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Old 09-09-2021, 12:37 PM   #1
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Measuring gluten?

Is there a simple way to measure the amount of glutton contained in flour?

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Old 09-09-2021, 12:41 PM   #2
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LOL.... think you mean gluten?

For glutton, I just step on the scale and that's how much glutton I've got in me.
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Old 09-09-2021, 12:55 PM   #3
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Actually, flour does not contain gluten. Gluten is a byproduct of making dough. It is created from the proteins in the flour that you make dough with.

Every flour you buy should have the protein content on the package, 11.7%, 10.0% etc. Higher protein content results in higher gluten in the end product.

As to products other than flour, I'd bet you can find all kinds of lists online.
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Old 09-09-2021, 02:47 PM   #4
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Old 09-09-2021, 04:13 PM   #5
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Actually, flour does not contain gluten. Gluten is a byproduct of making dough. It is created from the proteins in the flour that you make dough with.

Every flour you buy should have the protein content on the package, 11.7%, 10.0% etc. Higher protein content results in higher gluten in the end product.

As to products other than flour, I'd bet you can find all kinds of lists online.
Know of a way to measure that protein? If for example you want to mix flours to get a maximum desired gluten?
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Old 09-09-2021, 04:26 PM   #6
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There are several types of flour which do not contain gluten. Buckwheat flour, almond flour, rice flour, oat flour, chickpea flour, for example.
Depends what you´re going to make, basically.
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Old 09-09-2021, 05:04 PM   #7
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Know of a way to measure that protein? If for example you want to mix flours to get a maximum desired gluten?
I don't believe a home cook can do that. As I mentioned before, read the product labels.


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Old 09-09-2021, 06:14 PM   #8
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Know of a way to measure that protein? If for example you want to mix flours to get a maximum desired gluten?
Out of curiosity, what do you want to accomplish?
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Old 09-09-2021, 06:53 PM   #9
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Know of a way to measure that protein? If for example you want to mix flours to get a maximum desired gluten?
Not unless you are a chemist, with the proper equipment. If you are using a specific recipe that calls for a specific protein flour, say a homemade pasta, you would use a 00 grade flour, maybe mixed with semolina, another high protein winter wheat flor. Bread flour has more protein than all purpose, which as more protein than cake flour. Mixing flours, as in multi-grain breads generally goes 2/3rds bead flour, to 1/3 other flours combined. There are also difference when using whole grain flour vs. highly processed flour. Whole grain flour has bran, and the endosperm, and wheat germ, and requires greater hydration than white flour.

Hope this helps.

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Old 09-09-2021, 07:15 PM   #10
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Know of a way to measure that protein? If for example you want to mix flours to get a maximum desired gluten?
If you are trying to increase the amount of gluten in your bread dough, add vital wheat gluten to your measured flour(s). I always use some white whole wheat flour in my breads, but it has a wee bit lower protein content than bread flour. 1/2 tablespoon vital wheat gluten per cup of whole wheat flour gives my bread loaf a better structure.

https://www.thekitchn.com/vital-whea...at-is-it-84612
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Old 09-10-2021, 05:31 AM   #11
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My brother always bought and used extra gluten when making bread. I personally never saw the purpose, nor could I tell the difference although he swore he could.
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Old 09-10-2021, 07:43 AM   #12
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more gluten, proper hydration, and a little diastatic malt will give you a firmer crust, and more airy crumb, with larger wholes, like a goo French bread. Less gluten gives as softer texture, and finer crumb. For that really crusty bread, you need to place a shallow pan of water unto the oven while baking the bread, to create a little steam.

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Old 09-13-2021, 06:33 PM   #13
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At the pizzeria I work at the dough has been retracting a lot lately. Personally think it isn't as good as it used to be. Our flour is just labeled as high gluten. Just wondering if another flour should be added to dilute it. A few people have told the owners that the gluten is too high for the dough to be relatively workable.
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Old 09-13-2021, 11:53 PM   #14
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At the pizzeria I work at the dough has been retracting a lot lately. Personally think it isn't as good as it used to be. Our flour is just labeled as high gluten. Just wondering if another flour should be added to dilute it. A few people have told the owners that the gluten is too high for the dough to be relatively workable.

The Canadian flour I use is very high in gluten. And yes, what you describe sounds like a high-gluten flour.
Since that's the kind of flour I typically use, I find that I have to add more water than the recipe calls for, and I let it rest longer before working it. Higher gluten flours are good for pizza because the gluten gives the dough enough structure to hold air bubbles in place. However, you can't treat it the way you'd treat a softer flour. Conditioners like diastatic malt etc. are food for the yeast and help colour the crust, that might help you but if you're looking at using a conditioner, I'd suggest lemon juice. For home quantities, maybe 2 tbsps for 10 cups of flour (I use metric, this is just a guess for imperial quantities, but it gives you an idea.)

Typically, though, for pizza, people often use a 00 flour which is somewhat lower in protein - though still a strong flour -- and finer in texture.

The Freshloaf website has lots of good technical info on pizza, flour and gluten, you might want to check them out.
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