Italian Yeast product - Help!

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
12,711
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
I bought this quite a while ago. There was nothing else on the shelf. When I got home the instructions were very confusing and I never did anything with it. It is past its due date but imagine I could still use it - if I only knew how.

It' is talking about using a percentage of this for that - at which point I said - nope, to the back of the cupboard you go.
Now I'm feeling guilty, I bought this, I should use it.

Can someone (in Italy maybe? other countries? ) be familiar with this? Know how to use it? Can give a person with limited comprehensions of instructions on how to use? NO percentages! (please)

Please help me get rid of my guilt, please?
 
The curve on the can makes it very hard to photograph.
Here's the best I can do (don't have time for photo shop right now)
and sorry - I did take and forgot to post. Arghhh!
20231108_192709.jpg
20231109_075921.jpg
20231109_080020-EDIT.jpg


Hope y'all got good eyesight!
 
First thought was just active dry yeast by the looks of it.
Prob 7 gram per kg flour for fairly quick bread. To be reduced to a lot less if you give the dough more time to rise
Although package seems to say 10%? In which case it has been diluted dramatically with something
 
It looks very much like that dcSaute. Very powdery contents and don't know how to describe the scent.

I get the impression it is sourdough powder with the yeast.
Honestly, I'm just not experienced nor adventurous enough to try and figure it all out.

Not to mention as soon as you say use 10% for every (..something..) my brain shuts down.
 

Preparation​


BREAD PREPARATION INSTRUCTIONS
YOU NEED: 500 g of flour for bread, 50 g of dry sourdough and yeast mix, 10 g of salt, 300 ml of water.
BREAD WITH SOURDOUGH – PREPARATION BY HAND
Pour into a bowl 500 g of flour for bread, 50 g of sourdough, 10 g of salt and 300 ml of water. Mix well and knead for about 10 minutes until the dough is smooth and homogeneous. Form the loaf, cover it and leave to rise for 120-180 minutes on a baking tray overed with baking paper in a warm place.
Place a saucepan of water in the oven and preheat it. Take out the saucepan
just before baking the bread. Bake the bread at 425°F for 25-30 minutes.
BREAD WITH SOURDOUGH – PREPARATION WITH BREAD MACHINE
Pour 300 ml of water into the bread machine tank, in a bowl mix 500 g of flour
for bread, 50 g of sourdough and 10 g of salt. Pour the flour mix into the tank
and start the classic bread program (minimum 2 hours and a half).

50 grams flour/yeast mix equals 6 3/8 tablespoons.
500 grams flour is 4 cups.
300 grams water is 1 and 1/4 cup.
 
I've never seen a package with"yeast mix" written on it,but it could just be the English translation of the Italian "lievitino" or "lievito madre" which is in fact leavened sour dough, used as yeast for bread-making. It's much more effective than ordinary brewers' yeast (dried or fresh).
What I don't understand is that your product doesn't seem to need refrigerating, which is where sourdough should be stored (after it has risen).
I see from the ingredients that brewers yeast has been added.
It seems like a good, useful product, but I wouldn't use if it's way past the sell-by date. It shouldn't be toxic, but the yeast will probably have no effect.
 
well, I don't really know what "dry sourdough" is - but it does not sound like it needs fridging . . .
 
blissful - Thank You! You put it into 'dragn language' - much appreciated.

the company sez' info here
but there's nothing about the yeast.

for 500g flour . . . "50g of dry sourdough and yeast mixture"
what is 'dry sourdough????"
apparent the can contains a mixture of yeast + pulverized? sourdough . . .
for making imitation sourdough bread?
If you look at the picture in dcSaute's post and look at the picture I posted - you will see that there is a label stuck on to the front of the canister. I originally though it was a translation of Italian for the North American market. No, not at all - they were just covering up the 'sourdough' part of the label. I peeled it off and it is exactly the same as dcSaute's.

Why on earth would they want to remove the reference to sourdough? It now makes perfect sense when you read the instructions! :)whistlingbut bliss' instructions are by far much better ;) )

Thank you all - once I get the gingerbread mania out of the way I will be trying it!
 
I've seen something about dry sourdough.
Apparently you take your sourdough starter, spread it out thinly on baking powder and then let it dry out.
Once dehydrated, you crumble it and it keeps well (they said)

I've not tried it, but it came up in a discussion in a baking forum when I was worried about keeping my sourdough without access to a fridge or freezer
 
I've seen something about dry sourdough.
Apparently you take your sourdough starter, spread it out thinly on baking powder and then let it dry out.
Once dehydrated, you crumble it and it keeps well (they said)

I've not tried it, but it came up in a discussion in a baking forum when I was worried about keeping my sourdough without access to a fridge or freezer
I saw something similar years ago where pioneer folks soaked cloth in sourdough starter and hung it up to dry.

When they needed yeast they would cut a piece and add it to some flour and water to reconstitute it and let it ferment for a day or two creating a new batch of sourdough starter.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top Bottom