ISO help w/cream-cheese whipped cream

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neptune

Cook
Joined
Nov 27, 2014
Messages
91
Location
Georgia
In this month's Cook's Country, there's a recipe for Blueberry Cream Pie. I tried making it, but ran into some serious trouble with the topping. Here's that part of the recipe.

-------------------------
TOPPING
8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 1⁄4 cups (1.75 ounces) sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 cup heavy cream, chilled

Using stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, whip cream cheese, sugar, and vanilla on medium-high speed until very smooth, about 2 minutes, scraping down bowl as needed. With mixer running, slowly pour in cream and whip until stiff peaks form, 1 to 3 minutes, scraping down bowl as needed.
--------------------------

It says to beat until "stiff peaks" form. Well, that must be a joke! :LOL: The best I could get was the consistency of thin sour cream—even after popping the mixture into the freezer for a while. I'm an experienced cook, and rarely have trouble getting cream to whip. I think the problem here may be the 1-to-1 ratio of whipping cream to cream cheese.

I searched the Web, and it seems that just about every other recipe for this kind of thing either:

1) Uses a ratio of at least 2-to-1 of whipping cream to cream cheese; or
2) Says to beat the whipping cream BEFORE adding the cream cheese—or else to beat them both separately and then fold them together.

Thankfully, even though the topping is thin, it's still serviceable, so the pie is edible at least. :chef: But does anybody have any insight into what might've gone wrong? No matter how cold I got the mixture, that didn't seem to improve the whipping much. Thanks for any help.

One thing I did want to mention is that I used homemade cream cheese in this recipe, according to this protocol:

https://www.culturesforhealth.com/learn/cheese/homemade-cream-cheese/

But I've made this kind of cream cheese many times before and also strained it for over 12 hours, so I don't think that was the problem.
 

JonasStax

Senior Cook
Joined
Apr 11, 2022
Messages
102
Location
Kings Park
https://www.americastestkitchen.com/authors/193-jessica-rudolph

Jessica Rudolph is an associate editor for Cook's Country. She's worked for America’s Test Kitchen since 2016, where she began as a test cook on the photography team. She now develops magazine recipes, including the Dinner Tonight recipe cards in each issue of Cook's Country. She is a culinary school graduate with previous experience in restaurants, engineering, and fanatical home cooking.

Baking is chemistry. The logical cause is a chemical reaction between ingredients. In the test kitchen the recipe worked with the test ingredients. Substitute ingredients, there is a different chemical reaction. Beating ingredients separately and gently folding together avoids the chemical reaction.

Ask Cook's Country
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Do you have a kitchen, ingredient, or equipment-related question that you can’t find the answer to? We're here to help. Send your question to the editors of Cook's Country magazine. If we publish it, you'll receive a free one-year subscription.
 

neptune

Cook
Joined
Nov 27, 2014
Messages
91
Location
Georgia
Ask Cook's Country
https://www.cookscountry.com/ask

Do you have a kitchen, ingredient, or equipment-related question that you can’t find the answer to? We're here to help. Send your question to the editors of Cook's Country magazine. If we publish it, you'll receive a free one-year subscription.

I e-mailed the editors of Cook's Country about my experience as well. We'll see if they ever respond. ;)
 
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