 10:47 PM   #11
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Those aren't chips Katy, they are battle wounds. Badges of honor, so to speak. I got my Pyrex measuring cup as a wedding shower gift. Himself and I will be married 40 years this November. We haven't died yet, and mine has been chipped for years.

When you guys talk about "cracking the egg flat on the counter" I trust you are referring to cooked eggs? I can't imagine doing it that way to crack a raw egg. I usually cradle a raw egg in my palm and crack into it with the spine of my paring knife. I don't see a problem with getting bits of shell into the egg, but then again I'm buying eggs in the U.S. The U.S. requires any commercially-sold eggs be washed and sanitized. Even brown ones, which are produced much closer to point-of-sale. If I'm lucky enough to find farm-fresh eggs, I do wash those before doing anything else with them.
I didn't get it either. Apparently, if you crack the raw egg on a flat surface, you're insured that no shell bit creeps in, and you don't break the yolk. Have seen several cooking shows that advocate it.
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Old 09-20-2014, 10:48 PM   #12
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yes, with raw eggs. i don't bother to do it, but there is a miniscule chance that some horribly infected shell will get into the egg if you break it on an angled surface like the edge of a bowl or pot. if you tap it on something like a flat counter, the little membrane just inside the shell should keep the bits together as you apply a little torgue to seperate the halves.

i'm going to have to try to think of something less to worry about.

to be less cynical, crack your eggs into a darkly coloured bowl before adding to any recipe. that way you can see if bits of shell got loose.
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Old 09-20-2014, 11:12 PM   #13
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I figure I've made it to 63 with no real medical issue. Been hospitalized once. To have two kids. The only time I've done something efficiently. I've broken so many of these "OMG DON'T DO THIS!" rules I should have died years ago. I'm not careless, I'm not reckless, but I'm not paranoid either. I look at it as building up immunities.
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Old 09-20-2014, 11:18 PM   #14
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i think you, me, and the chief are related.

i've just kinda lived my life. no big problems.
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Old 09-21-2014, 12:14 AM   #15
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My mother always cracked them on a flat surface, so I have always done so too. And if I have to use three or more eggs for a recipe, I break them into a separate bowl first in case one may not be good. I once broke one open with a half formed chick in it. Took me months to get over that one. Couldn't look at an egg.

When we lived on the farm, we always washed them with the hose before we brought them into the house. Except in the winter. But then there were very few eggs.
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Old 09-21-2014, 06:41 AM   #16
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It will last until you drop it on the tile floor or do something stupid like set it on a hot burner!
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Old 09-21-2014, 10:31 AM   #17
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Pyrex ain't what it used to be

Pyrex used to be made from borosilicate glass. When they sold the brand the new owners changed the glass formulation to something not as robust. The old Pyrex was extremely resilient to sudden heat changes and would almost never shatter when going from hot to sudden cold. The newer Pyrex, not so much.
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Old 09-21-2014, 10:49 AM   #18
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Those aren't chips Katy, they are battle wounds. Badges of honor, so to speak. I got my Pyrex measuring cup as a wedding shower gift. Himself and I will be married 40 years this November. We haven't died yet, and mine has been chipped for years.


When you guys talk about "cracking the egg flat on the counter" I trust you are referring to cooked eggs? I can't imagine doing it that way to crack a raw egg. I usually cradle a raw egg in my palm and crack into it with the spine of my paring knife. I don't see a problem with getting bits of shell into the egg, but then again I'm buying eggs in the U.S. The U.S. requires any commercially-sold eggs be washed and sanitized. Even brown ones, which are produced much closer to point-of-sale. If I'm lucky enough to find farm-fresh eggs, I do wash those before doing anything else with them.
I don't get it either, if I crack on a flat surface, then nine times out of ten, I have to wipe down that surface because there is egg on it. If I tap it on the counter too lightly it doesn't crack enough and I have to break it with my thumbnail, which pretty much simulates cracking on the side of a bowl. If I hit it too hard then it gets onto the counter. I'm much more successful with the one handed crack on the side of a bowl or Pyrex measuring cup (see how I'm keeping the comment on subject )
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Old 09-21-2014, 10:51 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by KatyCooks View Post
I have noticed that the edge of one of my Pyrex measuring jugs is starting to chip away at quite a rate just lately.

Now in fairness, this jug is over 30 years old so it has been pretty hard-wearing up to now. I must have cracked many an egg on those edges over the years too. Is that what has caused the damage?

I have an identical Pyrex measuring jug that is "only" about 15 years old and it is still perfect.

I had a notion that unless you actually dropped Pyrex and smashed it to pieces, it would last indefinitely. (Though I found a thread on here about exploding Pyrex which was quite alarming!)

I suppose I should throw the chipped jug out?

Should I stop cracking eggs on the edge of the other one? Or is there anything else that could have caused the chipping? (I don't bash spoons or anything else on the edges.)
Even with Pyrex the rims are vulnerable to chipping when knocked in the washing up bowl or even in the DW. Storing them upside down can cause chipping, too. I've found that the edge of the pouring lip is particularly vulnerable.

It might be a good idea to stop cracking your eggs on the edge even though I've never experienced damage from doing that.

The advantage of glass over ceramic is that glass doesn't absorb liquid or bacteria so doesn't transfer to the next thing you use the jug for and there isn't hygiene issue as long as you wash it well.

I've got some very old stuff that belonged to my grandmother and some is chewed on the edges and some isn't. The roll of the dice really, imo.
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Old 09-21-2014, 10:52 AM   #20
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I've definitely seen some Pyrex chip and some go years and years and still look new. I wonder if there were some years that were better than others? I know that vintage Pyrex is superior to today's stuff, but not even that was perfect.

I have a Marinex glass measure that is made of Borosilicate glass and seems to be tough as nails.
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