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Old 09-07-2018, 02:22 AM   #41
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I can give you mince and tatties that is a rather typical Scottish dish.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:50 PM   #42
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I can give you mince and tatties that is a rather typical Scottish dish.
That's not what I asked?? Hmmm.

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Old 09-07-2018, 08:29 PM   #43
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That's not what I asked?? Hmmm.

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Re-ask your question, English is a second language for CakePoet and she may not have understood your request.
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Old 09-07-2018, 11:23 PM   #44
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Wow, how did this become an argument?

Make some curry and some pasta, and eat it. If you like it, make it again. If you don't like it, don't make it again. That's what cooking is all about, IMO. You make stuff. You eat it. You decide if you like it, or not. Nobody can make that decision for you.

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Old 09-08-2018, 03:16 AM   #45
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I thought the question was more along the lines of "is there a gotcha that I should consider before making pasta with a curry?" BTW, I can't think of a gotcha.
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Old 09-08-2018, 03:52 AM   #46
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I thought the question was more along the lines of "is there a gotcha that I should consider before making pasta with a curry?" BTW, I can't think of a gotcha.
Either can I. It is an experiment that will cost ten bucks, maybe. Just do it. If it doesn't work out, don't do it again -- and tell us about it.

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Old 09-08-2018, 05:14 AM   #47
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Kinda like I said earlier, if no one experimented and tried eating new things, we'd still be eating local roots and berries like our ancient ancestors. With the invention of trade and travel began the mixing of different ingredients, spices ....

I think he was curious about our opinion as if it would work. I personally think it would. Although Ive never done it with Indian curries, I have had other Asian curries over some sort of pasta and it was great. If someone disagrees with not trying something new or nothing a culinary purist , let them stick to eating roots and berries.

Heck, being a vegetarian/ vegan, Im about as close to eating roots and berries than anyone here , and I still mix and match other cuisines (roots and berries from other regions, of course )

And more importantly , if there is a chewing issue, and pasta works for him, who is anyone to argue that it should be served with rice, which apparently he has more difficulty with ).

Now if you want the best of both worlds, assuming chewing function-wise, you can handle it, try using orzo which is a pasta similar in shape to rice. That being said, you may have the same chewing issues with it as you do rice, if size and shape are the issue.
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Old 09-08-2018, 06:30 AM   #48
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Rascal, most recipe I use are Madhur Jaffery and that you can google.

Sad that you never went to Saffron Indian or Bengal Tandoori when you were in Inverness.
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Old 09-10-2018, 05:58 PM   #49
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I was thinking the same exact thing. I actually did a search ( the day this thread was started ) and found many Indian Fusion restaurants some here and some in New Delhi in which some type of curry is served with some type of noodle.

Not sure why some people are so afraid of mix and matching cuisines or trying something new.

If no one ever tried anything new or anything out of their region cooking and eating would be very boring.

Ever since trade has existed there has been some kind of mixing up cuisines, difference spices, ingredients ...
Here, here!
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:22 PM   #50
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Indian curries DONT go with noodles. They do however come with a naan. States people just don't get it I think. You need to visit the uk to see how popular it is. You're be strung up if you served it with noodles.

Just saaaaying

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Actually there is nothing in the Sub-continent that is actually called "curry". It's a catch-all name for any spicy foods and what is churned out in Indian/ Pakistani/Bangladeshi/etc., restaurants is what the proprietors think the British (and probably the Americans) want the food to be like. The word "curry", which just comes from "kari", the Tamil general word for "sauce", was wished on the food of the Sub-continent by the Brits of the colonial era, very few of whom bothered to learn the local languages, customs or recipes of their "subjects".

(One of my student flat-mates came from Darjeeling and had a British father, from a family which had been domiciled in India for 4 or 5 generations, and an Indian mother.)
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:34 PM   #51
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Wow, how did this become an argument?

Make some curry and some pasta, and eat it. If you like it, make it again. If you don't like it, don't make it again. That's what cooking is all about, IMO. You make stuff. You eat it. You decide if you like it, or not. Nobody can make that decision for you.

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Bravo!Three rousing cheers for common sense!
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:37 PM   #52
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The staid British idea of curry is no longer an absolute truth.

Enough time has passed, and enough "Americanization" has occurred that Indian nationals, co-workers of mine, say that curry is a commonly used culinary term in Southern Asia.
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Old 09-11-2018, 12:33 AM   #53
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True but the curries the person used to start with was one Glaswegian curry and one Indian, the person never said Thai or Japanese and so I based my statement on what said person used as an example .

Had said person said I need a Thai noodle curry recipe I would gladly have given the person a Khao Soi recipe.
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Old 09-16-2018, 02:53 PM   #54
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So to the folks whinging on about how pasta is SO non-Indian, pasta IS, in fact, regularly used in Indian cooking. They call it "vermicelli" or "semiya". It most often pops up in desert recipes, but is used in savory cooking as well.

https://snapguide.com/guides/cook-in...le-vermicelli/
https://food.ndtv.com/recipe-vermicelli-upma-855092
https://food52.com/recipes/27330-sou...les-vermicelli
🍛 Spicy Indian Noodles recipe | How to make Spicy Indian Noodles
https://www.carveyourcraving.com/per...-indo-chinese/
https://recipes.timesofindia.com/rec...rs53523261.cms

Arguments about "authenticity" are usually stupid. Sure, sometimes something is SO FAR OFF for the cuisine in question that you might as well not try to make the connection at all. But I've had know-it-all-white-guys rag on me for supposedly "inauthentic" Indian recipes THAT WERE TAUGHT TO ME BY MY SOUTH INDIAN MOTHER IN LAW WHO WAS BORN IN 1911 and never went more than 5 miles from home in her life. The woman didn't even speak English. She taught me by DEMONSTRATION and sign language. Yet I had one of these jerks tell me she had obviously been "polluted" by contact with Westerners - and I was the first non-Indian she had ever met in her life, in 1983, when she was already 72 years old.

And while we're at it, referring to the UK as a source for authenticity in Indian cooking is ridiculous. I'm sure things have improved there over the years (as they have here) but the vast majority of "indian curry" over there has been of the Yellow Glop variety. Remember who invented "Major Grey's".

There are a LOT of "staples" in the Indian diet that ARE NOT "authentic" because they came from the New World and didn't make their way to India until the 18th or 19th centuries. Like potatoes, tomatoes, and that now-considered-wholly-"authentic"-and-ubiquitous fruit, HOT PEPPERS.

CUISINES EVOLVE. They do not stay the same. So contribute to the evolution in whatever way suits you.

So for this purpose, just toss the nonsense about "authenticity" out the window and give it a try. If you like it, do it again. It might help to chop the pasta so you don't have long strands.
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Old 09-16-2018, 06:32 PM   #55
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KB, got that off your chest,lol.

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Old 09-16-2018, 07:52 PM   #56
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Well said, KB.
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Old 09-16-2018, 08:52 PM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kitchen Barbarian View Post
So to the folks whinging on about how pasta is SO non-Indian, pasta IS, in fact, regularly used in Indian cooking. They call it "vermicelli" or "semiya". It most often pops up in desert recipes, but is used in savory cooking as well.

https://snapguide.com/guides/cook-in...le-vermicelli/
https://food.ndtv.com/recipe-vermicelli-upma-855092
https://food52.com/recipes/27330-sou...les-vermicelli
🍛 Spicy Indian Noodles recipe | How to make Spicy Indian Noodles
https://www.carveyourcraving.com/per...-indo-chinese/
https://recipes.timesofindia.com/rec...rs53523261.cms

Arguments about "authenticity" are usually stupid. Sure, sometimes something is SO FAR OFF for the cuisine in question that you might as well not try to make the connection at all. But I've had know-it-all-white-guys rag on me for supposedly "inauthentic" Indian recipes THAT WERE TAUGHT TO ME BY MY SOUTH INDIAN MOTHER IN LAW WHO WAS BORN IN 1911 and never went more than 5 miles from home in her life. The woman didn't even speak English. She taught me by DEMONSTRATION and sign language. Yet I had one of these jerks tell me she had obviously been "polluted" by contact with Westerners - and I was the first non-Indian she had ever met in her life, in 1983, when she was already 72 years old.

And while we're at it, referring to the UK as a source for authenticity in Indian cooking is ridiculous. I'm sure things have improved there over the years (as they have here) but the vast majority of "indian curry" over there has been of the Yellow Glop variety. Remember who invented "Major Grey's".

There are a LOT of "staples" in the Indian diet that ARE NOT "authentic" because they came from the New World and didn't make their way to India until the 18th or 19th centuries. Like potatoes, tomatoes, and that now-considered-wholly-"authentic"-and-ubiquitous fruit, HOT PEPPERS.

CUISINES EVOLVE. They do not stay the same. So contribute to the evolution in whatever way suits you.

So for this purpose, just toss the nonsense about "authenticity" out the window and give it a try. If you like it, do it again. It might help to chop the pasta so you don't have long strands.
Bravo, Kitchen Barbarian!
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:17 PM   #58
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]The staid British idea of curry is no longer an absolute truth.


Enough time has passed, and enough "Americanization" has occurred that Indian nationals, co-workers of mine, say that curry is a commonly used culinary term in Southern Asia.
Exactly! And it never was "an absolute truth.

"India" is a huge sub-continent and food varies as much as the people. As well as Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, all varieties of Christians and many other religions, to say nothing of long-established former British families who stayed after independence, there are centuries old Jewish communities (when Marco Polo visited India in the 12th century he found a long-established Jewish trading community and there is one Jewish community claims to be descended from merchants sent by the biblical King Solomon!).

Difficult to be too picky about "real" Indian cooking when you have such a wide culinary history as that.

(History teacher at it again!!)
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Old 09-16-2018, 09:24 PM   #59
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It's easier to categorize, or compartmentalize something in order to understand it.

But to be a part of something is to be fluid with it.

I guess that's why they call people stuck in their ideas "sticks in the mud".

Getting back to Southern Asian pasta, go for it, or become a muddy stick.
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Old 09-18-2018, 05:53 AM   #60
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So why do even have cooking forums when the answer is always do as you please?
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