Philly Cheesesteak - suggestions?

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KatyCooks

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When I first visited Arizona and saw a full size replica of a wagon that would have been the kind used by the settlers, I was just gripped by how difficult it would have been to cook at all - let alone use "measurements" the way we do today. (I was also astonished how they managed at all, given the extreme heat and with no electricity - air conditioning is everywhere in AZ!)
 

dragnlaw

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Katy, don't think they ever "cooked" in the wagons. It was pretty much always outside over the fire.

Ginny, like that recipe! Have put it on my list. Thanks!

I've never had a Philly but I thought they were served smothered in gravy?
 

KatyCooks

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Oh no, I know they didn't cook in the wagons, but they had to carry their whole lives in them, so the space must have been precious. Imagine putting your whole life (and your family's) in one of those wagons and enduring those journeys! (No doctors, no emergency services at all.) I think the people who survived must have been a mixture of lucky and very, very tough!
 

taxlady

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Honestly, the thing that annoys me about Canadian metric in recipes, is that it is often cups converted to ml. That is absolutely useless to me. I have liquid measuring cups with metric and US measure on them. So, for liquids, I use the same measuring cups for both systems. For dry measure, who wants to try to measure flour to a line on a glass cup? Who has dry measuring cups in really oddball numbers of ml? Just give me the grams for the dry stuff.

Also, if I am measuring salt, where it makes a difference in volume, between types of salt, then grams absolutely are the way to go. Don't tell me 3 tblsps of some brand of kosher salt and that it will be fewer tablespoons of table salt. Just tell me how many grams, then the size and shape of the salt crystals won't matter.

Sorry for the rant, but making stuff more complicated than it could be really bugs me.
 

Andy M.

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The flour nutrition label will give you a conversion. e.g. the King Arthur AP flour bag tells me ¼ C of flour is 30 gr. That's 120 gr/cup.
 

Roll_Bones

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@Roll_Bones, if you don't partially freeze the meat before you slice it, how does it not wiggle while you are slicing? I don't understand why it wouldn't wiggle just because the knife is very sharp. Or, are you slicing already cooked sirloin?
Sharp knife no wiggle. I have always seen people suggesting to put in freezer to make the job easier. But its already easy for me. Sharp knife is all it takes.
Maybe I'm not slicing it as thin as I should? I would say under 1/8th inch. Maybe less.
BTW I used my Chefs Choice knife sharpener yesterday. I only use it twice a year. Now it can go into storage downstairs.
One thing I am very glad I did many years ago - and just after joining this site way back in 2013 - was buying a set of cup measures. It means I can follow recipes from the US without having to convert - makes life much easier! How do you get on with UK/Euro recipes dragnlaw - do you convert to cups or just use a kitchen scales for lbs/ounces/kilos/grams?
I have the stainless steel cup measures as well. I use them regularly. But for any baking I use my scale. I don't measure for regular cooking. Only for baking or if I am not familiar with the dish I am preparing.
 

dcSaute

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I have this recipe in my latest Sainsburys magazine and it looks very appetising!
....

long thread strung out short, , , , sounds like you're looking for a very tasty beef to stuff a mushroom....

the "Philadelphia Cheese Steak" thing seem not at all relevant, no?

chuck roast, flat iron, whole rib steak
would be my choice of cuts.
I would not be looking at ground aka minced beef - thin slices of a tender cut nicely seasoned.
cut the long thin slices into smaller 'chunks' likely more workable for stuffing a (large) mushroom.

thin slice on the bias, salt&rest 2 hrs - season to preference, possibly saute prior to stuffing the mushroom.
I'm also veddy fond of velveting beef strips (for stir fry) in cornstarch - 1-2 hours - followed by a fast saute.
 

GotGarlic

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When I first visited Arizona and saw a full size replica of a wagon that would have been the kind used by the settlers, I was just gripped by how difficult it would have been to cook at all - let alone use "measurements" the way we do today. (I was also astonished how they managed at all, given the extreme heat and with no electricity - air conditioning is everywhere in AZ!)
Hey, Katy. If you're interested, I recently read a couple of the books in this series about people who moved west with wagon trains on the Oregon Trail. Some of it is slightly hokey 😁 but there's a lot of interesting information about how they lived. I started with the third one.
All the books in the Courage on the Oregon Trail series take place within the same wagon company's trip west and run concurrently. They can be read in any order.
 

KatyCooks

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long thread strung out short, , , , sounds like you're looking for a very tasty beef to stuff a mushroom....
Correct!
the "Philadelphia Cheese Steak" thing seem not at all relevant, no?
Turned out I was never going to be able to replicate that particular experience!
chuck roast, flat iron, whole rib steak
would be my choice of cuts.
I would not be looking at ground aka minced beef - thin slices of a tender cut nicely seasoned.
cut the long thin slices into smaller 'chunks' likely more workable for stuffing a (large) mushroom.

thin slice on the bias, salt&rest 2 hrs - season to preference, possibly saute prior to stuffing the mushroom.
Lesson learned here? Yep - use decent steak and keep it simple! (I used Ribeye steak, but actually, I ended up cutting it a bit TOO finely. Next time I would be a bit less rigorous about the chopping!)
 

dcSaute

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Apr 24, 2011
Messages
959
ayup. it's gotta' taste good before it's a stuffing . . . to taste good after it's a stuffing.

the meat, onion, seasoning, cheese wid or wid'out are fairly easy to duplicate.
but a proper Philly roll . . . those are much harder to come by.
 
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