English Muffins

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I try to buy #300 lemons (which are the smaller ones) when shopping for testing recipes. For stuff I cook at home, I shoot for a 6 oz. lemon because I know there are 2 Tbsp of juice and you get 1 Tbsp of zest.


An average head of garlic has 8 cloves. Of course, that's if I use my "Mexican lime squeezer" and not a reamer. Love my Mexican lime squeezer. Lemons (and limes) are something I always have in my house. So if I need more lemon juice, I just add more. I freeze lemon and lime juice when I get them on sale. Ditto for the zest.
 
I get recipes at a Danish cooking site. They have recipes that call for "a bunch of parsley" or "a lemon" or "an egg". But, if you hover your mouse over the ingredient, it tells you how many grams or ml. Here's an example. I was hovering the cursor over "Maizena majsstivelse" (corn starch).
 

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TL--can you post the link? I can't always find what I need for herbs. I do know an average bunch of coriander has 93 sprigs <g>.
 
TL--can you post the link? I can't always find what I need for herbs. I do know an average bunch of coriander has 93 sprigs <g>.
Sure, but you will have to look at individual recipes to see it. It will be Danish standards/averages. I assume you mean to the site, not to that particular recipe.

Opskrifter/Madopskrifter Alletiders Kogebog
 
Then we come to the recipes that call for something like the juice of one lemon. One lemon? How big? How juicy? :wacko:

This is a pet peeve of mine. Also, garlic cloves, onions, bunches of parsley. They all vary quite a but.

All plans I get to build something carry the disclaimer "verify in field".

That sorta coincides with the "to taste" found in recipe's.

[Blueprints/Recipe's] are the responsibility of the [builder/cook] and this is why you should [measure/taste] often while constructing the [project/meal]. Variations in the [field/kitchen] as to [dimensions/size] of [materials/ingredients] only cause the [builder/cook] to be on there toes to assure the outcome is satisfactory to the end consumer. :rolleyes:
 
All plans I get to build something carry the disclaimer "verify in field".

That sorta coincides with the "to taste" found in recipe's.

[Blueprints/Recipe's] are the responsibility of the [builder/cook] and this is why you should [measure/taste] often while constructing the [project/meal]. Variations in the [field/kitchen] as to [dimensions/size] of [materials/ingredients] only cause the [builder/cook] to be on there toes to assure the outcome is satisfactory to the end consumer. :rolleyes:

That's basically saying, "I'm not responsible for any mistakes I made. You're on your own".

The recipe writer has a responsibility to provide an unambiguous recipe as a blueprint for the dish. This responsibility does not absolve the cooks from tasting as they go.

Tell me I should use 1/2 cup of diced onion or 2 tsp of minced garlic to make the recipe the way you intended. Then it's up to me to add more or less according to m own tastes.
 
That's basically saying, "I'm not responsible for any mistakes I made. You're on your own".

The recipe writer has a responsibility to provide an unambiguous recipe as a blueprint for the dish. This responsibility does not absolve the cooks from tasting as they go.

Tell me I should use 1/2 cup of diced onion or 2 tsp of minced garlic to make the recipe the way you intended. Then it's up to me to add more or less according to m own tastes.

That pretty much sums it up.

The Architect makes a mistake then unless the builder catches it before he/she carries through creation without verifying specifics with the "creator" then it falls on the person who did the deed. :(

Disclaimers are a bitch. :ermm:

But verify in the field/to taste are there for a reason.
 
That pretty much sums it up.

The Architect makes a mistake then unless the builder catches it before he/she carries through creation without verifying specifics with the "creator" then it falls on the person who did the deed. :(

Disclaimers are a bitch. :ermm:

But verify in the field/to taste are there for a reason.

Your analogy to architects and contractors doesn't really relate to cooking. In the building trade, you have professionals dealing with professionals. With cooking, you have professionals and amateurs dealing with mostly amateurs. There are varying skill and knowledge levels on both sides of the equation that really makes an internet recipe a potential recipe for disaster.
 
Your analogy to architects and contractors doesn't really relate to cooking. In the building trade, you have professionals dealing with professionals. With cooking, you have professionals and amateurs dealing with mostly dealing with . There are varying skill and knowledge levels on both sides of the equation that really makes an internet recipe a potential recipe for disaster.

Oh that's not true at all. If you think it's professionals dealing with professionals and not professionals dealing with amateurs then you need to look at the subcontractors the "professionals" hire and how they need to repair the "work" some of them do.

I only see my analogy relating to cooking as it sees the final product dependent on the [chief/contractors] ability to see what the desired outcome of the finished product is to be in the eye of the final consumer.

Wasn't it Frank Perdue that said "Parts is parts". ;)


Now let's relate this to English Muffins. :LOL:
 
With the exception of baking, most of the T&T recipes from our members I see posted here that involve citrus juice, onions, bell peppers, garlic, etc., use guidelines such as "3 cloves of garlic, minced....half a bell pepper, chopped....half a small onion, chopped....juice of one lemon...", etc.

IMHO, the recipes in cookbooks and online are meant to be starting points and guidelines. New cooks will try the recipes and if so inclined, they'll adapt them when they try them again. More experienced cooks will know what ingredients to adapt before they make them.

I see Zagut's analogy here. :)


Edited....slow typing here....saw Zagut's reply after I hit submit...lol
 
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...IMHO, the recipes in cookbooks and online are meant to be starting points and guidelines. New cooks will try the recipes and if so inclined, they'll adapt them when they try them again. More experienced cooks will know what ingredients to adapt before they make them...

I think most recipes are not meant as starting points at all. I think the average non-foodie follows a recipe exactly and is very hesitant to change it for fear of making a mess of things. The same recipe can be a starting point to you or me. The author of a recipe or cookbook doesn't control who buy his book or downloads his recipe. They have to ensure as much as possible that the newest cook can make the recipe successfully.

My comments on the imprecise nature of of some measures are due to my OCDness. In most recipes, though "a small onion" can vary in size, it's probably not an issue in a recipe.
 
I think most recipes are not meant as starting points at all. I think the average non-foodie follows a recipe exactly and is very hesitant to change it for fear of making a mess of things. The same recipe can be a starting point to you or me. The author of a recipe or cookbook doesn't control who buy his book or downloads his recipe. They have to ensure as much as possible that the newest cook can make the recipe successfully.

My comments on the imprecise nature of of some measures are due to my OCDness. In most recipes, though "a small onion" can vary in size, it's probably not an issue in a recipe.

:LOL: I hear ya there...my little grandson was here today...excuse me for a moment while I put the coasters and coffee table books back where they are supposed to be. :ROFLMAO:
 
My comments on the imprecise nature of of some measures are due to my OCDness. In most recipes, though "a small onion" can vary in size, it's probably not an issue in a recipe.
Just like eggs are graded for size, so are fruits and most veggies. Unfortunately, unless you are involved with ordering food for the food industry from a wholesaler, the average consumer is not exposed to those grades, unlike with eggs.

The size for fruits is based on how many fit in the box. The boxes are sized to hold a certain weight. Veggies are the same. For example, if you want to buy a box of cauliflower (sorry, I don't have the weight per cauliflower or the # re: size), 24 fit in a box. Those 24 heads of cauliflower will be almost all the same size. The off-size ones are sold in another sized box. 20 Avocadoes fit in a box, 20 Anjou pears fit in the same sized box, 18 Afaulto mangos fit in a "crate." How do I know this? I buy produce by the box every week for approximately 100 servings and I buy these at the local produce market. I need the produce to be as uniform in size as possible.


When you buy from a farmer's market or at the farmgate, you are not going to be subjected to grading. My rule of thumb for onions, for example, is that a "small" onion is about the size of a golf ball, medium fits in my palm with my fingers curled halfway up, large is the size of a baseball (and feels like that in my hand!). I use this "standard" of measure when grading tomatoes, potatoes, beets, and other such things from the garden.
 
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Just like eggs are graded for size, so are fruits and most veggies.

...My rule of thumb for onions, for example, is that a "small" onion is about the size of a golf ball, medium fits in my palm with my fingers curled halfway up, large is the size of a baseball (and feels like that in my hand!). I use this "standard" of measure when grading tomatoes, potatoes, beets, and other such things from the garden.


Egg size is standardized. There are specifications for large, extra large, etc. egg sizes. So when a recipe calls for large eggs, you can go to the market and buy large eggs. It says so right there on the carton. No confusion.

Your "standard" for veggies is fine for you but not useful in a written recipe. I can hold a baseball sized onion in my hand and have my fingers curl half way up so that would be a medium onion for me.

The only precise way for recipes would be to measure veggies by weight.
 
Since I don buy eggs, Andy, I do have to weigh them. My girls are not consistent when they lay eggs. The width of my hand is the perfect size to measure (across) for a 5 oz. portion of meat or fish. The sizes given, golf ball, medium is about the size of a tennis ball, large is the size of a baseball. Doesn't matter the size of a person's hand, if one can adjust to how a golf ball, tennis ball, or baseball fits in one's hand.
 
Lot's of Danish recipes say stuff like: 200 grams of onions, peeled weight, or 1000 grams of potatoes, peeled weight.
 
Since I don buy eggs, Andy, I do have to weigh them. My girls are not consistent when they lay eggs. The width of my hand is the perfect size to measure (across) for a 5 oz. portion of meat or fish. The sizes given, golf ball, medium is about the size of a tennis ball, large is the size of a baseball. Doesn't matter the size of a person's hand, if one can adjust to how a golf ball, tennis ball, or baseball fits in one's hand.

For me, the whole point of this discussion is the need for standardized and accurate ingredient quantities. What fits into your or my hand is immaterial to that discussion. I also find comparisons to things like different balls is handy but not universal. No one in Europe, for example, would be familiar with the size of a baseball.
 
For me, the whole point of this discussion is the need for standardized and accurate ingredient quantities. What fits into your or my hand is immaterial to that discussion. I also find comparisons to things like different balls is handy but not universal. No one in Europe, for example, would be familiar with the size of a baseball.
Standardization is nice, but things don't grow that way. When in the supermarket, a person needs an easy way to measure something--whether it is by using the scale (if there is one) or something easy, one's hand. We used to measure fabric by stretching out an arm and bringing the fabric up to our noses to determine if there were enough yards left on a bolt. That "measurement" was approximately one yard. I still do that.


I think the European Confederation of Baseball players, its fans, the youngsters aspiring to be ball players and their parents would take offence to that assumption. The federation has been around since the late '60s/early '70s.
 
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I wouldn't have a clue about baseball or how big the ball is its not a UK interest . We play rounders and footy .



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