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Old 04-29-2020, 08:24 AM   #1
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ISO help/advice with homemade yeast

I made home made yeast, it seemed to be working fine (got bubbly and was rising), I put it in the fridge for 2 days, when I took it out to use it, I added the ingredients I must add once a week and "bam" the bubbles stopped and it stopped rising, does this mean it's no good? does it have a short life span? Can it go bad? Should I wait a few days or start over?

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Old 04-29-2020, 10:14 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanpie View Post
I made home made yeast, it seemed to be working fine (got bubbly and was rising), I put it in the fridge for 2 days, when I took it out to use it, I added the ingredients I must add once a week and "bam" the bubbles stopped and it stopped rising, does this mean it's no good? does it have a short life span? Can it go bad? Should I wait a few days or start over?
Let me say first. I also have been working on a starter now for over a month and have yet to bake one loaf of bread or use it for anything.
Yesterday I turned on the oven and forgot that my starter was in there.
So I ruined it and will now have to start over again.

If indeed your starter was ready to use, it will become active again. A friend gave me some before I started trying on my own.
I used the spoon I stirred it with to start my own.
It worked and that gift is still in the fridge and looks dead until I allow it to warm up and feed it.
It is what I am relying on for now until I get my own started and I learn how to keep it.

Take your starter out and let it warm up and discard 1/2 of it. Replace it with equal amounts of water and flour. (actually I use a little less water) and leave it out of the fridge in a warm place.
The oven works well with just the light on. But it can get to hot. And you could accidentally turn it on. That would be the end of it.

Good luck and just keep trying. I am not going to make a new starter until I can find some rye or whole wheat flour.
Also, now I can find yeast easily. The whole purpose of making a sourdough starter to begin with.
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Old 04-29-2020, 11:12 AM   #3
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Thanks for the info.

I think I'm going to redo it from scratch, as it's been on my counter for 2 days and does not seem to want to activate.

The recipe I used is the following:
2tbsp water or pinapple juice (I used the juice)
3tbsp whole wheat flour

Mix often
every 24 hours add
2tbsp water and 3 tbsp wheat flour - stir

Keep doing this for 3 to 5 days.

do not close lid tightly on the jar.
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Old 04-29-2020, 11:40 AM   #4
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Sourdough starter relies on wild yeast spores that are floating in the air. This yeast needs to come in contact with the hydrated flor. As it feeds off of the simple starches, it gives off CO2 and acid. Though wild yeast can live in a stronger acidic environment than can store bought varieties, it will still onlly handle so much acid before it dies. Try using water, with a little sugar. And don't put a lid on the jar. Instead, cover with cheesecloth secured to the jar with string, or a rubber band. Also, if you live in a warmer place than me, leave the jar near an open window. There are more yeast spores floating around outside than there are in your home. The cheesecloth will keep unwanted critters out of the starter. One it's bubbling nicely, you will need to store your starter in the fridge to stop the yeast from feeding, and producing too much acid in the syarter.

Hope this helps.

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Old 04-29-2020, 02:39 PM   #5
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I think it's likely that the acidity of the pineapple juice killed the yeast at the beginning.

This is a great YouTube channel to follow for bread-making of all types. This particular video is all about sourdough. Hope it helps.
https://youtu.be/vmb0wWKITBQ
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Old 04-29-2020, 05:30 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I think it's likely that the acidity of the pineapple juice killed the yeast at the beginning.

This is a great YouTube channel to follow for bread-making of all types. This particular video is all about sourdough. Hope it helps.
https://youtu.be/vmb0wWKITBQ
Ever since you first mentioned him or linked to one of his videos, I have been following him. I really enjoy his videos.
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Old 05-09-2020, 11:02 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wanpie View Post
Thanks for the info.
I think I'm going to redo it from scratch, as it's been on my counter for 2 days and does not seem to want to activate.

The recipe I used is the following:
2tbsp water or pinapple juice (I used the juice)
3tbsp whole wheat flour

Mix often
every 24 hours add
2tbsp water and 3 tbsp wheat flour - stir

Keep doing this for 3 to 5 days.

do not close lid tightly on the jar.
Okay. I see you used a method I saw online as well. At first I was following KA's method and was wasting flour by the cup each day.
I have come to a new revelation and I am not wasting nearly as much and I have a starter that is so active, it will more than double its size in 6 hours or less.
Here's how I would start a new one:

In a quart size glass jar mix 1/2 cup whole wheat*, sprouted wheat* or rye flour* with a 1/4 cup water. Mix well, cover with wax paper. Use a rubber band to hold it and poke one hole in it. I use a tooth pick.
Place in a warm place (the warmest spot in my kitchen without cooking is about 70f). Let stand until the next day at the same time.

From this second day on, you will feed 3 tbls flour and 2 tbls warm or tepid water and stir well. Cover with wax paper you made the small hole in.
Do not discard any contents.

Watch your jar and feed it every day like I said above and do not discard any contents. I use another rubber band to mark the level each day to see how much it rises.

I get action by the 3rd day. If you do not, continue with 3 tbls flour and 2 tbls water each day. Make sure it stays somewhat warm.

You should by now (4th day) have bubbles and the sponge should double each 24 hours or less.

At this time discard 1/2 the starter, and replace with 1/2 cup flour and 1/4th cup water. Sponge should be very thick, but you should be able to stir it.
Let this set and allow it to double.

You now can punch it down, cover and put in the fridge or continue to feed each day. I am still working on my storage options. But a weekly feeding at room temperature and subsequent doubling, the starter should last indefinitely.

You will find your own way. Watch differing videos and read different philosophy's and gather the knowledge of others that have been down our road and those that are experts.
You may very well use my suggestions, but find a way that may be easier for you. There is no single way to make a sourdough starter. But a starter that doubles its size in 8 hours is the goal. My goal.
There are proven methods for sure and those should be looked over to ensure success.

* Whole grain flours work way better than plain white flour. They work faster. I have tried both white AP unbleached and whole grain flour and the difference is big. Whole grain flours work better.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I think it's likely that the acidity of the pineapple juice killed the yeast at the beginning.

This is a great YouTube channel to follow for bread-making of all types. This particular video is all about sourdough. Hope it helps.
https://youtu.be/vmb0wWKITBQ
There is a guy on YouTube that uses unsweetened pineapple juice to feed his starter. His methods seems to work for him and gives his starter a distinct flavor and fragrance. He also says it works faster than water?
Its worth a try IMO.

Below is a 4 day old starter using my method above. It was 9 hours since feeding. The rubber band was where the starter was before I fed it.
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