Pork Roast:

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Sorry for any confusion @caseydog . Heres the roast I am talking about. When searching for a photo I had to use the search term "Pork Leg Roast". So my apologies. It looks like the section directly under the butt or shoulder cut. Has the thigh bone not the blade bone. Some call it a fresh ham.
Also, the shoulders we get around here have been seriously trimmed of most of the fat. And they take the skin off. Its the skin that makes a crackling.
Keep in mind the roast pictured below is very lean. In real life there is a good bit of fat under the skin.
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Standard in the US, probably. In Denmark, it's a little different. Here's a pork cuts chart from Denmark. Anything with the word "steg" in it is used for pork roast.

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Without the skin for the crackings, it isn't really traditional. Getting the "svær" right is very important to Danes.

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Traditionally Cuban pork roast was a whole pig at Christmas time. And the Sunday table was usually just the shoulder.
The reason I can remember it so well is the fat cap that got super crispy. It was and is my favorite part. The Boston butt does not have this. But does have more meat.
I think you're referring to the picnic portion of the shoulder, which is generally sold with both a fat cap and the skin on top of it. It's the skin that gets really crispy and is called chicharrones.
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Standard in the US, probably. In Denmark, it's a little different.
Sure. Maybe I should have been more specific, but the thread is primarily about American cuts and cooking. And the chart I posted doesn't include all the subprimal cuts.
 
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Sorry for any confusion @caseydog . Heres the roast I am talking about. When searching for a photo I had to use the search term "Pork Leg Roast". So my apologies. It looks like the section directly under the butt or shoulder cut. Has the thigh bone not the blade bone. Some call it a fresh ham.
Also, the shoulders we get around here have been seriously trimmed of most of the fat. And they take the skin off. Its the skin that makes a crackling.
Keep in mind the roast pictured below is very lean. In real life there is a good bit of fat under the skin.
View attachment 62716

Pork butt/Boston butt does not usually have the skin on it here, either. But is does usually have the fat cap on it. When I slow cook a pork butt in a Dutch oven or on my smoker, I leave that fat cap on. It self-bastes the meat as it renders. Any excess fat left when the cook is done, I slice off.

The picnic and ham cuts are not easy to tell apart, as they are kind of the same cut, except one comes from the front legs on the pig, and the other from the rear legs.

CD
 
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I think you're referring to the picnic portion of the shoulder, which is generally sold with both a fat cap and the skin on top of it. It's the skin that gets really crispy and is called chicharrones.
View attachment 62730
Exactly. This is what we made all the time back home. Marinated in mojo. Then roasted in the oven. I try to put the garlic under the skin. Then when it renders it really gets good.
Pork butt/Boston butt does not usually have the skin on it here, either. But is does usually have the fat cap on it. When I slow cook a pork butt in a Dutch oven or on my smoker, I leave that fat cap on. It self-bastes the meat as it renders. Any excess fat left when the cook is done, I slice off.

The picnic and ham cuts are not easy to tell apart, as they are kind of the same cut, except one comes from the front legs on the pig, and the other from the rear legs.

CD
After my post I thought about which fresh ham? Front or back? I guess the smaller ones are from the front.
But it is this cut we really like. And its the skin that makes the cracklings. I love it.
I made black beans and rice, salad and garlic bread. I couldn't find any plantains.
I like the salad right next to the beans and rice so I can pick up both on my fork. They go so great together.

Correction: I made a shoulder not a fresh ham.
 

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