What's your weather right now? 2024 Edition

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I've recently being seeing ads for solar energy. As much as I think the panels on ones roof are not the prettiest I believe it's going to be the way of the future. Storage or "banking" for rainy days (thru Winter) and even keeping the e-car supplied.
I also like the mason jar idea. At the moment my son has 8 jugs on a rack in the furnace room. We don't care for the city water and bring in bottled anyway. The caps are dated and we rotate them fairly often (usually when we're too lazy to go to the water depot :mrgreen:).

My house faces North, so I could cover the backside of my roof with solar panels. I actually picked my lot 23 years ago anticipating solar in my future. I just haven't found that all important "round tuit" yet.

As for storing emergency water in glass Mason jars, they just need to be clean, not sterilized. If they have been used before, just run them through the dishwasher, and use new lids.

Plastic jugs will add a plastic taste to water, over time. I know this because my dad learned it the hard way after Hurricane Ike.

CD
 
The latest from my on-the-spot reporter (sister) in Houston. CenterPoint is bringing an 18-wheeler size generator to my mom's senior living community as I type this, they are going to take the place off the grid until they can get the grid back in their area, which could be five days from now... or more. I guess al the Ambulance traffic to and from the center got them worried about a big lawsuit if someone's 90 year old mom were to die (like mine).

CD
 
When I saw the picture someone was sharing about saving water in canning jars, I got very antsy. There were tall metal shelves with a lot of jars. I grew up in earthquake territory. That just seemed like a great way to have a whole lot of wet, broken glass all over ones floor. Other than the risk of earthquake, it sounds like a great idea.
 
When I saw the picture someone was sharing about saving water in canning jars, I got very antsy. There were tall metal shelves with a lot of jars. I grew up in earthquake territory. That just seemed like a great way to have a whole lot of wet, broken glass all over ones floor. Other than the risk of earthquake, it sounds like a great idea.

We do have earthquakes in North Texas, but they are manmade by fracking, and they are really, really small.

CD
 
Montreal is in an Earthquake zone. I have felt them there, but don't think they would have knocked any jars down, unless of course the shelves were very iffy in the first place.
As to water in plastic - I questioned the staff at the water depot asking how long was the water in the jugs good for. Indefinitely, as long as stored out of the sun. Preferably in a dark, cool room.
Son had water jugs (5 gal.) for 2 years before use, they were fine. (it was accidental, was meant to be changed in 1 year)
 
Montreal is in an Earthquake zone. I have felt them there, but don't think they would have knocked any jars down, unless of course the shelves were very iffy in the first place.
As to water in plastic - I questioned the staff at the water depot asking how long was the water in the jugs good for. Indefinitely, as long as stored out of the sun. Preferably in a dark, cool room.
Son had water jugs (5 gal.) for 2 years before use, they were fine. (it was accidental, was meant to be changed in 1 year)

He probably had a better quality of plastic jugs. My dad had about ten gallons stored in one of the many bathrooms of their house, and they were the thin plastic used for milk jugs in the US (we don't have bagged milk here, at least down South).

CD
 
Well, n;ever tried to store water in those type of jugs. We had them too, some of the provinces still use them. Not sure just how many provinces use the "bags". But those milk jugs, perhaps because they were thinner plastic? Even though food grade? Maybe that was it.
 
Montreal is in an Earthquake zone. I have felt them there, but don't think they would have knocked any jars down, unless of course the shelves were very iffy in the first place.
As to water in plastic - I questioned the staff at the water depot asking how long was the water in the jugs good for. Indefinitely, as long as stored out of the sun. Preferably in a dark, cool room.
Son had water jugs (5 gal.) for 2 years before use, they were fine. (it was accidental, was meant to be changed in 1 year)
Well, yes, Montreal does get some tiny earthquakes. They don't usually rate as high as 4 on the Richter scale. I have certainly felt some of those tiny quakes, but nothing in my home ever fell off of anything or broke.

I was talking about growing up in Southern California. You know, like visiting your parents and being woken early because the building is shaking, AKA, the Northridge quake. BTW, the epicentre of that quake was about 5 miles from where I grew up.

That picture I saw of the jars stored on metal shelves, yeah, it looked like it would easily topple. It would have looked a lot safer, if the shelving had been secured to the wall with straps or some other type of anchors.
 
Yeah, I know that they've only been tiny. But there was one recently that frightened a lot of people. I was driving over to Alexandria and when I arrived people in the Hardware store were chattering away and several people actually looked very scared. I never felt a thing driving in the car - but the epicentre evidently wasn't that far away. No it wasn't a "big" one, but can you imagine the panic in Montreal should there ever be?
 
Well, yes, Montreal does get some tiny earthquakes. They don't usually rate as high as 4 on the Richter scale. I have certainly felt some of those tiny quakes, but nothing in my home ever fell off of anything or broke.

I was talking about growing up in Southern California. You know, like visiting your parents and being woken early because the building is shaking, AKA, the Northridge quake. BTW, the epicentre of that quake was about 5 miles from where I grew up.

That picture I saw of the jars stored on metal shelves, yeah, it looked like it would easily topple. It would have looked a lot safer, if the shelving had been secured to the wall with straps or some other type of anchors.

I have been through an F5 tornado and a Cat3 hurricane, but never an earthquake, even though I spent a lot of time in California for my work. I'd rather not experience a "big one," but there is a warped part of my brain that would like to check that box on my "life experiences" list. It is the same twisted part of my brain that wonders what a plane crash would be like. :shock:

CD
 
I have been through an F5 tornado and a Cat3 hurricane, but never an earthquake, even though I spent a lot of time in California for my work. I'd rather not experience a "big one," but there is a warped part of my brain that would like to check that box on my "life experiences" list. It is the same twisted part of my brain that wonders what a plane crash would be like. :shock:

CD
Oh dear, now you have me wondering what a hurricane or tornado would be like. And with climate warming, the chances of getting those here is going up.
 
Oh dear, now you have me wondering what a hurricane or tornado would be like. And with climate warming, the chances of getting those here is going up.

The EF5 tornado was scary. I was 13 years old at the time. Our house did not take a direct hit, but a block up the street, homes were gone.


The hurricane was not nearly as scary, but still rather unsettling. There was a measurable amount of anxiety, but not outright panic. I was house-sitting my parent's house in North Houston, while they were out of the country on vacation.


CD
 
F3 - May 27, 2024 passed over the 40 in Rigaud and Tres-St. Redemteur, Quebec. I could see the Church tower of Tre-St. Redemteur from my house, and I shopped often in Rigaud where my eldest son lives. Destroyed and damaged trees, damaged houses and garages.
 
F3 - May 27, 2024 passed over the 40 in Rigaud and Tres-St. Redemteur, Quebec. I could see the Church tower of Tre-St. Redemteur from my house, and I shopped often in Rigaud where my eldest son lives. Destroyed and damaged trees, damaged houses and garages.
As I wrote, hurricanes and tornadoes become more likely to happen here as the climate crisis continues. They get hurricanes in the Maritimes and Newfoundland. I expect they will get to Quebec. Heck, they may have hit the Gaspé already.
 
taxy, that wasn't a random storm. I just chose that one as it was close to you. There actually was one in Pierrefonds, not sever but bad enough. I'd have to find the site again. It gives the dates and the severity. Although the scale changes, so a bit confusing.
list of tornado by province
....*Of the average 60 confirmed tornadoes each year, Alberta and Saskatchewan both average between 14 and 18 tornadoes per season, followed by Manitoba and Ontario with normally between 8 and 14 tornadoes per season. Quebec is another recognized tornado-prone zone averaging between 4 and 8 tornadoes each year. Atlantic Canada and Interior British Columbia are also recognized tornado zones averaging between 0 and 4 tornadoes each year. *....

You have to scroll down to Quebec to see what's going on. LOL
and what's that song? "This Ain't Texas"

Texas
Texas leads the nation for the average number each year only because of its size. Surprisingly, when looking at how many tornadoes occur per fixed area then Florida leads followed by Kansas, and again surprisingly, Maryland.
 

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