Orange Cranberry Bread glaze.

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Cooking4Fun

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I tried this recipe. Turned out pretty good, but I don't think the glaze was very good. Might of been better plain. As it turns out powdered sugar is less sweet than granulated sugar and may spike glucose more. Anyway to make glaze with granulated sugar?
 

I tried this recipe. Turned out pretty good, but I don't think the glaze was very good. Might of been better plain. As it turns out powdered sugar is less sweet than granulated sugar and may spike glucose more. Anyway to make glaze with granulated sugar?
What didn't you like about the glaze? Maybe remove the orange flavorings.

Powdered sugar isn't really less sweet, both are 98% sucrose, it's just less dense, half as dense actually where a tablespoon is about half the calories of granulated sugar (30 vs 60 cals) and in that recipe it calls for 1 cup of powdered sugar and if you replace it with granulated it will have twice the calories and of course twice the amount of total sugar called for in that recipe.

Also not sure what you mean about powdered sugar spiking glucose more, sugar contains glucose though. Sugar spikes insulin from the rise of glucose in the blood, so I suspect you meant a spike (rise) in blood sugar from the consumption of glucose. In that respect no, it's not going to spike insulin more simply because if consuming the same amount, powdered is less dense and delivers fewer calories and therefore as it relates to glucose will actually deliver less glucose into the bloodstream which will facilitate a smaller or less response. The problem is of course the bread which if your worried about spiking blood sugar this should be your main focus and concern and not the glaze in particular. The calories in 1 slice of that bread is probably in the 200-300 range, although the recipe says 441 and the calories in the glaze that happens to get applied to the top of that 1 slice might be 40 or 50 cals. :)
 
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I imagine that "spike glucose" is a reference to glyceminc load or index. Maybe the cornstarch found in most North American powdered sugar has a higher glycemic load or index that sucrose does. Remember, we need to compare the amount of table sugar and powdered sugar by weight, not by volume.
 
I imagine that "spike glucose" is a reference to glyceminc load or index. Maybe the cornstarch found in most North American powdered sugar has a higher glycemic load or index that sucrose does. Remember, we need to compare the amount of table sugar and powdered sugar by weight, not by volume.
There is no spiking of glucose regardless of it's load, it's the consumption of that glucose (sugar) that creates the "spike" in blood sugar.

Cornstarch does have a higher GI but the amount used for consumption purposes would be negligible considering a cup of sugar requires around 1 tbsp of cornstarch and the difference wouldn't effect the load.

I agree weight is the best way to measure but this recipe asks for 1 cup and not grams. Regular sugar will weight twice as much and have twice the calories and that's a problem if someone wasn't in the know.
 
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What didn't you like about the glaze? Maybe remove the orange flavorings.

Powdered sugar isn't really less sweet, both are 98% sucrose, it's just less dense, half as dense actually where a tablespoon is about half the calories of granulated sugar (30 vs 60 cals) and in that recipe it calls for 1 cup of powdered sugar and if you replace it with granulated it will have twice the calories and of course twice the amount of total sugar called for in that recipe.

Also not sure what you mean about powdered sugar spiking glucose more, sugar contains glucose though. Sugar spikes insulin from the rise of glucose in the blood, so I suspect you meant a spike (rise) in blood sugar from the consumption of glucose. In that respect no, it's not going to spike insulin more simply because if consuming the same amount, powdered is less dense and delivers fewer calories and therefore as it relates to glucose will actually deliver less glucose into the bloodstream which will facilitate a smaller or less response. The problem is of course the bread which if your worried about spiking blood sugar this should be your main focus and concern and not the glaze in particular. The calories in 1 slice of that bread is probably in the 200-300 range, although the recipe says 441 and the calories in the glaze that happens to get applied to the top of that 1 slice might be 40 or 50 cals. :)
I read the process of making powdered sugar from refining the granulated destroys the molecules making it taste less sweet. The glaze tastes kind of bitter. Tasted better on bread next day though.
 
I read the process of making powdered sugar from refining the granulated destroys the molecules making it taste less sweet. The glaze tastes kind of bitter. Tasted better on bread next day though.
That sounds like a guess from someone who doesn't know a lot about science. The reason powdered sugar tastes less sweet (if anyone can even detect this) is more likely because the added cornstarch dilutes its flavor somewhat. Grinding granulated sugar into powdered sugar doesn't change it at the molecular level. Both are 100% sucrose.
 
I read the process of making powdered sugar from refining the granulated destroys the molecules making it taste less sweet. The glaze tastes kind of bitter. Tasted better on bread next day though.
Like I said earlier, powdered sugar tastes less sweet because your consuming less, half as much actually if using tbsps or cups for measurements, like in your recipe here. The bitter was probably the orange zest.
 

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