I'm making raspberry jam or puree

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blissful

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I'm not posting a question, just that I'm making a raspberry puree/jam to get the frozen berries (from the vines) out of the freezer and into jars.


There's 3 methods of making it before the waterbath process for canning.
A jam. Using pectin and sugar, use approve methods.
A puree. Using lemon, cooking it down a little, use approved method for puree of fruits.

The old fashioned jam making, getting it to a temperature of 220 deg F.


I'm using the third method and adding honey for sweetness, near the end of the process.


In an electric roaster (today), or on the stove with a triple bottomed pan, it takes about 5-6 hours to reduce the volume by half and get the temperature up above boiling temperature. It's just easier to do with the electric roaster with the non stick finish. A little less stirring.


Sometimes I thicken a very concentrated berry jam adding apples or pears for an increase in volume and texture.


I'll be canning these tonight. It's so hot and HUMID here, I'll be cooling off in the bedroom with AC and going to the kitchen to get it done. Waterbath canning.


Raspberry is one of our favorite flavors, along with cherry and strawberry flavors too. The house smells delicious.
 

dragnlaw

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Do you have a sheltered area near the kitchen, with a plug? Could you do your reducing out there for a couple of hours.

I did onions in the slow cooker in the garage one year. I like the smell of onions but some of the others didn't... too bad, so sad!

ps
that puree sounds wonderful... I can almost smell it now.
 

blissful

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Dragnlaw, good idea.....I could move it outside. I keep my dehydrator outside, currently with lemon balm and yarrow in it.


Having it outside is good for onions, and especially garlic. We once dried our garlic in the garage, it was way too strong with our humidity in there.



My son came up from the basement and I asked him if he liked the smell. He said it was very very strong, but good.
 

dragnlaw

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We have our garlic down in the shed right now. I wanted to move it to the garage where "perhaps" the humidity is a bit lower. However, my son has several jerry cans in there - I don't want them to pick up that gasoline smell!

One of the few smell I cannot abide - gasoline and especially diesel!

edit, :doh:
can you believe, I went changed all the z'to s's in gasoline, then from s to z and now going back to change them again from z to s

go take a nap, dragn..
 
Last edited:

bethzaring

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In the early evening tonight, I will be working up about 10 pounds of large white onions for the crockpot. I shred the onions in the food processor and need to run the kitchen exhaust fan while shredding! The onions will caramelize overnight and I will can them in the morning. Neither of us mind the overwhelming aroma of onions.
 

dragnlaw

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In this heat and humidity I hate to turn the oven on. but bread has been calling me.

So I try to do it early in the day, have the exhaust fan going all the time. By the time they get home, other than the aroma, which is of course, loved, they can't tell the kitchen is hotter than any other day. A/C is running all this time.
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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I made a raspberry jam one summer, trying both a chinois, and a ricer lined with cheesecloth to remove the seeds. The resultant jam was superb. The work to get the seeds out took more muscular strength than i have anymore.

Do you remove the seeds from your raspberry jam; and if so, by what method?

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

blissful

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Chief, I don't remove the seeds at all. We both eat high fiber plant based, so they really don't bother us in any way.

This year was our second year with the raspberry plants. We harvested about 8 qts which is a pretty good harvest for the second year. We're expecting doubling that or better next year (2-20 ft trellises), and then maybe I'll consider giving it a try, to remove the seeds.
 

GinnyPNW

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Do you ever make Swedish Cream, Blissful? I make a recipe from the Timberline Lodge. Topped with Raspberry puree, it is divine! Or just mix the puree into the pudding. Yum!
 

blissful

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Do you ever make Swedish Cream, Blissful? I make a recipe from the Timberline Lodge. Topped with Raspberry puree, it is divine! Or just mix the puree into the pudding. Yum!


I bet is does taste divine!

I really don't use dairy for anything.

The puree/jam such a concentrated flavor and color, you're right, it would be a treat into a pudding. We do make a rice pudding w/soy milk, water, cinnamon, honey and it would be something special to top it with the raspberry puree. Thumbprint cookies, on toast, spread on baked pancakes...and I haven't tried it on our black bean brownies yet.
 

GinnyPNW

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I bet is does taste divine!

I really don't use dairy for anything.

The puree/jam such a concentrated flavor and color, you're right, it would be a treat into a pudding. We do make a rice pudding w/soy milk, water, cinnamon, honey and it would be something special to top it with the raspberry puree. Thumbprint cookies, on toast, spread on baked pancakes...and I haven't tried it on our black bean brownies yet.

Ooooo...what a wonderful list to look forward to for the future!
 

taxlady

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GinnyPNW

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It sounds delicious. I wonder why it's called Swedish.

I looked in the Timberline Lodge Cookbook, but it doesn't give that info. Just other ways to enjoy it, by trying other fruits, swirling them, etc. I bought that cookbook because we tried the Swedish Cream at the Lodge and loved it. When I saw the cookbook for sale and it had that recipe included, sold!

If you make it, be careful with measuring the gelatin! Don't do what I did the 2nd time I made it and used the full packet. Didn't seem like that much more!?

The do sell teeny-tiny cups of it in the local market called New Seasons. They charge $7 for that itsy-bitsy taste! I've never bought it from them. Maybe it is worth it...maybe not?
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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It looks like stabilized Chantilly Cream with added sour cream, which would give it more body, and a more complex flavor. It looks great. I can see this surrounding fresh berries.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

dragnlaw

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Each a bit different -

Russian Cream
Boston Cream
Bavarian Cream
Swedish Cream or Krem
Italian Cream

someone said on one of the blogs... if creme brûlée and panna cotta had a genetically perfect baby, it would be called Swedish Cream.

:LOL::LOL:
 

taxlady

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I came across a Danish recipe today that I think the Swedish cream may have originally been based on. It's a dish that uses buttermilk and whipped cream. I was beginning to feel that I recognized the flavour profile of the Swedish cream recipe, but I was pretty sure that sour cream was not involved. It's not used a lot in Scandinavia. They are more likely to use crème fraiche or other cultured milk products.
 

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