Substitution for orange rind?

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taxlady

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I often find recipes with orange or lemon rind. Since the rinds of citrus fruits are used to strengthen the flavour, is there a way to substitute frozen, concentrated orange juice for the juice and rind in a recipe? Any ideas of how much?
 
IMO the definative answer lies in the specifics...One might say the devil is in the details...etc. ...I think it depends on the recipe...In one recipe a substitution may be called for...in another it could be left out with no discernible difference in the end result. HTH
 
IMO the definative answer lies in the specifics...One might say the devil is in the details...etc. ...I think it depends on the recipe...In one recipe a substitution may be called for...in another it could be left out with no discernible difference in the end result. HTH

That makes sense.

This particular instance I'm looking at a recipe for orange cake that calls for the juice and rind of two oranges.
 
I have used lemon extract to substitute for lemon rind. For example 1/2 teaspoon lemon extract substitutes for 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind. It worked quite well for me. I don't know if substituting orange extract for grated orange would work the same or not.
 
If only you knew how much juice 2 oranges would measure. I'd think in cake you'd need to keep your liquid amounts equal.

I think it sounds tasty if you can pull it off.
 
I have used lemon extract to substitute for lemon rind. For example 1/2 teaspoon lemon extract substitutes for 1 teaspoon grated lemon rind. It worked quite well for me. I don't know if substituting orange extract for grated orange would work the same or not.

Thanks. I thought extract might work. I wasn't sure of the ratio. Last trip grocery shopping I couldn't find any lemon or orange extract. :ohmy:
 
That makes sense.

This particular instance I'm looking at a recipe for orange cake that calls for the juice and rind of two oranges.

The rind/zest definitely makes a difference, especially in this case where it calls for a lot. I would not omit it, unless you can find orange extract to use as a substitute.

By the way, you can zest several oranges, limes, and lemons at one time, and freeze the leftover zests. I do that all the time. Just use slightly more in recipes when using the frozen zest after defrosting. Do you have a microplane?
 
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The rind/zest definitely makes a difference, especially in this case where it calls for a lot. I would not omit it, unless you can find orange extract to use as a substitute.

By the way, you can zest several oranges, limes, and lemons at one time, and freeze the leftover zests. I do that all the time. Just use slightly more in recipes when using the frozen zest after defrosting. Do you have a microplane?

I have a lemon zester. I do that whenever I buy organic lemons or oranges. They are quite expensive ($0.99 for one organic lemon vs 5/$1.00 for regular), so I don't buy them often.

For me, the issue is that I have read that citrus fruit sent to the North is dyed. The dyes used on citrus skins are special, just for citrus skins. They don't have to meet the same standards as dyes intended for eating. :eek:

And I avoid food colouring as much as possible, even if isn't "special".
 
If only you knew how much juice 2 oranges would measure. I'd think in cake you'd need to keep your liquid amounts equal.

I think it sounds tasty if you can pull it off.

The recipe tells me that an ordinary orange has ~1 deciltre of juice. That may not be correct here, but it's for a Danish recipe, so it's good to know what the average orange would have in Denmark.
 
The recipe tells me that an ordinary orange has ~1 deciltre of juice. That may not be correct here, but it's for a Danish recipe, so it's good to know what the average orange would have in Denmark.


Hi Taxlady, I had no Idea that they dyed oranges to ship . Don't understand
why they would a orange isn't ripe untill it changes color. Have lived in florida
for 42 years have three orange trees, two lemon and one lime tree.
I would not use extract to replace orange or lemon zest you lose the natural
oils that reside only in the skin. Wish you could see the orange groves now
they are beautiful, See semi trucks daily going to the juice plant.

Josie
 
Hi Taxlady, I had no Idea that they dyed oranges to ship . Don't understand
why they would a orange isn't ripe untill it changes color. Have lived in florida
for 42 years have three orange trees, two lemon and one lime tree.
I would not use extract to replace orange or lemon zest you lose the natural
oils that reside only in the skin. Wish you could see the orange groves now
they are beautiful, See semi trucks daily going to the juice plant.

Josie

They pick them under ripe to ship or they would be awful when they got here. They don't always turn a nice colour when they ripen off the tree. Sometimes they stay mostly green.
 
Tax mate I have never heard of oranges or lemons being dyed, I do know that the non organics may be wax coated so I give them a good scrub with a brush before zesting them.
 
If you're going to make a recipe that includes orange juice and zest, buy a couple of oranges. Substitutes will won't cost less and won't taste as good.
 
If you're going to make a recipe that includes orange juice and zest, buy a couple of oranges. Substitutes will won't cost less and won't taste as good.

I'll check the price of the organic oranges, but I know they are expensive.
 

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