Looking for chili and beans recipe

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raggs

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Joined
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am in India so spices are not a problem however have only a single cook top to work with and have a terrific meat substitute in place of beef (beef here is impossible to get) ....a recipe for chilli and beans, not hot spicy that is savory and complex...... the limitation it seems to me is the inability to long simmer w/ beef........ thanks
 
Use canned Beans.
Cook first onions etc. first, add the spices you like, then the protien.
Dryied red chilis and cumin is popular here in Texas.
Eric. Austin, Texas.
 
Use canned Beans.
Cook first onions etc. first, add the spices you like, then the protien.
Dryied red chilis and cumin is popular here in Texas.
Eric. Austin, Texas.

Pinto beans, if you can get them. Black beans are okay. No kidney beans, please.

CD (North Texas)
 
no pinto, black beans are available, why not kidney .....?
Thanks for the cooking onion etc. first tip......
 
casey, think he's just looking for some bean recipes and chili recipes - not necessarily "authentic" Texas chili! LOL

raggs, you go ahead and put those kidney beans into anything your little heart desires! LOL
 
no pinto, black beans are available, why not kidney .....?
Thanks for the cooking onion etc. first tip......

Kidney beans are for Yankee chili. The only acceptable beans for real Texas chili (we invented the dish, and it is the official State food of Texas) are pinto beans, or if pinto beans are unavailable, black beans. If you can't get beef, a beef substitute is fine. You can use chicken, or whatever you can get. I would personally use chicken thigh meat.

This is my version of the original Texas Red chili, and a photo of my Texas Red. No beans, no tomatoes. Here is a recipe. You can adapt it to your tastes. Originally, chili was hearty chuck wagon food for hard working cowboys/vaqueros. You can also use a plant based fat, like vegetable oil, if animal fat is not something you eat.

2 ounces dried, whole dried chipotle and ancho (6 to 8 chiles), seeds removed (the seeds are bitter)
1½ teaspoons ground cumin
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Kosher salt to taste
5 tablespoons lard, rendered beef suet -- or rendered bacon fat (I use bacon fat)
2½ pounds boneless beef chuck, well trimmed and cut into ¾-inch cubes (to yield 2 pounds after trimming)
⅓ cup finely chopped onion
3 large cloves garlic, minced
2 cups beef stock , or canned low-sodium beef broth, plus more as needed
2¼ cups water, plus more as needed
2 tablespoons masa harina (corn tortilla flour)
1 tablespoon firmly packed dark brown sugar, plus more as needed
1½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar, plus more as needed

Step 1​

Place the chiles in a large skillet over medium-low heat and gently toast the chiles until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Don't let them burn or they'll turn bitter. Place the chiles in a bowl and cover them with very hot water and soak until soft, 15 to 45 minutes, turning once or twice.

Step 2​

Drain the chiles. Place the chiles in the bowl of a blender and add the cumin, black pepper, 1 tablespoon salt and ¼ cup water. Purée the mixture, adding more water as needed (and occasionally scraping down the sides of the blender jar), until a smooth, slightly fluid paste forms (you want to eliminate all but the tiniest bits of skin.) Set the chile paste aside.

Step 3​

Return skillet to medium-high heat and melt 2 tablespoons of the lard/bacon fat. When it begins to smoke, swirl skillet to coat and add half of the beef. Lightly brown on at least two sides, about 3 minutes per side, reducing the heat if the meat threatens to burn. Transfer to a bowl and repeat with 2 more tablespoons of lard/bacon fat and the remaining beef. Reserve.

Step 4​

Let the skillet cool slightly, and place it over medium-low heat. Melt the remaining 1 tablespoon of lard/bacon fat in the skillet; add the onion and garlic and cook gently for 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the stock, the remaining 2 cups water and gradually whisk in the masa harina to avoid lumps. Stir in the reserved chile paste, scraping the bottom of the skillet with a spatula to loosen any browned bits. Add the reserved beef (and any juices in the bowl) and bring to a simmer over high heat. Reduce heat to maintain the barest possible simmer (just a few bubbles breaking the surface) and cook, stirring occasionally, until the meat is tender but still somewhat firm and 1½ to 2 cups of thickened but still liquid sauce surrounds the cubes of meat, about 2 to three hours.

Step 5​

Stir in the brown sugar and vinegar thoroughly and add salt to taste; gently simmer 10 minutes more. At this point, it may look like there is excess sauce. Turn off the heat and let the chili stand for at least 30 minutes, during which time the meat will absorb about half of the remaining sauce in the skillet, leaving the meat bathed in a thick, somewhat fluid sauce. Stir in additional broth or water if the mixture seems too dry. If the mixture seems a bit loose and wet, allow it to simmer a bit more (sometimes I like to partially crush the cubes of beef with the back of a spoon to let them absorb more sauce). Adjust the balance of flavors with a bit of additional salt, sugar, or vinegar, if you like.

Step 6​

Reheat gently and serve in individual bowls with an optional dollop of sour cream on top and a lime wedge on the side. Serve with some cornbread. Put some hot sauce (such as Tabasco) on the table for people who love really spicy chili to add, if they choose.

1718772584690.jpeg


Originally, pinto beans would have also been cooked separately, and served on the side, so people could mix it in, or not. Again, black beans are an acceptable substitute for pinto beans.

CD
 
casey, think he's just looking for some bean recipes and chili recipes - not necessarily "authentic" Texas chili! LOL

raggs, you go ahead and put those kidney beans into anything your little heart desires! LOL

Raggs can do anything he/she wants. The only way I know to make chili is Texas style. People do all kinds of things and call it chili. People can use tofu and garbanzo beans if they want, but it won't be chili, to me. In Cincinnati, they serve "chili" on spaghetti. :rolleyes:

I've been kicking around a recipe for Poutine using fried pickles, Kraft mac-and-cheese, and Cream of Mushroom soup. I'm sure Canadians would be fine with that. :ROFLMAO:

CD
 
I'm glad that some help came from our posts - afraid you got only one good recipe out of all that. What did you do in the end? How did you make your beans?
Please, curious minds need to know.
 
Gave the pinto beans away and went with canned black beans, salt, pepper, cumin, ripe tomatoes, tomato paste, garlic, 1 oz.jaggery ( palm)sugar, teaspoon Habanero hot sauce and a meat substitute called Bytes cut very small ........combined all and let cook for 2 hrs on low heat added Bytes and continued to cook for 2 hrs ........topped with soft cheddar ......desert was a white cake w/ fresh mango
and cream topped with crushed walnut, cashew, almond ........
( a bit dry ) but delicious......thanks again
 
Though I'm not familiar with your location in India, @raggs, I do know that kidney beans are one of the most popular "large" beans (not dal, that is), especially in the northern territories (I assume it doesn't like heat, as much as others), and pintos I don't even see in Indian markets here, which have countless types of legumes, almost all of which I've tried, out of curiosity! And in recent years, black beans have shown up in many of them; even though they aren't in traditional Indian dishes, I guess they are becoming popular, and I can see why! A favorite of mine, I've used them in many Indian, as well as Tex-Mex dishes. And just use what you like!
I have a few canned ones, but I cook most of them dried, because I'm cheap! And the price of canned beans around here almost doubled (more than doubled some places) when the pandemic hit, and never came down. Yet the dried ones only increased a little.
 
And in recent years, black beans have shown up in many of them; even though they aren't in traditional Indian dishes, I guess they are becoming popular, and I can see why! A favorite of mine, I've used them in many Indian, as well as Tex-Mex dishes.

Black beans have become a lot more common in Texas chilis over the last 20-something years. They have good flavor, and are a similar texture to pinto beans, when cooked. That is something I should have mentioned before. Kidney beans have a tough skin, so the texture is not like pinto and black beans. I personally find that texture unpleasant. I feels like the beans are not finished cooking.

The original chili recipes would not have had tomatoes, either, as they would not have been available to cooks on the cattle drives. But today, just about everyone I know puts tomatoes (in some form) in their chili. I do sometimes, and other times I don't.

My mom was born and raised in New Jersey, and as kids, she made up chili with kidney beans, served on boil potatoes. When we moved to Texas, she learned to make chili in a more Texas way, and never went back to her previous way.

Here is an interesting video with a very basic history of chili, and the story of the "Chili Queens of San Antonio," who made chili popular.


CD
 
One of my favourite recipes using Red Kidney Beans is 3 Bean Salad. There are many, many recipes for it - some using only yellow, green, lima beans or garbanzo, etc. Some using red, white and another type. So many many of them.
 
A pretty darn good vegetarian chili


I use light red kidney beans for my chili. Don't care whether it is authentic Texan chili or not. It's what I like.
 
A pretty darn good vegetarian chili


I use light red kidney beans for my chili. Don't care whether it is authentic Texan chili or not. It's what I like.

Looks like a very tasty bean soup/stew. But, like I said, people call virtually anything chili.

I remember I once made dirty rice with ground beef, because that's what I had in the freezer that day. Someone told me it wasn't real dirty rice. :ROFLMAO:

CD
 
not a lot of success with soaked beans here .....must be the shelf life ....beans that are hard spoils the experience
as many times in India the Masala in everything from bread to sweets has become predictably boring... most of the well prepared dishes have well balanced flavor given so many spices....Deepak Chopra has a wonderful chick pea dahl although the prep time is a bit inhibiting.....
nice to have so much feed back .....thanks for the vid
 
Looks like a very tasty bean soup/stew. But, like I said, people call virtually anything chili.

I remember I once made dirty rice with ground beef, because that's what I had in the freezer that day. Someone told me it wasn't real dirty rice. :ROFLMAO:

CD
Didn't name it...

And I'm guessing you mean me. Sad that you remember something that happened so long ago that it's not even a blip to me.
 
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