MY Spaghetti Sauce

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Termy

Senior Cook
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Jun 26, 2021
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Parma, Ohio
I cannot call this a recipe because I can't nail down all the amounts etc.

Even so, I figure a nice pot of sauce worth even making is about 48oz. sauce, canned but a good brand, Cento or whatever with NO SUGAR. long with that goes almost as much canned whole tomatoes, and as you put them in you cut them in half. But all that comes later.

First, in a small pot put water. Then take dried rosemary and fennel seeds and make a bag for them out of a coffee filter. Boil until the water get dark. Retain bag for future use, they work several times. It method keeps those ungrindable, unchewable, get stuck in your teethable little stems out of the sauce. The fennel seeds are not as bad but just stick them in there.

Once that is ready, you have been cutting up onion and garlic, at least a whole one each and have put them in the food processor, they go in that rosemary tea. They cook as you prepare the spices. Now for the batch size I said, the spices are;

1 tbsp.+1 tsp. Oregano
1 tbsp.+1 tsp. Basil
1 tbsp.+1 tsp. Thyme
1 tbsp.+1 tsp. Celery seed
2 tsp Cayenne ground (or lil bit mo...>:->)

Once all that is in, it is time to make the meatballs.

Of course you need everything there, meat, egg(s), breadcrumbs without sugar, Little bit mozzerella and romano.

Process up another, wait, what scale are we on ? If you like the meatballs you'll love having extras, so.. With all the ingredients, one meatball is approximately one ounce. They can be bigger but this is a nice size, want more take another.

So a "pound" of ground meat makes 16. Our pounds are a bit big here. Probably closer to ½kg.

So that warrants ½ a big onion and ½ a garlic.

First mix all the dry stuff up with the meat. Onion, garlic, cheeses, (to taste) everything but the egg and the breadcrumbs. For a whole pound two eggs is warranted. So then after that is mixed in and thoroughly all over you you start adding breadcrumbs until it reaches the consistency you want - have to make spheres, remember ?

Once that is done it goes into a fry pan and is fried, or some people put them in the oven but I am not sure it works as well.

Then the sausage, hot or mild, please no sweet. The best one around her I found was Lou's, it comes in package with four links, longer than a CD width but not, well almost a 45 record, they called them 7" and that sounds close. So since i got 16 balls, I cut each link into ¼ths. Now I got 16 and 16. Fry up sausage and throw in, cook a couple more hours.

In fact, on cooking; With or without meat this stuff will scum up because of the tomatoes. Leave it for a time. Let some grease come up and make it dark and one piece that comes right out BUT LEAVE THE GREASE and in fact stir it in.

If it is not thick enough leave the lid off.

Sometimes I have added pieces of pork, (8, or 12, or...) but have not lately, didn't feel like it. And I am sick of pork loin. Y'know, complain about meat that has too coarse a grain, and then get this you will be sorry what you asked for. I used to put in western style ribs, which I think is/was shoulder. They had them boneless or not. Haven't seen them in a while

Anyway, probably a good time to start the rest, salad, garlic bread, and the spaghetti. Now this is kinda important. When you make the pasta it will still be full of water. You put it on the plate looks nice and dry and when the sauce goes on there is a bunch of water at the bottom of the plate. That is because the weight of the water squoze out the moisture in the pasta. So what many do is to bake the pasta after it is done.

Licensing: License has a rule that the first time this sauce is eaten when first made, that it will be eaten with spaghetti, though linguini or angel hair is fine. This only applies to the first time.

T
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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Another option for cooking the pasta, and one that use, is to add another 1 1/2 cups of water to the sauce, and add the pasta to the watery sauce. The pasta hydrates by absorbing the excess water, and at the same time, releasing starch into the sauce, which makes it adhere to the sauce, and thickens it more, for a very rich, and tasty pasta with marinara, and meatballs.

I also use tomato puree, and both chopped, and crushed tomato, as they are unseasoned, allowing me to flavor the sauce the way I prefer, and not with the flavorings added to canned tomato sauce.

I like your recipe though. It looks close to my own, but with minor changes.

Seeeeya; Chuef Longwind of the North
 

skilletlicker

Head Chef
Joined
Aug 28, 2005
Messages
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Location
Memphis, TN
meatballs made with 50% ground veal makes a tender version, all beef is too rubbery for me. You ever tried veal ?

On July 15 Helen Rennie posted a Q&A YouTube video. 25:56 minutes in, related to a meatball question she mentions using gelatin as an alternative to veal to prevent "rubbery meatballs."

I haven't tried this yet or even heard of it until two days ago but thought it worth mentioning here.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpFhaLgSITg
 

Termy

Senior Cook
Joined
Jun 26, 2021
Messages
303
Location
Parma, Ohio
"Another option for cooking the pasta, and one that use, is to add another 1 1/2 cups of water to the sauce, and add the pasta to the watery sauce"

I don't like that idea. In fact the sauce and pasta are still separate when they hit my plate. I don't mix it all up. Sometimes I have dry pasta with a piece of sausage or whatever. Other times (forkfulls) I drown the noodles.

T
 

bethzaring

Master Chef
Joined
Apr 18, 2005
Messages
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Location
Northern New Mexico
Another option for cooking the pasta, and one that use, is to add another 1 1/2 cups of water to the sauce, and add the pasta to the watery sauce. The pasta hydrates by absorbing the excess water, and at the same time, releasing starch into the sauce, which makes it adhere to the sauce, and thickens it more, for a very rich, and tasty pasta with marinara, and meatballs.

I also use tomato puree, and both chopped, and crushed tomato, as they are unseasoned, allowing me to flavor the sauce the way I prefer, and not with the flavorings added to canned tomato sauce.

I like your recipe though. It looks close to my own, but with minor changes.

Seeeeya; Chuef Longwind of the North


This is the method I use to cook lasagna noodles. I layer regular dry lasagna noodles to the layering process of making lasagna, add about 1 cup of water around the edges of the lasagna pan, cover and bake. It works very well, and you don't mess with precooking the noodles.
 

karadekoolaid

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Caracas
OK - help me out here, as I´m a bit confused with US terminology sometimes and need to learn! Sauce, marinara, gravy... I get lost.
Your first line says "spaghetti sauce", but the recipe is for meatballs.
You also mention Cheddar cheese - do you put that into your meatballs?
How does the flavour of the celery seeds come through? They´re pretty intense.
Thanks again.
 

Cooking Goddess

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Don't feel confused, kara, sometimes we confuse ourselves.

"Sauce" is a generic term. It can mean a meat sauce, vodka, Bolognese - very general until you name the specific kind. Marinara is a thin tomato based sauce with subtle herb seasoning. "Gravy" refers to Sunday Gravy, the name given to spaghetti sauce by natives in and around Boston, MA. Then again, "Bostonian" can sometimes be its own language...
 

GotGarlic

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Southeastern Virginia
Don't feel confused, kara, sometimes we confuse ourselves.

"Sauce" is a generic term. It can mean a meat sauce, vodka, Bolognese - very general until you name the specific kind. Marinara is a thin tomato based sauce with subtle herb seasoning. "Gravy" refers to Sunday Gravy, the name given to spaghetti sauce by natives in and around Boston, MA. Then again, "Bostonian" can sometimes be its own language...
I thought Sunday gravy was the tomato sauce that cooked all day (traditionally started Sunday morning and left to simmer while everyone went to church) with sausage and meatballs in it. Italians in New Jersey call it that.
 

karadekoolaid

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A few pictures in this link aren't red. But then there are always a few that can't grasp the concept. ;)

Aha - gravy in the UK is a brown sauce made from what´s left in the roasting tin after making roast beef, or lamb, or chicken. It´s usually thickened with a flour mix, or a bit of cornstarch. Or sometimes, just straight out of a packet !
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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I've come to understand:

Sunday Gravy is A Boston/East coast term. We just called it spaghetti sauce.

Ragu is basically a Marinara with ground meat, usually ground beef where I grew up, browned, and left in small chunks

Spaghetti Sauce is the same as ragu, except it can contain meatballs, or sausages instead of ground beef, and can be a smooth tomato based sauce, seasoned usually with oregano, basil, rosemary, thyme, garlic, and onion, and other herbs and spices, depending on th cook.. It can have chunky tomato, or pureed, or crushed tomato, and any added veggies are left in small chunks. Mushrooms are often added, and sometimes sweet bell peppers. It can be served separately from the pasta noodles, or mixed in prior to serving.

Bolognaise Sauce is similar to a ragu, but with a béchamel, and cream added, along with carrot, and chunks of meat, rather than ground meat.

Gravy, where I grew up meant a thick, brown sauce made with a brown roux, and thinned with beef stock, or broth, or other meat broth. What I grew up thinking of as gravy, is actually either an Espagnole, or volute', unless it's pan gravy made from the drippings of what was cooked in the pan, i.e. sausage gravy, Swiss steak, chicken fried stake, chicken gravy, etc.

It truly gets complicated when sauces become mops, or soup base, bone broth, consume', mole', etc. And this doesn't even start to address different versions from other parts of the world.

Sauce is truly a generic term that can be anything from a mother, or daughter sauce, to Sunday Gravy, to cheese sauce, to Sriracha, or any of the commercially available hot sauces. A sauce can be thin and watery, to almost thick enough to stand up a spoon.

You know that liquid that surrounds a good pot of baked beans, or the pasty tomato coating on many pizzas, they are sauces too. Put together mustard and honey, and you have a classic BBQ sauce. Salad dressing (Miracle Whip), and horseradish gives you horseradish sauce. I could go on for pages. I think you get the idea.:mrgreen: I hope this has been helpful.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
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GotGarlic

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Aha - gravy in the UK is a brown sauce made from what´s left in the roasting tin after making roast beef, or lamb, or chicken. It´s usually thickened with a flour mix, or a bit of cornstarch. Or sometimes, just straight out of a packet !
It's the same in most of the United States. Italian Americans in the northeast call it Sunday gravy, sometimes gravy for short.
 
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