How about foods you've tried once or twice that you'll never eat again.

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Quinoa, I don't intensely dislike it but I don't cook it nor buy it. I did before it became the rage. It was dirt cheap, came in many 'colours', was 'healthy' and different. But the cooking was tedious and not done right was bitter.

So it fell by the way side but even so, when I decided this new recipe deserved it, I was going to buy. When I saw the prices - the recipe flew out the window.
I believe the price was a direct result of the "fad".

I believe the prices have come back down quite a bit since of course, but still I don't figure it worth the price, taste nor effort.
I thought quinoa was pretty good after I was told to rinse it, even if it was pre-rinsed, to get rid of the bitterness. Craig, on the other hand, refused to eat anymore after the second try. Said he felt like he was eating bugs. A friend's hub said the same thing so we both gave up.
 
I understand when someone says they don't like something but I sometimes wonder if it's maybe an ingredient, like for curry, maybe it's the cumin that you find off putting. Or is it just Indian cuisine you find a dislike for? just curious.
I used to not like most Indian foods I tried, but that was back when most in this area were northern or Pakistan type, and had raw cinnamon in them - something I simply can't stand in most of those savory dishes I'd find them in. And it seems every garam masala - the only spice mix I used to find, besides curry powder - had more cinnamon in it than anything else. It wasn't until I started making it myself, and pan roasted all of the spices, before grinding them, and the flavor was incredible. Not too long after, I started finding a lot of spice mixes from the southern and middle regions of India, and found different methods for preparing them - one is adding a tsp or two of oil to the spices, before roasting them in the skillet, before grinding them. Gives them a different, and totally delicious flavor.

Then there is Thai curry - something I have never made a batch of that I didn't like, though it wasn't until I started making the curry paste, that I fell in love with it! The things that made me grow those lime trees, because they outlawed the import of them for several years, due to citrus diseases coming in on them (similar to Szechwan peppercorns, about the same time period, though I never grew them!). I always make a little less than a pint of curry paste at a time, use some for one batch, then freeze the rest.
 
Do you folks who dislike wholewheat pasta dislike everything wholewheat? If not, have you tried wholewheat pasta imported from Italy. Until I tried Italian wholewheat pasta, I was always surprised by the unpleasant flavour of wholewheat pasta, since I usually prefer whole grain anything. I really enjoy the flavour of Italian whole grain pastas. It's not boring, nearly flavourless like white pasta.
 
Do you folks who dislike wholewheat pasta dislike everything wholewheat? If not, have you tried wholewheat pasta imported from Italy. Until I tried Italian wholewheat pasta, I was always surprised by the unpleasant flavour of wholewheat pasta, since I usually prefer whole grain anything. I really enjoy the flavour of Italian whole grain pastas. It's not boring, nearly flavourless like white pasta.

If it's top quality wholewheat pasta, then it's ok, but the cheaper ones are not good🙄.
 
I understand when someone says they don't like something but I sometimes wonder if it's maybe an ingredient, like for curry, maybe it's the cumin that you find off putting. Or is it just Indian cuisine you find a dislike for? just curious.

The curry I tried once was made with curry powder.
 
As much as I like bread, I dislike most grain breads. I can eat a slice or two, It's different and sometimes nice - but I would never buy a loaf of any kind of grained bread. I like oatmeal bread, rye, sourdough. But you can keep your all grains, 7 grains, 12 grains!
I also like pumpernickel, schwarzbrot - breads like that.

As to the pasta, I believe the whole wheat pasta I tried was Italian, but it was a long time ago. Not sure but it was before the rage of running to supposedly "healthier" types of junk.
 
Curry powder, that's one that is reverse for me. I used to get nauseous, even smelling curry powder. Then, we figured out, through a lot of trial and error and freshly ground spices, that it was fenugreek that was making the smell I can't tolerate. It's not just fenugreek; it's specifically stale fenugreek. Well, I think that curry powder bottles at the supermarkets aren't as old and stale as they used to be, because I seldom come across that smell anymore. I still prefer to use a curry paste or make a massala.
 
I thought quinoa was pretty good after I was told to rinse it, even if it was pre-rinsed, to get rid of the bitterness. Craig, on the other hand, refused to eat anymore after the second try. Said he felt like he was eating bugs. A friend's hub said the same thing so we both gave up.
Love quinoa. I found a great recipe years ago for quinoa 'burgers' (although I never eat them as a burger, I just eat them by themselves) that's so delicious. I need to make them again soon. For just myself, I cut the recipe in half.

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2 rounded cups cooked quinoa (see note below for cooking instructions)

3/4 cup shredded cheddar cheese (or other variety, if you prefer)

1/2 cup low-fat cottage cheese

1 medium carrot, finely grated (OR 1 cup shredded zucchini, squeezed dry)

3 eggs

3 tablespoons all purpose flour

2 green onions, including white parts

1 /2 teaspoon sugar

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon garlic powder

Olive oil for frying


To cook quinoa for the above recipe:

1 cup uncooked quinoa

2 cups water

1/2 teaspoon salt

In a medium saucepan bring the 2 cups water and 1/2 teaspoon salt to a boil over high heat. Add quinoa and reduce heat to low. Cover and cook for 18-20 minutes, or until all water is absorbed and the seeds are tender. Allow to cool for a few minutes.


In a large bowl combine the 2 rounded cups of cooked quinoa, cheddar cheese, cottage cheese, carrot, eggs, flour, green onions, sugar, pepper, cumin, salt, and garlic powder.


(To help them stay in patty form and not fall apart, I cook them on med-low slowly so they have longer to set-up without burning. Makes them easier to flip, too.) Heat a frying pan and a couple teaspoons olive oil over medium-low heat. Mixture will be slightly sticky, so using a 1/4 cup measuring cup, drop mixture into pan and lightly flatten to 1/2 inch thick. Fry until golden-brown, about 4 minutes on each side. Makes approx. 10 burgers.
 
As much as I like bread, I dislike most grain breads. I can eat a slice or two, It's different and sometimes nice - but I would never buy a loaf of any kind of grained bread. I like oatmeal bread, rye, sourdough. But you can keep your all grains, 7 grains, 12 grains!
I also like pumpernickel, schwarzbrot - breads like that.

As to the pasta, I believe the whole wheat pasta I tried was Italian, but it was a long time ago. Not sure but it was before the rage of running to supposedly "healthier" types of junk.
Ditto. There is one whole wheat/grain bread that I do love and that's the Brownberry Oatnut, which is surprisingly delicious for a bread that's made with whole wheat flour.
 
I don't like steak. The texture is too chewy, and I keep finding these really tough, overly chewy bits, doesn't matter how long I chew it. I don't understand why people like steaks so much. I would much rather have chicken or pork.

Beets and bell pepper. Both have this earthy stink to me. They taste like what soil must taste like. I stay away from them even though I know they are good for me.

Also, as for kale, which a lot of people seem to hate, its bitter taste means it's very good for your liver. Our livers like bitter stuff. It's the same reason why bitter melon, which has a very unpleasantly bitter taste, is very good at detoxifying your liver.
 
You don't need to detoxify your liver. It's your liver that detoxifies your body.
Maybe detoxify isn't the right word. What I mean is that bitter-tasting food cleanses your liver, or otherwise acts as a very nice "treat" to your liver. Your liver works very hard to detoxify your body and it needs a break and some TLC for itself.
 
If it's top quality wholewheat pasta, then it's ok, but the cheaper ones are not good🙄.
I don't think anyone goes to the effort of importing the cheap stuff. ;) If we wanted nasty tasting wholewheat pasta, we could just buy the stuff made here. I will admit, that Catelli makes acceptable wholewheat pasta now. It's not as good as the Italian stuff, but it is, in my opinion, better than the white pasta made on the west side of the Atlantic.

I have no idea what it is they do to make it taste nasty. I learned to make pasta by hand in Denmark in the early 1970s. I learned it from a New York-Italian lady. When I moved to Montreal, for years, I always made my own lasagna noodles, with wholewheat flour. That always just tasted fine. Other pasta is more of a nuisance by hand, unless you get a pasta roller. I lusted after one of those for about 25 years before I could afford one. For some reason, the price just didn't seem to go up, even with inflation. It would have taken longer to afford one otherwise.
 
The curry I tried once was made with curry powder.
Right, I understand. There's 1.2 billion people is India and I'll bet no two curry powder are the same, and for the life of me that commercial yellow curry powder hasn't changed in 50 years and it's probably the worst option and tasting curry to be indoctrinated into Indian cuisine. :giggle:
 
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