Favorite Helpful Kitchen Hints

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norgeskog

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What is your favorite or most helpful kitchen hint or problem that needs solving????

Mine is an ongoing problem in the kitchen is keeping the wooden cuttingboard bacteria/germ free. My wooden cuttingboard is only used to vegetables, bread, etc. I clean it regularly with white vinegar and a paper towel. I have a plastic flexible cutting board that I use over the wooden one when I prepare meat. That one I scrub with hot water, dish soap and white vinegar. What do you use for these. I also wipe my kitchen counters weekly with straight white vinegar (suggeston from my vinegar helpful household remedy book) but then my kitchen smells like a salad for a day.


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Juliev

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I also have a plastic cutting board that I used a lot. When I cut chicken, fish etc on it.. I wash it in soapy water with vinegar added.. or alittle bleach... I wash it off really well, after using the bleach..

I use a lot of garlic and onion.... I use lemon juice on my fingers or running my hands along something that is stainless steel..that works really well to get rid of the odor.
 

masteraznchefjr

Sous Chef
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to clean a very oily pan just use the scraps from your vegetable like peels to wipe it down and wash it works pretty well
 

MJ

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I always like to make sure my fire extinguisher is fully charged :shock:
 

cafeandy

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alvin, tx
norgeskog said:
What is your favorite or most helpful kitchen hint or problem that needs solving????

Mine is an ongoing problem in the kitchen is keeping the wooden cuttingboard bacteria/germ free. My wooden cuttingboard is only used to vegetables, bread, etc. I clean it regularly with white vinegar and a paper towel. I have a plastic flexible cutting board that I use over the wooden one when I prepare meat. That one I scrub with hot water, dish soap and white vinegar. What do you use for these. I also wipe my kitchen counters weekly with straight white vinegar (suggeston from my vinegar helpful household remedy book) but then my kitchen smells like a salad for a day.


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:roll:

two words for you...bleach

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Psiguyy

Sous Chef
Joined
Aug 24, 2004
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843
Wooden cutting boards must be treated regularly with food grade mineral oil. The oil fills the pores of the wood and keeps food and bacteria out.

If you have never treated it with oil, you'll need to sand it down to bare clean wood before you treat it. In the future, retreating the board regularly will be a simple matter of just wiping oil on the board and letting it sit overnight.
 

Juliev

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hey psiguyy.. what did you fix with your cod.. we never heard.. sorry my recipe wasn't what you wanted.. I'll post it over in the fish section.
 

buckytom

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to keep sponges clean and from smelling like mold, i rinse out all of the soap, wrap in a paper towel and nuke for 2 to 3 minutes until they dry out. (you don't lose any nutritional value in the sponge either, lol) i do this every few days, or if the sponges start to get smelly.
 

norgeskog

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Thanks for all the postings, some really helpful hints here. Regarding the bleach, thank you, but I do not like to use chemicals that are toxic which is why I have the vinegar book which is where I got the suggestion for cleaning cutting boards and counter tops. My everyday dishes are clear glass, and I add vinegar to the dishwater to keep away spots.


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Psiguyy

Sous Chef
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Juliev said:
hey psiguyy.. what did you fix with your cod.. we never heard.. sorry my recipe wasn't what you wanted.. I'll post it over in the fish section.

I have your recipe for the next time. I battered and deep fried it. Ate it with my own tartar sauce (mayo, capers, diced sweet pickle, and Splenda).

norgeskog said:
Thanks for all the postings, some really helpful hints here. Regarding the bleach, thank you, but I do not like to use chemicals that are toxic which is why I have the vinegar book which is where I got the suggestion for cleaning cutting boards and counter tops. My everyday dishes are clear glass, and I add vinegar to the dishwater to keep away spots.


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Surprisingly, bleach is not poisonous.

Did you know that according to the Taylor company that before you put the ice cream mix into their barrel freezer (soft serve yogurt, ice cream, etc. machines) you are to run a chlorine based (bleach) sanitizer through the machine, let it drain, and put the mix right in. They say water is not as clean as the sanitizer, so if you rinse the bleach out with fresh water, you are contaminating the machine.
 
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luvs

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da 'burgh
not sure if someone already posted this or not, but lining baking sheets with foil is such an excellent way to keep baking sheets that you put into the oven and broiler clean. especially when you are cooking meats. just remove the foil and wash the pan if you choose to do so. (i do, but that's me)
lining the broiler with foil (non-deflective side up) or just crumbling the edges up around a food is another thing. :D
 

Bangbang

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Before company comes over.....our a little vanilla in a lightly heated pan. Smells great but you better back up that smell with some cookies. :LOL:
 

norgeskog

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Psiguyy said:
norgeskog said:
Thanks for all the postings, some really helpful hints here. Regarding the bleach, thank you, but I do not like to use chemicals that are toxic which is why I have the vinegar book which is where I got the suggestion for cleaning cutting boards and counter tops. My everyday dishes are clear glass, and I add vinegar to the dishwater to keep away spots.


green.gif
:roll: GO DUCKS

Surprisingly, bleach is not poisonous.

Did you know that according to the Taylor company that before you put
the ice cream mix into their barrel freezer (soft serve yogurt, ice cream, etc. machines) you are to run a chlorine based (bleach) sanitizer through the machine, let it drain, and put the mix right in. They say water is not as clean as the sanitizer, so if you rinse the bleach out with fresh water, you are contaminating the machine.

Are you certain they have the same chemical base? I have not bought bleach for 8+ years and I remember the label saying poison, use only in ventilated area, do not take orally, etc and this was the clothing wash type. They use chlorine to purify swimming pools. Confusing. I will look at the label again the next time I shop.
 

norgeskog

Washing Up
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Aug 28, 2004
Messages
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Location
Eugene, Oregon
Psiguyy said:
Wooden cutting boards must be treated regularly with food grade mineral oil. The oil fills the pores of the wood and keeps food and bacteria out.

If you have never treated it with oil, you'll need to sand it down to bare clean wood before you treat it. In the future, retreating the board regularly will be a simple matter of just wiping oil on the board and letting it sit overnight.

Thanks, I have heard that before, but forgotten it. I believe I will try this as my wooden cutting board needs to be sanded down, it does not look as pretty as it used to.

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norgeskog

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luvs_food said:
not sure if someone already posted this or not, but lining baking sheets with foil is such an excellent way to keep baking sheets that you put into the oven and broiler clean. especially when you are cooking meats. just remove the foil and wash the pan if you choose to do so. (i do, but that's me)
lining the broiler with foil (non-deflective side up) or just crumbling the edges up around a food is another thing. :D

At the risk of sounding nuts or stupid (I am blond so that is my excuse) the non-deflective side the shiny rather than matte finish???? What happens if the other side is up. I heard somewhere that one side should not touch the food you are eating because of the alzeimers (sp) threat with aluminum. What do you know about this? Rumor or truth?

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Hungry

Senior Cook
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Nov 1, 2004
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USA, Nevada and California
I started to buy a package of those disposable plastic sheets for temporary cutting boards. Right on the next shelf were the paper products, bowls plates cups, etc.
I bought a package of those super thin paper plates, much cheaper than the palstic ones.
I use them for a quick chop when I don't want to dirty up my cutting board.
Just toss then on the trash when finished
Also good for popping in to the microwave with a snack.

I'll use then for laying out my ingredents prior to mixing a recipe. A little stronger than a paper towel.
They don't hold liquids very long.


Charlie
 
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