Fats/Oil - How much am I really eating?

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Beginning2Cook

Assistant Cook
Joined
Aug 29, 2022
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5
Location
Auckland
Hi there,

If I cook something that requires me to cook onions in 1 x tbsp of oil and then to use another 1 x tbsp of oil to cook meat, does this mean that when I eat the meal, I am eating at least 2 x tbsp of fat? Not to mention all the fat that is in the meat?

The answer might seem obvious, but I was wondering if the process of cooking might convert a lot of the oil/fat into some other substance.

Alternatively, it occurred to me that maybe oil/fat isn't actually 100% oil/fat so I am not eating as much as I think.
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
26,925
Location
Southeastern Virginia
Cooking doesn't turn oils or fats into something else, but you're probably not eating all the fat you're using when you sauté or pan-fry. Some of it is left in the pan, unless you make a pan sauce. Oils and fats that are used for cooking are usually 100 percent fat, except for butter, which is about 20 percent water.
 
Last edited:

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
7,513
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
You also need to consider how many servings are being made. Servings of 2 or 4 need to divide your totals with that. Plus as GG mentioned, some is left in the pan, some is left on the plate.

and besides.... not all fat is bad for you.
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
Messages
49,583
Location
Massachusetts
Next time you cook something similar to what you described, Measure the fat left in the pan.
 

cookiecrafter

Senior Cook
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
200
Location
Chicago
Vitamins are water soluable and minerals are oil soluable. You have to have some fats in your diet to make things work like protien. calcuim, ...etc.
 

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
26,925
Location
Southeastern Virginia
Vitamins are water soluable and minerals are oil soluable. You have to have some fats in your diet to make things work like protien. calcuim, ...etc.

Not quite. Vitamins A, D, E and K are fat-soluble. Salt is a mineral that's water-soluble. You have the right idea but you may want to get a refresher on the details.
 

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