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Old 11-16-2020, 12:03 PM   #1
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ISO any goulash recipes that might be exceptional

I remember eating goulash years ago and it was delicious. Haven't had it as good since.

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Old 11-16-2020, 12:16 PM   #2
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Point of clarification. Do you mean goulash as in the meat stew of Hungarian origin or the American dish made with macaroni and tomato?
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:10 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Point of clarification. Do you mean goulash as in the meat stew of Hungarian origin or the American dish made with macaroni and tomato?
Now that you mentioned both I guess I am interested in both. But I did mean the American version.
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Old 11-16-2020, 02:25 PM   #4
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Here's my version. This dish has several different names depending on geography. I know it as Amreican Chop Suey. It's also called goulash, slumgullion and Johnny Marzetti.

AMERICAN CHOP SUEY

1 Lb Ground Beef
1 Ea Onion
1 Ea Green Pepper
2 Cl Garlic
3 Tb Tomato Paste
28 Oz Canned Tomato
1 Lb Elbow Macaroni

Brown the beef in a sauté pan over medium high heat.

Add the onion, pepper and garlic and sauté until softened.

Add the paste and sauté for an additional 3 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add the tomato to the sautéed meat vegetables. Simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Prepare the pasta according to package directions.

When the pasta is cooked, drain off the water and mix the pasta with the vegetable and meat mixture. Cook together for 2-3 minutes to allow the flavor of the sauce to cook into the pasta.

Serve with grated cheese.
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Old 11-16-2020, 03:57 PM   #5
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It's been a long time since I made it, but many years ago, when I got some fantastic paprika, the best I had ever gotten, up to that time, at Paprika Weiss - an iconic store on NYs upper east side. I had fewer cookbooks back then, but I got some good recipes from the old NYT books, and the recipes reminded me of chili, with freshly ground chili powder. Looking through those recipes, I see that I tried a lot of them! All of them had a lot of onions, an herb used in many was marjoram, combined with a smaller amount of thyme, in one recipe. Most had some chopped green bell peppers - probably because reds were not as available, back then, but I'd use reds, when I could get them. One recipe had a small veal kidney, to 3 lbs beef, which my note in the margin said that "the kidney gives a delicious flavor, different from other goulash". I had forgotten that one, but the one I remembered was the recipe that had caraway seed in it, which seemed strange, at first, but not when you think about cumin in chili, the flavor is unique, and delicious. I found that the browning of the meat shouldn't be as dark as a basic beef bourguignon, FI, and this is probably why some weren't even browned.

So here is the other goulash - my tweaked recipe, that I wrote in my Blue Book:

Hungarian Goulash

3 lbs beef chuck, cut in 1 1/2" cubes
salt and freshly ground black pepper
4 tb vegetable oil
2 cups chopped onions
1 tb minced garlic
1 tb tomato paste
4 tb sweet paprika
cayenne to taste (option)
1 tb caraway seeds, lightly crushed in mortar
1 tb dried marjoram, lightly crushed in mortar
1 c beef broth
one 14½ oz can crushed tomatoes
2 large, or 3 medium red bell peppers, cut into
2" x 1/4" strips

A. Preheat oven to 300°. Heat 3 tb oil in a large Dutch oven, over med high. Salt meat, and add to pan in a loose layer, and lightly brown meat, stirring around several times. Remove to a plate as it browns, adding more, adding oil, if necessary, and when all is browned, add onion, reduce heat to medium, and only about 3-4 min. Add tomato paste and garlic, and cook, stirring, about a minute. Add paprika, caraway, and marjoram, and cook a few minutes, stirring constantly. Add tomatoes and broth, and stir and scrape fond from the pan. Return meat to the pan, stir to coat, and bring to a simmer. Add black pepper to taste (usually about 3/4 tsp for me) and cayenne, if using. Cover the pan, and place in oven. Cook 1 1/2 hrs.

B. Remove pot from oven and stir peppers in. Place back in oven, and cook another 45 minutes. Adjust the salt, and peppers, and serve.


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Old 11-16-2020, 04:22 PM   #6
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My grandmother used to make a great Hungarian Goulash back in the day when I ate meat. She would serve it over egg noodles with a half sour pickle on the side. I wasn't crazy about the meat itself, but the noodles absorbing thee sauce / gravy is what stands out in my mind. I would get yelled at for not eating the meat, cause ,my grandmother would go on about how she Schlept a few blocks to the kosher butcher to get the finest meat ( and tell us how much it cost ) and Dragged it back to the apartment and slaved over the stove all day to make It for me. Jewish guilt at its finest . Unfortunately ( not that I would make it , being a vegetarian now) but most of her recipes are lost.
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Old 11-16-2020, 09:50 PM   #7
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Andy's American goulash recipe is pretty standard. It's how my mother made it. My Dad made a richer version by adding Italian seasoning, chopped onion, chopped green peppers, and used rotini noodles, which carried the sauce better. It was basically a good ragu with rotini noodles.

My version is similar to my Dads, except that is use fresh garlic, oregano, basil, rosemary, margorum, and lots of ground beef. I also add sauteed mushrooms. I also like to use penne pasta, or capellini noodles. Top with grated parmesan, romano, or Asiago.

Sauce:
14 oz. can chopped tomato
6 oz. can tomato paste
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/4 tsp. dried rosemary
1/4 tsp. dried marjoram
1 lb. ground beef
1 freshly chopped onion
1 freshly chopped green pepper
4 cloves minced garlic
8 oz. cremini, or button mushrooms, slice and sauteed
1 tsp. black pepper
2 cups uncooked noodles of choice, cooked to al dente in slated, boiling water, the drained and combined with sauce
grated cheese for sprinkling on top of plated goulash

That's my favorite version, though I loved my Mother's version as I grew up.

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Old 11-16-2020, 10:31 PM   #8
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Johnny Marzetti has cheese melted in...American or cheddar...now I want some Marzetti.
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Old 11-16-2020, 10:52 PM   #9
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There are two styles of goulash; Hungarian and Austrian. Wolfgang Puck has recipes for both, but he is famous for his Austrian version, served with spaetzle.
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Old 11-17-2020, 07:23 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Here's my version. This dish has several different names depending on geography. I know it as Amreican Chop Suey. It's also called goulash, slumgullion and Johnny Marzetti.

AMERICAN CHOP SUEY

1 Lb Ground Beef
1 Ea Onion
1 Ea Green Pepper
2 Cl Garlic
3 Tb Tomato Paste
28 Oz Canned Tomato
1 Lb Elbow Macaroni

Brown the beef in a sauté pan over medium high heat.

Add the onion, pepper and garlic and sauté until softened.

Add the paste and sauté for an additional 3 minutes, stirring frequently.

Add the tomato to the sautéed meat vegetables. Simmer for 15-20 minutes.

Prepare the pasta according to package directions.

When the pasta is cooked, drain off the water and mix the pasta with the vegetable and meat mixture. Cook together for 2-3 minutes to allow the flavor of the sauce to cook into the pasta.

Serve with grated cheese.
I just made it earlier today and it was great.
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Old 11-17-2020, 08:18 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgevan View Post
I just made it earlier today and it was great.
Thank you. I'm glad you like it.
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Old 11-18-2020, 10:29 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by georgevan View Post
I just made it earlier today and it was great.
And that's why andy's recipe is the standard.

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