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I got a bit over-excited and went for an online deal - so now I have a pear tree to plant!

It's a bare root, and about 1.5m high. I am going to plant it out in the front garden this weekend and see what happens. (It only cost £5 so not the end of the world, but I am not sure I will ever see any pears.)
 
My first pepper seed sprouted today, after just 4 days! It is one of the Thai Dragon seeds. I moved the tray upstairs, to under the light, and I'll have to adjust that heat mat to keep them around 85°, like when they were over the pilot lights.

This evening I got the seeds for my tomatoes and one tomatillo variety soaking, and those will all get planted tomorrow.
21 tomato varieties, and one tomatillo, set to soak overnight. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

I have to salute you, because that is way too much work for me to do for some peppers. Granted, I can buy a large variety of peppers in stores where I live. But, if growing peppers makes you happy, go for it! (y)

CD
 
As I was cleaning up along the wall, I found some overlooked potatoes that I had planted last year. They feel pretty solid and actually look pretty good. Is it possible to use them for seed potatoes even if they have not yet developed "eyes?"
 
I just saw another pepper peeping through this morning - turns out it was one of those Hanoi markets, which usually aren't some of the faster ones. Those Thai Dragon ones are all the way up, with their fake leaves spread out, so I turned another light on - still one more left on the eggplant side, where I haven't seen any sprouts yet.

Two more peppers up, when I went up to get something later, and had to look again - a Thai vesuvius, and a Big Mic. 4 of the 12 varieties in just 6 days.
 
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As I was cleaning up along the wall, I found some overlooked potatoes that I had planted last year. They feel pretty solid and actually look pretty good. Is it possible to use them for seed potatoes even if they have not yet developed "eyes?"

Store bought potatoes these days are treated with something to prevent eyes from developing -- probably something from Monsanto. Since you grew yours, they should develop eyes.

Like dragnlaw said, all you can do is try. Nothing to lose.

CD
 
Store bought potatoes these days are treated with something to prevent eyes from developing -- probably something from Monsanto. Since you grew yours, they should develop eyes.

Like dragnlaw said, all you can do is try. Nothing to lose.

CD
This isn't a recent thing and it isn't connected to Monsanto, which doesn't even exist anymore. It's also a treatment that only works on potatoes in storage at the wholesalers because it's a vapor, so it's a temporary condition. Potatoes can sprout after they've been stored at home for a period of time. From the Idaho Potato Commission
To knock down the growth of the sprouts they mixed a chemical diluted with water into the atmosphere as a vapor form where the potatoes are stored. It is not something that potatoes are immersed in or dipped in. This mist is sufficient to curb the growth of the sprouts for a while. If you ever buy potatoes and leave them out at room temp for a week or two you’ll find that they may start to have “peepers” which left alone will grow into sprouts. One ad I saw in a growers based magazine said Sprout Nip is applied as a fog or emusifiable spray, and one gallon treats 66,000 pounds of potatoes. That’s pretty diluted! Sprout Nip has been used on potatoes since 1952 and is considered one of the safest applications know for vegetables.
 
Today, besides straightening up, and getting ready out there, for when those things just starting up inside will be going out (these few weeks fly by quickly! :ohmy:), I also direct seeded some herbs (dill, cilantro, and parsley, again), and greens (a couple brassicas, and the lettuce). I also planted a clump of marjoram - something I had in a Jr EB on my back porch, along with a cutting of the Syrian oregano, both of those I had, along with that rooted rosemary, just in case it got excessively cold, and killed the outside plants. The marjoram outside didn't even die back, winter was so mild, and this cutting spread to about a 6" cluster, and when I removed it from the EB, to clean out the soil, and top it off, I just dropped this in a pot, under the table I was working on out there last weekend, and it grew even more, with all that rain! I hate to throw anything like that away (and nobody I know would use that), so I just planted it in an area I will let it spread as a weed, like that area I have all those garlic chives in! :LOL: I'll see how long it takes to spread.

That garlic is going crazy, with all that rain! I'm glad I chose to plant it in the raised bed again this rear - not sure if it would have done as well without the drainage, and all this rain.

No hint of scapes yet, but will be soon.
Garlic, doing great, after that excessive rain I've seen having. 4-7 by pepperhead212, on Flickr
 
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Check out all that garlic! And here I'm buying it for $5 a tube.

Well, now one of my azalea plants is showing signs of green leaves and the blue mist plants are all planted. Notice I didn't say I planted the irises.

Speaking of which, the deer, which left the irises alone last year, are now eating all the irises I planted last year and which were coming up. I don't know what to do with them at this point.

At any rate, planting is on the schedule but not in the near future. My trailer tank is being pumped tomorrow and my car finally goes in Wednesday when I can finally get half my laundry to the laundromat, which is a block from the mechanic.

Meantime I was up all Friday night and in the ER all Saturday with - gallstones. And on top of everything else, the zipper broke off my purse. Man, I'm telling you, when it rains, it pours.
 
Today, besides straightening up, and getting ready out there, for when those things just starting up inside will be going out (these few weeks fly by quickly! :ohmy:), I also direct seeded some herbs (dill, cilantro, and parsley, again), and greens (a couple brassicas, and the lettuce). I also planted a clump of marjoram - something I had in a Jr EB on my back porch, along with a cutting of the Syrian oregano, both of those I had, along with that rooted rosemary, just in case it got excessively cold, and killed the outside plants. The marjoram outside didn't even die back, winter was so mild, and this cutting spread to about a 6" cluster, and when I removed it from the EB, to clean out the soil, and top it off, I just dropped this in a pot, under the table I was working on out there last weekend, and it grew even more, with all that rain! I hate to throw anything like that away (and nobody I know would use that), so I just planted it in an area I will let it spread as a weed, like that area I have all those garlic chives in! :LOL: I'll see how long it takes to spread.

That garlic is going crazy, with all that rain! I'm glad I chose to plant it in the raised bed again this rear - not sure if it would have done as well without the drainage, and all this rain.

No hint of scapes yet, but will be soon.
Garlic, doing great, after that excessive rain I've seen having. 4-7 by pepperhead212, on Flickr
How early do you get scapes ?
I got all my garlic in raised beds too. Ran into some drainage issues a few years back. Did the best I could to make the soil more drainable, and it did improve, but I think the raised bed is the better, hopefully more predictable choice.
 
@larry_stewart actually, it won't be real soon - sometime in the middle of May. I think the size of these now had me distracted - usually they don't get this large this quickly. Many years ago, they weren't even getting started much, until about a week into March, and I would set up my drip lines after they would be about maybe 6", at the most, 2 or 3 weeks into March! But there's no global warming. :LOL:

I remember early on, when I was first growing garlic, I read that cutting the scapes from the garlic, as soon as they would appear, would give larger heads, then I read that letting the scapes turn hard and woody, and reaching straight up, before cutting off (and these are obviously not edible, but this was before scapes were very popular), the garlic would store much longer. I did some experiments, and didn't notice much difference either way, so I let them get to edible size, then cut them.
 
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@larry_stewart actually, it won't be real soon - sometime in the middle of May. I think the size of these now had me distracted - usually they don't get this large this quickly. Many years ago, they weren't even getting started much, until about a week into March, and I would set up my drip lines after they would be about maybe 6", at the most, 2 or 3 weeks into March! But there's no global warming. :LOL:

I remember early on, when I was first growing garlic, I read that cutting the scapes from the garlic, as soon as they would appear, would give larger heads, then I read that letting the scapes turn hard and woody, and reaching straight up, before cutting off (and these are obviously not edible, but this was before scapes were very popular), the garlic would store much longer. I did some experiments, and didn't notice much difference either way, so I let them get to edible size, then cut them.
Inn the past, its was almost tradition for us to harvest our garlic on July 4th ( then watch the hot dog eating contest). A few years back I was forced to pick them a few weeks earlier due to drainage issues causing some to start rotting earlier. Now , comes mid June, I keep a very close eye on them. Sometimes even selectively harvesting a few (That may look like something is starting to go on) as a ' test harvest' . If they look good, I just go for it. Its possible they may get bigger with the few extra weeks, but after that one year of almost loosing 1/3 of what planted, or at the very least, the quality was poor, id rather get a lot of slightly smaller bulbs that store well, than risk getting ones that are stating to goo bad and have to be used immediately.

Years ago, garlic was a 'no brainer' crop. Toss them in the ground in October. didn't;t mulch, didn't fertilize, don't worry ... Then pick them on the 4th of July. They were healthy, huge and extremely predictable. Now, although I get a good harvest, I am paranoid about them getting water logged after those few bad experiences.
* I didn't notice any differences with the varieties , just the location planted.

***Im apologizing in advance for the details below***

Scapes/ Bulb Harvest Dates:
2018 Scapes picked June 11, Garlic harvested July 3rd
2019 June 12, July 7th
2020 June 6th, July 4th ***But on June 24th, noticed the leaves getting dying off significantly earlier than the past. This was the year they were drainage issues and 1/3 the top was sub par.
2021 June 1 noticed the leaves dying off significantly early agin 9 but those in the raised bed seemed ok) June 7th harvested the poor drainage bed, June 8th the scapes, June 13th harvested the rest ( because I was paranoid and figured better something than nothing. Amended soil for following year.
2022 June 1, again noticed a few getting that unusuall leaf browning. Picked those to find the internal part of the garlic, where the stalk was, rotting. June 5th scapes, June 22 Harvested the garlic. better than previous few years, but made a big note to relocate the garlic to raised beds, as those did much better.
2023 June 12 Picked all the scapes, June 27 Garlic picked. Minimal issues

Noticed scapes forming:
2018 Didnt keep record , but they started curling June 6th
2022 June 2
2021 May 25
2020 May 23
2019 May 21
2023 May 21

Planted for the following year:
2018 - October 17th ( Music, Montana)
2019 - October 23rd (German, Music, Montana)
2020 - October 17th (German, Metechi, Music, Montana)
2021 - October 16th ( Music, Montana, German)
2022 - October 16th (German (large and jumbo sized cloves)
2023 - October 18th (German, large cloves )

***Sorry for the details, it's in my blood ***
 
Had a major set back today. I planted all my tomato seeds in those little peat pods a few days ago. Problem is, the tray that they are in is a little flies (especially when those pods are hydrated0, so I went to check on them. the tray warped, and about 1/3 of the pods fell out. Wouldn't be a problem if I planted all the same variety of tomatoes, but I have about a dozen different varieties . no way to tell which is which, so I started over again in marked cells (the way I have always done it) and made sure the tray supporting them was stable. ill probably give the unmarked ones away as ' mystery tomatoes'.
- Im very specific about which variety I plant where
- Also, I always plant more than I need just incase seeds dont germinate, so I dont want to wind up unknowingly planting more of one variety, and none of another.

Luckily I have plenty of time, just annoying. In the same tray I had planted tomatillos and some chard. those will be easy to identify.
 
Figs sprouted on one of my fig trees.
 

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Figs sprouted on one of my fig trees.
I have just recently been getting into growing figs. I have about 10 varieties . Most in pots, cause it's a little too cold and unpredictable around here to keep them in the ground and expect them to produce. Although, I do have a few in the ground. Im envious and jealous of the amount of figs you have on your tree. Any clue what variety it is ?
 
I got 2 more sprouts peeping through (actually, 2 in each pellet) - the first of the Asian Delight Hybrid, and more of the Matrosik. The Ichiban is the only one I haven't gotten any of yet.

More of some of the first peppers that came up also sprouted, plus the first Mucho Nacho jalapeño, and Datil seeds have sprouted. Maybe more - that was earlier in the morning. And maybe some tomatoes now - still none this morning.
 
I have just recently been getting into growing figs. I have about 10 varieties . Most in pots, cause it's a little too cold and unpredictable around here to keep them in the ground and expect them to produce. Although, I do have a few in the ground. Im envious and jealous of the amount of figs you have on your tree. Any clue what variety it is ?

Our fig trees grow well in the ground here, in the Mediterranean, as the climate guarantees long, hot, dry Summers. They don't even need much caring for.
I'm not well-informed on the varieties, but I think this one is a "Fico bianco del Cilento", the fruits have a green skin but are ripe and ready to harvest when they turn yellow (end of August/Sept). We have two other enormous trees like that one, which are over 30 years old.
We also have other varieties, one is the "Brogiotto Nero" which has fruits with a dark purple skin, they are a lot sweeter.

I found this foto on a website of a Cilento fig, but I think it must have been harvested when it wasn't quite ripe yet! 🤔
 

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Our fig trees grow well in the ground here, in the Mediterranean, as the climate guarantees long, hot, dry Summers. They don't even need much caring for.
I'm not well-informed on the varieties, but I think this one is a "Fico bianco del Cilento", the fruits have a green skin but are ripe and ready to harvest when they turn yellow (end of August/Sept). We have two other enormous trees like that one, which are over 30 years old.
We also have other varieties, one is the "Brogiotto Nero" which has fruits with a dark purple skin, they are a lot sweeter.

I found this foto on a website of a Cilento fig, but I think it must have been harvested when it wasn't quite ripe yet! 🤔

I think I may have already posted this somewhere on the forum, but I had a big fig tree growing at the lake house that I did nothing to maintain, but it always produced a lot of figs, that my ex-wife baked into all kinds of tasty desserts. The tree was there when we bought the house, so I don't know how old it was.

CD
 

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