St. Padraig's Day Menu 3-17-23

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Silversage

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Since corned beef and cabbage is definitely NOT IRISH, I wentt more tradritional for a holyday. Nice (but small) rare filet mignon with red wine/mushroom sauce, and a large green salad.

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Oh, man!! No one ever told me! Why do all the "Irish Pubs" offer Corned Beef & Cabbage? Hey, don't get me wrong, I'm not really a fan, but DH is...and I make it for him, every St. Patty's Day and other times too. I've learned to make a version that I can tolerate and he's thrilled. Of course, he's not Irish...

Pictures later, it is still cookin' here.
 
Oh, man!! No one ever told me! Why do all the "Irish Pubs" offer Corned Beef & Cabbage? Hey, don't get me wrong, I'm not really a fan, but DH is...and I make it for him, every St. Patty's Day and other times too. I've learned to make a version that I can tolerate and he's thrilled. Of course, he's not Irish...

Pictures later, it is still cookin' here.
The pubs in Ireland NEVER serve it. It's an American thing - New England Boiled Dinner renamed.
 
 Ginny, authentic Irish St. Paddy's Day dishes are more like Shepherd's Pie or bangers and mash, either of which are delicious  any day!

I have been wanting to duplicate a favorite dish from my childhood - Finnan Haddie. Mom would by the smoked haddock at the grocery store fish counter, easy-peasy. Not so easy for me. The only source that I found was online, $55 for 2, 1# packages. Probably a shipping charge, too, but I didn't check. Instead, I was able to get smoked trout at my local Market Basket thanks to a helpful seafood manager. I mostly followed the recipe from Serious Eats for Cullen Skink. While not exactly what I remember, the end result was delicious and will certainly be reprised. :yum: Probably with more trout since it's not as smoked or dense as Finnan Haddie.

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 Ginny, authentic Irish St. Paddy's Day dishes are more like Shepherd's Pie or bangers and mash, either of which are delicious  any day!

I have been wanting to duplicate a favorite dish from my childhood - Finnan Haddie. Mom would by the smoked haddock at the grocery store fish counter, easy-peasy. Not so easy for me. The only source that I found was online, $55 for 2, 1# packages. Probably a shipping charge, too, but I didn't check. Instead, I was able to get smoked trout at my local Market Basket thanks to a helpful seafood manager. I mostly followed the recipe from Serious Eats for Cullen Skink. While not exactly what I remember, the end result was delicious and will certainly be reprised. :yum: Probably with more trout since it's not as smoked or dense as Finnan Haddie.

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The pubs in Ireland NEVER serve it. It's an American thing - New England Boiled Dinner renamed.
For many years, that is a recipe I used: New England Boiled Dinner. (The beau before the DH.)...but recently I found another recipe that works even better...for both of us.
 
Thanks, @Silversage, but the recipe I found is much closer to Mom's version than the recipe you shared. What we had was more soup-like, served with crusty bread, not over toast points. I know she used Finnan Haddie (smoked haddock) fish, but the recipe itself was very much like Cullen Skink, a smoked fish chowder. She just referred to it as Finnan Haddie because that was the name of the fish.

While I'm trying to remember if Mom topped it with chopped, hard-cooked egg, I think those were used on just chipped beef on toast. I definitely remember that green pepper and pimento were NOT in the dish.
 
Half of a leftover pan fried chicken cutlet* on a toasted English muffin with a slice of
melted American cheese.

Pecan shortbread cookies and a glass
of ice cold skim milk for afters.

* I’m working my way through a 3# bag of individually wrapped 6oz. chicken cutlets from the local Wegman’s. They are convenient but a bit spendy. I think that I could cut and repackage a family pack of BSCB for about 1/3 the price.
 
Tonight for supper, we had Æggekage - Danish Frittata and Rugbrød with Butter. I followed a recipe for old fashioned æggekage, and then completely changed the garnishes. The old fashioned one has tomato, bacon, and chives. I put orange pepper, sausage, and scallion greens. I did follow the rest of the recipe as written, with exception of having cooked, sliced potato and sunroot (Jerusalem artichoke) at the bottom of the pan. It turned out delicious. The rugbrød (heavy, Danish, rye bread) went well with this. I think I will try the recipe for this that bakes the æggekage, rather than cooking it stove top.
 

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I also like to celebrate St. Patrick's Day with Irish rather than Irish-American food. Beef isn't traditionally something they eat a lot of, though. That's why after they immigrated to the US, they began to eat more of it - it was associated with the rich but was much more affordable.

So, I made Dublin Coddle - sausages and potatoes braised in stout beer with onions and bacon, and a citrusy salad on the side. I also made a dipping sauce with mayo, apple cider vinegar and mustard.

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I had never given it any thought that St. Patricks day was on a Friday during Lent until the Bishop of the local diocese issued an official waiver so people could enjoy corned beef and cabbage.
 
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