Simple Stuffed Beef Rolls

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A dish very easy to make, these simple beef rolls stuffed with cooked ham, cheese and basil leaves. Balanced flavours, and the cheese inside that melts is still a plus that envelops them.

Serves: 2 | Preparation time: 10 mins | Cooking time: 25 mins

Beef meat: 4 thin slices (about 500 g in total)
Basil, fresh: 4 leaves
Garlic: 2 cloves
Dry white wine or a red dry one
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO): 3 tbsp
Italian Caciotta or Provolone or Scamorza cheese or any meltable cheese, to taste
Cooked Ham, about 80-100 g
Salt and pepper: to taste

Method

Sprinkle each slice with a pinch of salt and pepper.

Put a slice of ham, a couple of thin slices of cheese, two basil leaves on each slice, then close the rolls: start by folding in the longer sides to make sure the filling doesn’t spill out, then roll up the slice by starting at one end and moving towards the other.

Close each roll with a toothpick to secure the slices in place.

Heat up 3 tbsp of EVOO in a saucepan and brown garlic cloves.
Start by frying up the rolls on medium heat for 1 minute, turning them often to prevent they burn, then add white or red wine and let it evaporate.

Tip: better to use a wine that is room temperature, it tenderize meats.

Lower the heat, stir them to make sure they brown evenly. Il will take about 10-15 minutes. Occasionally sprinkle them with the gravy in the pan to help them cooking quicker and keep much flavour.

Tip: it’s pretty important to fry up the beef rolls on low heat, in this way they won’t become dry or hard, but they will turn out soft.

Take them off the pan and serve with whatever you prefer.
 

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A dish very easy to make, these simple beef rolls stuffed with cooked ham, cheese and basil leaves. Balanced flavours, and the cheese inside that melts is still a plus that envelops them.

Serves: 2 | Preparation time: 10 mins | Cooking time: 25 mins

Beef meat: 4 thin slices (about 500 g in total)
Basil, fresh: 4 leaves
Garlic: 2 cloves
Dry white wine or a red dry one
Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO): 3 tbsp
Italian Caciotta or Provolone or Scamorza cheese or any meltable cheese, to taste
Cooked Ham, about 80-100 g
Salt and pepper: to taste

Method

Sprinkle each slice with a pinch of salt and pepper.

Put a slice of ham, a couple of thin slices of cheese, two basil leaves on each slice, then close the rolls: start by folding in the longer sides to make sure the filling doesn’t spill out, then roll up the slice by starting at one end and moving towards the other.

Close each roll with a toothpick to secure the slices in place.

Heat up 3 tbsp of EVOO in a saucepan and brown garlic cloves.
Start by frying up the rolls on medium heat for 1 minute, turning them often to prevent they burn, then add white or red wine and let it evaporate.

Tip: better to use a wine that is room temperature, it tenderize meats.

Lower the heat, stir them to make sure they brown evenly. Il will take about 10-15 minutes. Occasionally sprinkle them with the gravy in the pan to help them cooking quicker and keep much flavour.

Tip: it’s pretty important to fry up the beef rolls on low heat, in this way they won’t become dry or hard, but they will turn out soft.

Take them off the pan and serve with whatever you prefer.

These sound wonderful! A few questions!

1. How do you serve them when you make them?
2. Do they reheat well as like something to take for lunches?
3. What do you serve them with?

It sounds like something I would love!
 
These sound wonderful! A few questions!

1. How do you serve them when you make them?
2. Do they reheat well as like something to take for lunches?
3. What do you serve them with?

It sounds like something I would love!
Ciao Kathleen,
thank you :)

You can serve them with a fresh salad or tomatoes or cooked vegetables, although I confess I love them with mashed potatoes!

You can re-heat them but I suggest you do it always on a low flame and cover them with a lid, so that the humidity inside will not make them hard or dry and the cheese inside will keep to be melted.

I hope I was helpful!
 
I don't put wine in the braciole. I put it in the cook! Nero D'Avola. At least one glass, usually more.

I think every family has a different filling recipe. My grandfather used chopped hard cooked egg and Pecorino Romano. I use spinach and scrambled egg and either provolone or fontina. Then we both would simmer them in my Grandma's sauce for 30 minutes to an hour and serve it with penne rigate and the sauce. Come to think of it I haven't made brociole in quite a while. I will have to add it to my rotation.
 
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I don't put wine in the braciole. I put it in the cook! Nero D'Avola. At least one glass, usually more.

I think every family has a different filling recipe. My grandfather used chopped hard cooked egg and Pecorino Romano. I use spinach and scrambled egg and either provolone or fontina. Then we both would simmer them in my Grandma's sauce for 30 minutes to an hour and serve it with penne rigate and the sauce. Come to think of it I haven't made brociole in quite a while. I will have to add it to my rotation.
These, however, are not the classic chops with sauce, these are simple rolls 'in bianco', that is without tomato sauce.

The version that your grandfather used to make is similar to the Neapolitan version, but without raisins and pine nuts - yes because the classic Neapolitan version also includes these two unusual ingredients :) - and I often prepare it. Your version is what I also make, apart from the scrambled eggs because I usually put hard-boiled egg or a very thin frittata.
Provolone as well as Fontina or Scamorza are great, I agree!
 
How big, length by width, should the pieces of meat be?
I would say that there is no real rule about length, it depends on the size of the slices of rump that you find at the supermarket or directly from the butcher, but the important thing is that they are cut thin - but not too much or they will break - since they must contain the filling and be so easily closed.
 
I would say that there is no real rule about length, it depends on the size of the slices of rump that you find at the supermarket or directly from the butcher, but the important thing is that they are cut thin - but not too much or they will break - since they must contain the filling and be so easily closed.

What kind of beef, what part do you use?
 
She uses top round. I asked her that question in another forum we both belong to.
 
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