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Old 08-22-2021, 04:39 PM   #1
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Unhappy Pickling question

This is the recipe I used,


1. 12 cups water
2. 1 cup Pickling Salt
3. 6 cup Pickling Vinegar
Bring Brine to a boil , use sterilized jars and rims , boil lids
4. make sure the lid and rim of jar is dry after filling ,, once full and tightened , flip upside down on towel let stand couple hours to ensure it is sealed ..
You can add pickling Spice and garlic too
Sounds Delish! Good Luck ! 😃

I used it for carrots, beans and pickling cukes. I put fresh dill and hot peppers in some jars.
Then reading up on methods I learned it wasn’t very safe. After 4 days I put them in the fridge even though they sealed. Are they still ok to consume? If so, how long will they last? Open or unopened?
I have since bought a canning pot and now will water bath them
This is my second attempt to post as I couldn’t find my original.

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Old 08-23-2021, 06:37 AM   #2
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In your first post you called this inversion canning. I have never heard of inversion canning. I have been canning; boiling water bath and pressure canning, for over 40 years and only use United States Department of Agriculture approved canning recipes and USDA approved websites. I can only conclude this is not a safe or approved canning method.

Personally I would not eat or share the foods you have put in your jars. Yesterday I boiling water bathed pickle relish. The USDA recipe called for the jars to be submerged in water heated to a roiling boil for 10 minutes. Because of the 7000 foot altitude I live, I needed to leave the jars in the rolling boil water for 20 minutes.

If I were you, I would start with fresh food, read the instructions for boiling water bath, and can foods with an approved recipe.
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Old 08-23-2021, 09:57 PM   #3
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Thank you

Hi,

Thank you for your advice! I’ve been water bathing my new batches and will do from now on!
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Old 08-24-2021, 03:00 PM   #4
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I don´t live in the US but I do know that the USDA is extremely cautious when recommending pickling/brining recipes.
I had a Conserves (pickles, jams, jellies, marmalades, hot sauces, etc) Company for 12 years and bottled ( I think you say "canned") everything in sight. Sometimes it was trial and error, but one thing is certain. If you´re pickling something, put the jar in boiling water for at least 25 minutes. This will seal the lid of the jar and create a vacuum; thus no mould can grow inside. The other very important factor is, make sure the vegetables/fruit you are pickling are completely covered in brine/vinegar before cooking.
Inverting the jar once the boiling liquid has been poured over the vegetables is an accepted way of preserving in many parts of Europe. Not particularly scientific, but most times, it works.
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Old 08-24-2021, 03:05 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
I don´t live in the US but I do know that the USDA is extremely cautious when recommending pickling/brining recipes.
I had a Conserves (pickles, jams, jellies, marmalades, hot sauces, etc) Company for 12 years and bottled ( I think you say "canned") everything in sight. Sometimes it was trial and error, but one thing is certain. If you´re pickling something, put the jar in boiling water for at least 25 minutes. This will seal the lid of the jar and create a vacuum; thus no mould can grow inside. The other very important factor is, make sure the vegetables/fruit you are pickling are completely covered in brine/vinegar before cooking.
Inverting the jar once the boiling liquid has been poured over the vegetables is an accepted way of preserving in many parts of Europe. Not particularly scientific, but most times, it works.
The rules about canning in the United States are a combination of USDA testing and manufacturers' recommendations. The formulation for the adhesive used on the lids has changed in recent years, so processing times of 10-15 minutes are most common.
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Old 08-24-2021, 03:08 PM   #6
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OK - good to know. The "Sanitary Seal" on the lids I used to use ( 6 years ago) may well have changed.
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