Chef's who tell you the science

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taxlady

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I can think of several chefs who often explain the science of the cooking methods and techniques they use.

Alton Brown was probably the first chef I saw do this.
J. Kenji López-Alt
And two chefs from America's Test Kitchen who I have seen from time to time and have started following on YouTube: Lan Lam and Dan Souza who is the host of "What's Eating Dan?"

Who am I forgetting or haven't heard of yet?

I recently watched a video on the YouTube channel, "Techniquely with Lan Lam" on knife skills. I have already seen a benefit in using some of her techniques.


And here's a link to a bunch of "What's Eating Dan?" videos:
 
My favorite of ever is Alton Brown. His explanations of the hows and whys of food chemistry are so clear and understandable I love them.

As a matter of fact I made an omelette under his direction this morning and it was the best omelette I have ever made. Teach, teach, teach. Learn, learn, learn...even at 74 years old.
 
They're not really active right now but here are a few references:
  • Shirley Corriher is a food chemist who wrote two books: FoodWise about cooking and BakeWise about baking. She was a guest expert on Good Eats sometimes.
  • Harold McGee
  • There's a third I can't remember 😁 I'll be back if I think of the name.
 
They're not really active right now but here are a few references:
  • Shirley Corriher is a food chemist who wrote two books: FoodWise about cooking and BakeWise about baking. She was a guest expert on Good Eats sometimes.
  • Harold McGee
  • There's a third I can't remember 😁 I'll be back if I think of the name.
Robert Wolke?

Harold McGee is not a chef but he’s the pre-eminent authority on food science. Everyone should read his book “On Food and Cooking”

None of the smart folks discussed here are practicing chefs. But someone who is a practicing chef and will teach you a lot about food science is David Chang of Momofuko fame. Look up his amazing videos or his tv show.
 
Many, many years ago, I wanted to create a class called "Kitchen Chemistry" for the school. My thought was that it would make chemistry more tangible for the standard student. I still think it would make a fantastic class.
 
Robert Wolke?

Harold McGee is not a chef but he’s the pre-eminent authority on food science. Everyone should read his book “On Food and Cooking”

None of the smart folks discussed here are practicing chefs. But someone who is a practicing chef and will teach you a lot about food science is David Chang of Momofuko fame. Look up his amazing videos or his tv show.
Nathan Myhrvold! As you probably know, he co-wrote a crazy expensive series of books on the chemistry of cooking called Modernist Cuisine. He followed it up with other interesting books, including two on the photography of the others. Very cool 😎
 
Nathan Myhrvold! As you probably know, he co-wrote a crazy expensive series of books on the chemistry of cooking called Modernist Cuisine. He followed it up with other interesting books, including two on the photography of the others. Very cool 😎
I have Modernist Cuisine. Interesting but very challenging. I’ve tried some easy stuff like the caviar thingie.
 
Many, many years ago, I wanted to create a class called "Kitchen Chemistry" for the school. My thought was that it would make chemistry more tangible for the standard student. I still think it would make a fantastic class.
The American Association of Chemistry Teachers offers educational materials using cooking examples in chemistry class.

Kitchen Chemistry - High School
 

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