Two questions about Pasta

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mseaglecook

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How far in advance can you cook say lasagna noodles? If I cook them in the morning to use at night to prepare my meal should I put the cooked noodles in the refrigerator or leave them on the counter?

Also shelf stable gnocchi is it edible? I was thinking of trying some to keep some on hand for a quick last minute meal.
 
Holding cooked pasta can give mixed results.

I would assemble the lasagna in the morning and refrigerate it until it was time to bake it off.

You could also try the no boil lasagna noodles.
I’ve never used shelf stable gnocchi but I have had good results with dry tortellini.

Barilla-Classic-Non-GMO-Filled-Cheese-and-Spinach-Tortellini-Pasta-12-oz_54817520-fe1e-4840-afed-31ff08093d40.a5ea2451df3bef4e5164393fc89abc22.jpeg
 
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Holding cooked pasta can give mixed results.

I would assemble the lasagna in the morning and refrigerate it until it was time to bake it off.

You could also try the no boil lasagna noodles.
I’ve never used shelf stable gnocchi but I have had good results with dry tortellini.

Barilla-Classic-Non-GMO-Filled-Cheese-and-Spinach-Tortellini-Pasta-12-oz_54817520-fe1e-4840-afed-31ff08093d40.a5ea2451df3bef4e5164393fc89abc22.jpeg
I agree with Aunt Bea. How will you prevent pre-cooked pasta from sticking together? It's better to go ahead and assemble the whole thing.
 
I would refrigerate slightly cooked noodles in water until ready to use. I would also under cook them. If not they may get soggy.
Someone told me they put them in water dry. Then by the time they use them, they should be just right for layering. I cannot speak to either methods, as I use mine as soon as they are cool enough to handle.
 
Holding cooked pasta can give mixed results.

I would assemble the lasagna in the morning and refrigerate it until it was time to bake it off.

You could also try the no boil lasagna noodles.
I’ve never used shelf stable gnocchi but I have had good results with dry tortellini.

Barilla-Classic-Non-GMO-Filled-Cheese-and-Spinach-Tortellini-Pasta-12-oz_54817520-fe1e-4840-afed-31ff08093d40.a5ea2451df3bef4e5164393fc89abc22.jpeg
Bea,
Thanks for letting me know. I found a really interesting recipe that uses shelf stable gnocchi. I will try it and report back. Thanks for sharing your experience with me. :)
 
I treat regular dry lasagna noodles as no-boil noodles. Assemble your lasagna with dry noodles and pour 1 cup of water around the outer edge of the pan. Bake as normal. Been doing this for decades, works every time.
 
I treat regular dry lasagna noodles as no-boil noodles. Assemble your lasagna with dry noodles and pour 1 cup of water around the outer edge of the pan. Bake as normal. Been doing this for decades, works every time.
DH used to do that. But, he didn't add water to the assembled lasagna. As I understand it, he just made sure there was lots of sauce touching both sides of the regular, dry lasagna noodles.
 
I would refrigerate slightly cooked noodles in water until ready to use. I would also under cook them. If not they may get soggy.
Someone told me they put them in water dry. Then by the time they use them, they should be just right for layering. I cannot speak to either methods, as I use mine as soon as they are cool enough to handle.
I read about soaking pasta in cold water and then using it later, just by heating it in sauce or whatever. I tried it with whole wheat fusilli. They were soggy and some of them were falling apart. Maybe I let them soak too long, but I used them the same day.
 
To me, the main advantage of using cooked or fresh lasagna noodles when making lasagna is that I can easily cut them to fit better. BTW, when I can be bothered to make my own lasagna noodles, I don't boil them before I assemble the lasagna.
 
The 1 brand of shelf stable gnocchi we tried had a gummy, gluey texture to it. Been a long time so I don't remember brand name.

I did try making gnocchi with instant mashed potato flakes per the ATK or Cook's Country recipe a while ago. It wasn't as good as homemade baked/riced potato gnocchi, but was much, much better than the shelf stable gnocchi and fairly quick and easy to make.
 
As far as lasagna noodles,, you can't leave them in water. They will continue to absorb it and get soggy. What you can do is store them in a bag or whatever with a tiny amount of water. If there are any that stick, you can soak them in some warm water and they should unstick. I do this with leftover pasta if we cook too much.

But, I wouldn't do that if I was making the lasagna. If you need to make something ahead to save time, make the sauce and cheese mixture. Noodles don't take long to cook.

I have been using the no boil noodles, although I do soak them in some very warm water in a pie or cake pan, a few at the time, until they just start to soften. Just soak a few at the time though. I pretty much add another batch to the water as I take the last one out from the previous.
 
I've cooked all sorts of pasta ahead of time. Saw it being done at a food mall. After cooking (very al dente) then give them a good coating of either oil or butter. When ready to serve they just need to be immersed in boiling water for a minute or two.
Water can be kept simmering on the back burner while doing other things and a minute or two immersion is a lot faster than 8 minutes or more.
I often did this when there were multiple sittings at the dinner table for various work shifts and kids extra curricular activities. Everything prepped early in the day and then just assembled when needed.
 
Before I started making fresh sheets, I would just buy them and use them as is, just making sure they are covered in sauce, maybe a bit thinner than you normally use.

If I would want to use them soaked, I would do it on the spot and assemble straight away.
I don't see a time advantage in just soaking the sheets ahead if time.
Then rather make the whole thing ;)
 
When I make Lasagna, I often have some leftover noodles. I store them in a sealed container in the fridge. When I go to use them again ( usually just to snack on and dip in the left over sauce), I just fill a bowl with water, dunk them in, and they separate, usually with no issue.

As long as the package of Gnocchi is shelf stable, then there should be no issue storing it. I also used to keep a package on hand for those days I need to make something quickly.
 
My most memorable lasagna (I believe I mentioned once before) was a beautiful creation with all the various cheeses, which I could barely afford at the time, sauce, etc. Left it on the dinner table to rest and cool before cutting. Went to gather family and we all came in to find the German Shepherd standing on the table gulping down the last of it. I almost cried. Never did check her mouth to see if she had blisters.
 

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