Kosher Laws

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norgeskog

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Psiguyy said:
If it's a kosher event, absolutely avoid milk, beef, and pork. Safer to stick with precooked fish and chicken for the meats.

As for precooked add-ins, that's up to you. Depending on the ingredient, I like to precook some and stick with raw for others. For instance, I prefer cooked mushrooms to raw.

In some kosher circles, chicken is considered meat and cannot be used with milk. Fish, especially smoked salmon or lox is the good choice.
 

Psiguyy

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norgeskog said:
Psiguyy said:
If it's a kosher event, absolutely avoid milk, beef, and pork. Safer to stick with precooked fish and chicken for the meats.

As for precooked add-ins, that's up to you. Depending on the ingredient, I like to precook some and stick with raw for others. For instance, I prefer cooked mushrooms to raw.

In some kosher circles, chicken is considered meat and cannot be used with milk. Fish, especially smoked salmon or lox is the good choice.

Really? I didn't know that. I thought it had to do with when you mix dairy and anything that drinks mother's milk as being a problem.

OH. Maybe it's not kosher to put chicken meat in eggs since the egg comes from the chicken. Oops.

Stick with fish.
 

norgeskog

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Psiguyy said:
norgeskog said:
Psiguyy said:
If it's a kosher event, absolutely avoid milk, beef, and pork. Safer to stick with precooked fish and chicken for the meats.

As for precooked add-ins, that's up to you. Depending on the ingredient, I like to precook some and stick with raw for others. For instance, I prefer cooked mushrooms to raw.

In some kosher circles, chicken is considered meat and cannot be used with milk. Fish, especially smoked salmon or lox is the good choice.

Really? I didn't know that. I thought it had to do with when you mix dairy and anything that drinks mother's milk as being a problem.

OH. Maybe it's not kosher to put chicken meat in eggs since the egg comes from the chicken. Oops.

Stick with fish.

The law regarding meat dairy "do not cook a kid in its mother's milk' is the biblical basis for the meat dairy issue. Carrying it over the pountry is a rabbinical one usually followed by the orthodox. As to the egg, if it is fertalized it is considered meat, if it is not fertalized it is parve meaning neither dairy or meat and can be eaten with either one.
 

Psiguyy

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-DEADLY SUSHI- said:
I dont understand this whole kosher thing. Why cant ya mix things? It doesnt seem logical.

A lot of the kosher rules had to do with ancient food handling problems. At least that's the way I heard it explained. Kept them from getting sick from the food.
 

GB

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Psiguyy said:
-DEADLY SUSHI- said:
I doesn't understand this whole kosher thing. Why cant ya mix things? It doesnt seem logical.

A lot of the kosher rules had to do with ancient food handling problems. At least that's the way I heard it explained. Kept them from getting sick from the food.

Actually this is a common misconception. Deadly Sushi was right on when he said it doesn't seem logical. The very simple reason for the Kosher laws is because G-d said to do it that way. It has nothing to do with health or eating well or anything like that. It is just to show G-d that you will follow what G-d told you to do. This, obviously, is a very simplified explanation, but you get the gist. I got this information from Rabbi Kushner. You may have heard of him. He wrote the book "When bad things happen to good people". He is a world renown Rabbi and just happens to be the Rabbi at my temple.
 

Psiguyy

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OK. Thanks for that information. I must have been listening to the wrong people.

I have a lot more questions, but don't think this is the place to ask them. Might offend some people.
 

kitchenelf

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So many people are under the HUGE misconception that it's when a Rabbi blesses what is being made - (even my Jewish friend who actually has never practiced - I swear I can't get her to believe me) - Long but thorough explanation here.

This is an excellent explanation without going into itty bitty detail.
 

buckytom

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hi everyone! just popped in for a second. hope everyone's having a good week so far. i'm really worried about luv's. hope she's ok.

just remember, that the things that cannot be served together or not at all in a kosher house cannot be prepared and served on the came cutting boards and dishes either.

so making diced ham for the omelet is a no no on the same cutting board as the rest of the kosher stuff...
 

Audeo

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Hey, bucky! Good to see you! Happy Thanksgiving!!!

PS: Bug's found a cake with your name on it down in Desserts...another jewel from Rainee... ;)
 

GB

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buckytom said:
just remember, that the things that cannot be served together or not at all in a kosher house cannot be prepared and served on the came cutting boards and dishes either.

so making diced ham for the omelet is a no no on the same cutting board as the rest of the kosher stuff...

While this is true, there are variations in how strict people keep kosher. There are degrees with everything. If someone were to keep completely kosher according to the Torah then in todays world they would probably have to grow and make most of their own food. What most people do is do the best they can. I have a Rabbi friend who decided that she will still eat at friends houses who do not keep kosher, but she will only eat foods that are kosher, so even though she is eating a salad off a plate that had bacon on it that morning she is OK with that. She feels that it is more important to try to do your best without completely isolating yourself from everyone else. Most people who keep kosher these days know that unless it is a kosher kitchen, that what they eat might not fit the strictest interpretation of the kosher laws, and they make their own decisions that that is OK for them.
 

-DEADLY SUSHI-

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One would think that doing Gods work, helping others and staying close to the Lord is what matters. Not thinking about what food is on the darn cutting board. :? In my opinion doing drugs, drinking, smoking and heck even watching to much TV is more important than worrying about bacon being on the same plate as a salad. :roll:
BUT..... Im Christian, not Jewish.
 

GB

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Sushi, part of the reason is that by keeping kosher you are forced to stop and think about things before you eat. People who keep kosher think of G-d before every meal and think of their religion before every meal. That is part of how they stay close to G-d. It is not so much about the actual rules (those in and of itself are somewhat arbitrary), but more about G-d saying this is how it is and I want you to make a decision to believe me and follow what I say. My wife and I tried keeping kosher for a short while to see what it would be like. It really did make us think of our religion every single time we put something in our mouths.
 

Psiguyy

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GB, I've heard of some strict families who adhere to the rules actually have two kitchens in their homes! One for cooking certain things and the other for other things.

Two complete kitchens so the two groups of foods don't mix.

One question. Why does the rabbi have to be in a commercial kitchen and be the one who oversees everything to the point that the rabbi is the only person who can even turn on the burners?
 

GB

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Yeah some of the people who are strict about it do have two kitchens, or have two of everything in their kitchen. Two ovens, two fridges, two dishwashers, two sinks, etc. One is for meat and the other is for dairy. Not everyone can afford to do that so some people just opt to have two sets of dishes and silverware. You would not put the meat dishes in the wash with the the dairy dishes.

I have not heard that one about the rabbi in a commercial kitchen. Perhaps they need to be the one to turn on the burners to ensure that fire was not created on the sabbath with would make something not kosher. I'm not sure about that one though,
 

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