First time making Apple Crisp.

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Cooking4Fun

Senior Cook
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I tried this recipe. It didn't turn out bad, but wasn't quite 4 stars. It called for a ceramic baking dish but I only had glass. It said 2qt but I couldn't find one labeled by volume except for the 3qt 13by9 dish. The squared dish appeared 2/3 full when filled with 1qt of water so I just used 3qt dish to be safe.

It came out ok on apple layer. Perhaps needed more seasoning. But the oats layer got dry and hard. Recipe said bake 55 to 70 minutes. I probably approached 65 as I can't really judge stuff by color. Not sure if I overcooked. I was concerned 1.5 sticks of butter was excessive. I like to avoid butter when possible, and saturated fats in general.


Any suggestions? What are the biggest factors to getting the texture right?
 
Two things come to mind:

1. By using a larger pan, the crisp layer was thinner so more likely to overcook
2. You probably cooked it for too long. You sort of have to judge it by color. That and when the molten juices start leaking out.

I assume you used the full amount of butter. If you didn’t, that was the real problem.

if you don’t like butter, a crisp probably isn’t the right choice, since the topping is all about the butter.
 
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If you would prefer not to use butter or saturated fat try a vegan recipe.

Some vegan recipes use maple syrup or applesauce as a binder for the crumb topping.

Removing the fat will give you a different texture but only you can decide if it’s worth it.

Here is one example:

 
It could also have to do with oven temperature. I always lower the heat by 25°F, when I bake in glass pans instead of metal ones. I'm not sure how that compares with using glass instead of ceramic. I don't know if there is a usual temperature adjustment when using ceramic instead of metal.
 
I know, right lol.

Margarines and the like were probably one of the first manmade food ventures looking to make money from the latest technologies of the day without understanding what consequences might ensue given people eat as opposed to use the product, big difference. People still don't understand agricultural fully and that's 14,000 years old so it stands to reason that partially hydrogenated seed oils of the early 1900's previously used for lubrication of mostly machinery would be totally misunderstood. Nature on the other hand built the hosts we occupy and with 3 or 4 million years in the making I'm placing my bets with mother nature and butter. :)
 
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I know, right lol.

Margarines and the like were probably one of the first manmade food ventures looking to make money from the latest technologies of the day without understanding what consequences might ensue given people eat as opposed to use the product, big difference. People still don't understand agricultural fully and that's 14,000 years old so it stands to reason that partially hydrogenated seed oils of the early 1900's previously used for lubrication of mostly machinery would be totally misunderstood. Nature on the other hand built the hosts we occupy and with 3 or 4 million years in the making I'm placing my bets with mother nature and butter. :)
I often say that I like food made of food. My body knows what to do with it. It tastes good.

Back in the day, almost everyone believed that margarine was better for you. :ermm:
 
Are there standard dimensions for a 2qt glass pan?

Maybe I could soak oats in apple juice and a little honey? Would that have similar effect? I don't know what binding is required. I find apple crisp made by pros just falls apart anyway. It's not like a pie.

Also did seasoning seem too light?
 
Are there standard dimensions for a 2qt glass pan?

Maybe I could soak oats in apple juice and a little honey? Would that have similar effect? I don't know what binding is required. I find apple crisp made by pros just falls apart anyway. It's not like a pie.

Also did seasoning seem too light?
2 qt is an 8x8 square dish

are you asking if you can soak the oats in juice and honey instead of using butter? That’s a hard no. You’ll end up with a hard cracker on top of the apples.

Crisp topping needs butter. It’s supposed to be deliciously crumbly

Seasoning is up to you. If you thought it was light add more of whatever suits you.

I’d suggest making it again following the recipe exactly using an 8 by 8 pan and more spices. Be careful not to overcook.

Also, maybe a different thing might work better for you
 
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2 qt is an 8x8 square dish

are you asking if you can soak the oats in juice and honey instead of using butter? That’s a hard no. You’ll end up with a hard cracker on top of the apples.

Crisp topping needs butter. It’s supposed to be deliciously crumbly

Seasoning is up to you. If you thought it was light add more of whatever suits you.

I’d suggest making it again following the recipe exactly using an 8 by 8 pan and more spices. Be careful not to overcook.

Also, maybe a different thing might work better for you
Thanks. I know health wise it might not change much, but would coconut oil work instead? Also high in saturated fat, but would be a unique flavor for experiments sake?
 
Cooking - Once one has done the original then one experiments.
Otherwise how does one know what they're aiming for?
One may well like the original better - health wise or not.

Most desserts were sort of meant to be sweet. It helps to curb the appetite and tells your body you're finished.
 
This old recipe from the 60s is easy and disappears quickly.

I usually cut the sugar by half and add broken walnuts.

Grab handfuls of the topping mixture and squeeze it to create some larger nuggets.

CRUNCH

1 cup AP flour
1 cup oatmeal
1 cup brown sugar
1 stick of butter or margarine
1 can of pie filling

Mix flour, oatmeal, brown sugar. Melt butter and add to the dry ingredients.
Use half of the mixture on the bottom of a pie pan or small casserole. Add can of pie filling. Top with remaining crumbs. Bake at 350 for 30 to 45 minutes. Serve warm with vanilla ice cream. 🐷🐷🐷
 
I agree with Dragn that you should follow the recipe, as written, at least once.

Butter is about 80% fat. Coconut oil is about 96.5% fat. That can make a difference when baking.
 
Cooking - Once one has done the original then one experiments.
Otherwise how does one know what they're aiming for?
One may well like the original better - health wise or not.

Most desserts were sort of meant to be sweet. It helps to curb the appetite and tells your body you're finished.
Sweet is fine in desserts, but too much butter makes me gag.
 
I agree with Dragn that you should follow the recipe, as written, at least once.

Butter is about 80% fat. Coconut oil is about 96.5% fat. That can make a difference when baking.
Perhaps than 1 stick of butter and closer to 1/6th cup coconut oil?
 
I'm not understanding. Butter makes you gag, that I can understand. But when it is used to make a crumble on the top of something - You don't actually taste butter, maybe the salt - more importantly - nor would you notice the texture of the butter as it is a binder with the oats and brown sugar. Not like if it was a spread on a piece of bread.
Do you think you might be able to explain please?
 

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