Has anyone tried salt dried egg yolks?

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taxlady

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Today I came across a recipe for salt dried egg yolks. They are supposed to add a lot of umami to dishes. I did do an internet search and found out that there are several ways to cure and dry them. Does anyone here know anything about them? Has anyone made some? Eaten them?
 
I've used dried egg yolks for baking dishes, just putting them in with the dried goods. Never tried the salt dried ones - related to black eggs, maybe?
 
I've used dried egg yolks for baking dishes, just putting them in with the dried goods. Never tried the salt dried ones - related to black eggs, maybe?
I don't know what a black egg is.

According to what I read, to make them, you put salt, possibly mixed with some sugar, into a container. You make little divots in the salt and put each egg yolk into its own divot. Then you cover the egg yolks completely with the salt or salt and sugar mixture. Close the lid on the container and leave it in a cool place, like the fridge, for 4 days to a week. After that, the salt is wiped off and the yolks are either dried in the oven for a few hours or air dried for a week to 10 days. After that, they can be grated onto food. Some people use it as a dairy free alternative to Parm.
 
My dad made salted eggs, but just the whole egg. You boiled afterwards and they were a pain to peel.
It must have been an Indonesian recipe. I'm going to google for a reliable link
 
I've had whole salted eggs - the salted duck eggs are the ones the Asian markets usually have. But I've never seen just salted egg yolks.
 
I tried to find out more about the salted egg yolks. All I could find were various forms of whole salted eggs. But, I could find recipes to make salt dried egg yolks. In the link for one recipe, the blogger wrote that it was a lot like making charcuterie at home. She called it a gateway charcuterie. ;)

I'm going to try making this once I have some spare space in my fridge or the weather is consistently below 10°C (50°F). I am of two minds about the drying part. Should I air dry and keep the probiotics or oven dry and have them ready more quickly, without taking a lot of fridge space?

Does anyone know anything about the safety of air drying those cured egg yolks? The oven method would kill any microorganisms, but we eat charcuterie that hasn't had it's microorganisms killed by heat. I assume the curing process kills off the undesirable microorganisms.

Here are some recipes I found for making salt dried egg yolks:

Salt Cured Egg Yolks
Salt Cured Egg Yolks | Get Cracking
 
Sorry, my link was for whole salted eggs.
All I can think of is making those, then boil, peel and keep the yolk.
Salt content is so high, it gotta be safe to dry whichever way...
 
Sorry, my link was for whole salted eggs.
All I can think of is making those, then boil, peel and keep the yolk.
Salt content is so high, it gotta be safe to dry whichever way...
While those eggs sound interesting, it's really not what I'm looking for. The salt dried yolks are used more like grating parm onto food.
 
Hard yolks are often grated as a finishing touch on different dishes.
So what is the purpose of salting them? To me salting any kinds of food is strictly a preservation issue.
 
The flavor is hard to describe. It's not one I prefer, but I don't object to it either.
 
Hard yolks are often grated as a finishing touch on different dishes.
So what is the purpose of salting them? To me salting any kinds of food is strictly a preservation issue.
Salting them for a week cures the yolks. It supposedly changes the flavour quite a lot. Sauerkraut is just salted, shredded cabbage that has been left to cure.
 
If I remember correctly, sauerkraut was made to be used as a winter vegetable when there was no refrigeration. Salt cod, sauerkraut, preserved foods. Pickled eggs to me would be easier - and I should imagine, tastier! :ROFLMAO:
 
Salting them for a week cures the yolks. It supposedly changes the flavour quite a lot. Sauerkraut is just salted, shredded cabbage that has been left to cure.
Not quite. Salting the cabbage kills undesirable microorganisms while allowing others to grow. It also draws water from the cabbage and the desired microorganisms need that water in order to grow. A byproduct of the reproductive process is acids that add flavor to the sauerkraut. So it's not just cured - it's fermented.
 
Not quite. Salting the cabbage kills undesirable microorganisms while allowing others to grow. It also draws water from the cabbage and the desired microorganisms need that water in order to grow. A byproduct of the reproductive process is acids that add flavor to the sauerkraut. So it's not just cured - it's fermented.
You are right, but I think the curing part starts changing the flavour. A better example would have been corned beef or graved laks.
 
I've made them before and posted about the process. Don't remember if it was on here or not. Will have to look around. I did the refrigerator method.

I'll start a thread.
 
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I've done salted dried egg yolks. They were okay....they grated like hard cheese and were kind of....irony tasting? I did recently gathered egg yolks in a kosher salt and sugar mix as is stated and left them in the fridge several days until they got hard. Dug them out and put them on a caco e pepo. They were kind of hard to grate though, even with a microplane. They were at the same time kind of hard but also crumbled as you grated them. I probably wouldn't make them again, but they were fun to attempt nonetheless. They won't spread as they're way too hard than that. They kind of crumple like a hard feta.
 
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