Any way to make radishes tasty?

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NO nothing will make them very good tasting, like chocolate or anything like that. ;)

Two interesting ways, one is to cook them, steam or saute and the hotness subsides somewhat.
In a peanut butter and radish sandwich, the peanut butter cuts the hotness back and is nice and creamy against the crunchy radish.
 
Im a vegetarian and a gardener who grows radishes , and they are horrible. If I slice them very very thin ( and I mean very very thin) , I don't mind them in a salad. I have tried a half dozen ways to use them, each worse than the next. My daughter (either baking for frying them, I forget ) with butter.

Why do I grow them, you may ask? :
1) They are one of the first crops to be planted of the year ( they tolerate cool spring conditions), so it gives me a reason to get dirty after hibernating for the winter.
2) They are one of the quickest growing crops, from seed to harvest ( 4 - 6 weeks-ish). They are in and out before I start the good tasting stuff.
3) Ironically , they are one of my most successful crops by amount and quality, so it gives me that well needed 'boost' of confidence early on in the growing season. I keep a few for salads and bring the rest to work to give away.

***I grow red ones and purple ones. They taste the same, like crap!***
 

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@larry_stewart, you are so funny!

I prefer them sauteed/pan fried. I cut them in half, lay the cut side down onto melted butter, put a tablespoon of water (or white wine) in the pan, cover, and simmer on low for about 8-10 minutes. Then I take the cover off, toss them around a bit, turn the heat up a little, and finish cooking them until tender. The "hot" goes away and they taste good.

I also like to get a fresh baguette, get a thinnish slice, put some good quality butter on the bread, cover the butter with very very thin radish slices, and sprinkle with your best finishing salt. Voila, a French Radish sandwich.
 
I like radishes. Raw. I once tried cooking them but found they weren't worth the trouble. No taste, no crunch - why bother?

but I do not like the leaves, my mom did but they are too bitter for me. I do like the microgreens of almost anything. Mustard, brussels, radish, all of those things. Usually only bean are available but the others I get when I see them.
 
Im a vegetarian and a gardener who grows radishes , and they are horrible. If I slice them very very thin ( and I mean very very thin) , I don't mind them in a salad. I have tried a half dozen ways to use them, each worse than the next. My daughter (either baking for frying them, I forget ) with butter.

Why do I grow them, you may ask? :
1) They are one of the first crops to be planted of the year ( they tolerate cool spring conditions), so it gives me a reason to get dirty after hibernating for the winter.
2) They are one of the quickest growing crops, from seed to harvest ( 4 - 6 weeks-ish). They are in and out before I start the good tasting stuff.
3) Ironically , they are one of my most successful crops by amount and quality, so it gives me that well needed 'boost' of confidence early on in the growing season. I keep a few for salads and bring the rest to work to give away.

***I grow red ones and purple ones. They taste the same, like crap!***

Imagine if the ONLY thing you could successfully grow was radishes. Wouldn't that suck. :ROFLMAO: That would definitely end my interest in gardening.

CD
 
Soak them in salt water and put them in the fridge. That is how my mom used to instruct us to make them.
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I like radishes. Raw. I once tried cooking them but found they weren't worth the trouble. No taste, no crunch - why bother?
That's how I feel about cooked radishes. The best thing, to me, about radishes is the bite/heat. I have been very disappointed in radishes from the supermarket on occasion - no heat. I haven't had the problem with radishes from the health food store or from Lufa Farms (the place that supplies my produce baskets).

I like them thinly sliced in a salad. I like to take smallish bites out of a raw radish and dip the bitten end in a bit of coarse salt. Regular table salt works too, but doesn't seem as fun.
 
Funny thing is, my brother who doesnt like anything remotely vegetable, likes radish.
I like most veges, but I don't like radish.,
 
we often do "raw vegetable" side for dinner - all the usual - carrot / celery / cukes / scallions / broccoli / cauliflower / . . . and the common 'red radish'

eat them in salad as well -

seems to be a thing like cilantro - either you like them or you don't - no reasons required . . .
 
we often do "raw vegetable" side for dinner - all the usual - carrot / celery / cukes / scallions / broccoli / cauliflower / . . . and the common 'red radish'

eat them in salad as well -

seems to be a thing like cilantro - either you like them or you don't - no reasons required . . .

I don't like radishes OR carrots. Not crazy about cucumbers.

The cilantro thing is not a personal taste issue, it is a genetic trait (that I have) that reacts to one chemical in cilantro. That chemical seems to be neutralized by acids, so I can finely chop cilantro and put it in my salsa with the tomatoes and vinegar, and love what it adds.

As for radishes, I have not found any way to use them that I like.

CD
 
I've never liked radishes. But one way I did decide to try them was roasted in the oven and they weren't bad at all. The only thing I didn't use in the following recipe was the lemon juice. Just tossed them in the oil and salt & pepper and roasted them until they were crisp-tender.

Ingredients​

Instructions​

  • Preheat the oven to 450°F. Slice the radishes in half and place them in a roasting dish (or on a baking sheet with parchment paper). Toss with drizzles of olive oil and pinches of salt and pepper and place cut-side down.
  • Roast 10 to 15 minutes or until they reach your desired doneness. I like my radishes to have a bit of a crunchy bite. If you prefer softer radishes, roast them longer.
  • Serve with squeezes of lemon and season to taste.
 

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