Greasing the pan question

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larry_stewart

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Im making Strawberry/ Rhubarb crum bars.
The directions say to grease a 9 X 13 pan, and line with Parchment paper.

The picture they show has the parchment paper lining the complete pan ( bottom and running up the sides.

Im not much of a baker, so my question is, why grease the pan if its going to be completely lined with parchment paper?

I have a few theories in my mind, but curious to hear what someone ( who knows what they are doing) says.

Thanks.
 
Im making Strawberry/ Rhubarb crum bars.
The directions say to grease a 9 X 13 pan, and line with Parchment paper.

The picture they show has the parchment paper lining the complete pan ( bottom and running up the sides.

Im not much of a baker, so my question is, why grease the pan if its going to be completely lined with parchment paper?

I have a few theories in my mind, but curious to hear what someone ( who knows what they are doing) says.

Thanks.
Hmm, I never thought of it like that - I just do it. I think it may stop the contents of the pan burning or over-browning. If it says do it - do it. There may be a good reason.
 
I saw Ina Garten make something like that recently. After baking and cooling, she used the parchment as a sling to remove the entire thing from the pan and put it on a cutting board. Then she removed the parchment, cut the bars into serving-size pieces and served them from the board.
 
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For certain cakes, I grease the pan, apply parchment to the bottom and grease the parchment.

When the cake is done and cooled, I run a knife around the inside walls of the pan and the cake falls right out. If you skip the parchment, the cake sticks to the pan.
 
I saw Ina Garten make something like that recently. After baking and cooling, she used the parchment as a sling to remove the entire thing from the pan and put it on a cutting board. Then she removed the parchment, cut the bars into serving-size pieces and served them from the board.

++1 to use as handles to remove the cake without tipping it out.
 
I saw Ina Garten make something like that recently. After baking and cooling, she used the parchment as a sling to remove the entire thing from the pan and put it on a cutting board. Then she removed the parchment, cut the bars into serving-size pieces and served them from the board.

^^^^^
This.

Food doesn't stick to the parchment. The parchment doesn't stick to the pan.
 
Some folks grease the pan first and then line with the parchment paper. I always figured this was to stick the paper to the pan so it remains totally flat. Sometimes it's hard to get whatever you are cooking into the pan if the parchment paper is trying to curl up.
 
Some folks grease the pan first and then line with the parchment paper. I always figured this was to stick the paper to the pan so it remains totally flat. Sometimes it's hard to get whatever you are cooking into the pan if the parchment paper is trying to curl up.

That was my thoughts, cause the paper kinda lifts up and moves around a bit. After greasing, it stays put.

As a follow up, everything worked out. Nothing stuck to the pan. I was able to remove the cookie bars with ease. I would have just knocked off about 5 - 10 minutes from the cook time ( bottoms slightly overdone which, of course, my wife had to point out).
 
Just tell DW she can do the baking from now on. ;)

She usually does ;)
I don't know what got into me.

Truth is , I have the mother load of rhubarb in the garden. She thought she didn't like it, so wanted nothing to do with it. Thats where I came in. We had just gone strawberry picking the day before, so I took it upon myself to make use of the rhubarb. After tasting it, she realized she liked it.
 
That was my thoughts, cause the paper kinda lifts up and moves around a bit. After greasing, it stays put.

As a follow up, everything worked out. Nothing stuck to the pan. I was able to remove the cookie bars with ease. I would have just knocked off about 5 - 10 minutes from the cook time ( bottoms slightly overdone which, of course, my wife had to point out).
Over here we can buy packs of ready cut circles and squares for bases of baking tins/pans, rolls of paper just the width of the depth of the average baking tins/pans (I hope this makes sense) and complete liners for loaf tins and round tins.

Only fractionally dearer than sheets of paper but if you are batch baking they save a lot of time. I expect you can get them where you are. I get them in a specialist cookware shop because it's an excuse to go and browse but they're available in supermarkets, hardware stores, etc., too
 
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