Why no yeast aroma or flavor in bread?

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oldcoot

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When I was a kid, Mom would send me to the bakery for a loaf of bread. Because of its delightfully enticing aroma, I always ate several slices on the way home - much to Mom's chagrin. (Hey, it was expensive: 10 cents a loaf!)

Here's my latest loaf: apprearance and texture are pretty good, but I cannot seem to get that yeasty aroma. Howcome?


LOAF2-0.JPG
 

kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
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Feb 21, 2002
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Being the "expert" at bread baking :P :roll: that I am I don't have a clue old coot!!! I have made homemade breads though that don't have a very strong yeast taste or smell. I'm not sure what the difference is in those that do have a strong taste and smell is. You're our resident bread baker and you're not supposed to stump us like this!!! LOL We're supposed to ask YOU the bread questions! :mrgreen:

Do you by chance have a cold which is making your taster and smeller malfunction?
 

maws

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Oldcoot - With breads like those you show us, who cares about aroma? Well, perhaps it would be an added bonus. Have you tried making a starter which sits for some time? I find that these give a definite yeasty smell to my loaves. You don't necessarily need to prepare sourdough - I simply mix water, yeast and flour and allow it to sit for anything from 30 mins. to a couple of hours. But I'm not sure whether this slightly sour aroma is what you are looking for. When you find it, please let us know.
Maws.
 

oldcoot

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:eek:tta help you guys - gals - are!

I just posed the question to a major yeast manufacturur - stay tuned. (Hope I get an answer!)

And, no, "Elf - I don't have a cold or anything! My sniffer is in reasonably good working order.

Maws, I woudl kill for a load of that spllit top sesame bread I used to buy for my Mom. It was sooo goood!

The loaves I make are too heavy and don't have anything approaching that wonderful flavor. But I am stubborn and determined - sooner or later........
 

maws

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Elf - I haven't made one for so long, just cannot remember. Is that the recipe with selfraising flour and beer? Sounds good for the bbq this weekend. Thanx.
Maws.
 

maws

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Oldcoot - Looking at your loaves it is clear that stubbornness and determination wins! You'll find exactly what you want. Good luck.
Maws.
 

ChrisF

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Oldcoot, I know what you are talking about, but don't know the answer.
Funny I do remember smelling that aroma just last week but can't remember if it was the bread I baked, or a loaf I picked up at the store. :roll:

This getting old is for the birds. Oh well, I guess I need to make that bread recipe again this weekend just to be sure. ;)
 

BubbaGourmet

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old coot;
As I have stated before, the Lady Christine is the baker here. One thing she is adamnant about is the freshness of the yeast. I hate to pose such an obvious idea but have you checked the date on the yeast?
 

ChrisF

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I just thought of something, do you use Dry or cake yeast. Cake yeast may have more of the aroma but you need to get it fresher, like BubbaG mentioned, check the date.
I use dry yeast in the jar, just because it is always available when I get the urge to bake.
 

oldcoot

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I, too, have used only dry yeast, and it has crossed my mind that fresh yeasst might make a difference. BW looked for it in the market yesterday, but found none.

The dry yeast I'm using is well within its printed use date.

I'll make a more cncerted effort to find the fresh yeast! Thnks, fellas.
 

oldcoot

Senior Cook
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I DID IT!

When all else fails, read the directions! Amazing how well that works!

Of course, the directions came from a number of different sources, but the result ws wonderful! Take a look:

LOAF-SAFYEAST1.JPG


Whadi do?

1st, made sure my yeast water was between 110-120 F, then added yeast & sugar and let it stand for about 15 minutes, until nice and foamy. I used that toaster oven to hold the temp, but wrapping it in a towel or inverting a bowl over it would probably hold the temp as well.

Then added the yeast-water to a samll amount of flour (1 cup to 1 cup) and mixed with whisk on moderate speed for about 5 minutes., the added flour and other ingredients until a very soft, rather sticky dough formed, and let the KA dough hook knead it for about ten minutes. Very smooth and elastic.

Next, instead of the old rise untile doubled routine, I used the method recommended by SAF Yeast: poke your finger up to the second knuckle into the dough. When the hole stays there, the yeast is "ripe" (to use their term).

Turned it onto very lightly floured board and patted and stretched it into a 7 " wide rectangle, then rolled it into a cylindeer and put it in the oiled loaf pan. When it had risen (ripened or proofed) until a finger dent remained, I baked it in a preheated 375 oven for 30 minutes.

Softest, lightest, tenderest loaf ever. I still can't appreciate much of a yeast smell or flavor, but BW and a neighbor insist its there. Soooo.....
 

ChrisF

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Oldcoot, Congrats on an other great looking loaf! :D

I started looking in my bread books regarding yeast, the only thing I could find was that everything should be warm even the eggs, flour ect. They even said to warm the bowl. Something to do with how yeast is produced now to give it a longer shelf life. There are not many home bakers around to us it up fast!

I'd like to hear what you think if you do find the cake yeast and give that a try. :?:
 

carnivore

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Feb 22, 2003
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that is the best looking loaf yet oldcoot! i'll give that method a try next time. i made a french loaf last night that was my best yet, but not near as pretty as yours. i definitely appreciate all your tips.
 

oldcoot

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Thanks, guys. Yes, it was good warm with a good slather of real butter! :)

I tried getting cake yeast today at the market. They do handle it, but were out temporarily. So I'll definitely give it a try soon.
 

Atomic Jed

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Well done Old coot!!! I have heard that some of the most "famous" bread and pizza doughs are a result of a "mother" yeast. Which is many, many years old. Somehow they take a piece of it, while the rest regenerates, thus imparting a unique flavor and aroma. Ala balsamic vinegar. where the barrels age give it's special flavor, and is so coveted, that when it is so saturated that it can no longer contain liquid, they put it inside another barrel to preserve it's age old flavor! Atomic Jed!
 

maws

Cook
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AJ - Last year I kept a mother yeast, which had never seen a grain or spot of commercial yeast, only flour and water, going for more than 6 months. It was really well worth the effort. I am starting one again. The previous one was given to a friend when I went on holiday and she allowed it to collapse. It is normally a wonderful gift for bread-baking-friends - and if you have to abandon it for a while, you just pick up some from a friend who received it from you! Sounds complicated? But isn't at all. It becomes a circle of friendship - and the flavor increases all the time.

Oldcoot - your loaf fills me with envy!! Congrats, you really do us proud!!!
Maws
 

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