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-   -   Thanksgiving Dinner - Your Menu? (https://www.discusscooking.com/forums/f164/thanksgiving-dinner-your-menu-87806.html)

CarolPa 11-15-2013 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 1319402)
I've fried a few turkeys in my time. Done right, they are fantastic. You can't stuff it but you can do the stuffing in the oven. That's what I do every year for a roast turkey.

I'd recommend frying outdoors. There's a lot of steam and grease in the air. Cover the fryer and leave it on your deck or yard to cool. It takes a long time for that large quantity of oil to cool down so it can be handled safely. It can stay there overnight if you want.


I will probably do that one of these days, but I will also cook a traditional turkey in the oven. I know some in my family would like to have it deep fried. My son-in-law is Fire Chief, so I will wait until he arrives to drop the turkey down...he can be in charge of watching it. LOL My deck is not covered, so it will have to be on a day when there's no rain or snow.

GotGarlic 11-15-2013 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarolPa (Post 1319406)

I will probably do that one of these days, but I will also cook a traditional turkey in the oven. I know some in my family would like to have it deep fried. My son-in-law is Fire Chief, so I will wait until he arrives to drop the turkey down...he can be in charge of watching it. LOL My deck is not covered, so it will have to be on a day when there's no rain or snow.

A lot of people do a practice run, or two, with a chicken, to get used to the process.

Andy M. 11-15-2013 10:34 AM

The real WOW factor aside from the crispy skin and the moist breast meat is the fact that a 12-13 pound turkey cooks in about 45 minutes.

GotGarlic 11-15-2013 10:52 AM

Just found this old, old thread with great information on deep-frying a turkey: https://www.discusscooking.com/forums...keys-4800.html

Andy M. 11-15-2013 11:42 AM

That post may be old but the advice is still top notch.

msmofet 11-15-2013 03:19 PM

2013 Thanksgiving Menu

Appetizers/Soup
Stuffed Mushrooms
Pigs in blankets or Green olive poppers

Entrée
Roasted Turkey
Stuffing
Easy candied Yams
Broccoli, Cauliflower & Carrots
Brussels sprouts
Sautéed Mushrooms
Mashed potatoes
Turkey Gravy
Cranberry/Tangerine Relish
Cranberry sauce

Dessert
Apple pie
Pumpkin pie
Homemade Whipped cream

Beverages
Assorted soda
Sparkling cranberry apple cider
Coffee

CarolPa 11-15-2013 08:55 PM

For Sale: One electric turkey fryer. New, still in box. Cheap.

bakechef 11-15-2013 09:50 PM

A few years ago my sister and her husband brought their turkey and fryer and fried it here, it was good. I had to roast a turkey breast because I can't imagine Thanksgiving without the smell of turkey roasting in the oven. I also had drippings for gravy which you won't get with a fried turkey and there is no way that I'm eating gravy from a jar or packet on thanksgiving!

Andy M. 11-15-2013 10:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bakechef (Post 1319544)
A few years ago my sister and her husband brought their turkey and fryer and fried it here, it was good. I had to roast a turkey breast because I can't imagine Thanksgiving without the smell of turkey roasting in the oven. I also had drippings for gravy which you won't get with a fried turkey and there is no way that I'm eating gravy from a jar or packet on thanksgiving!


That's when you buy some turkey parts and roast them. Roasted parts make some stock and the drippings go into the gravy. Add a little roux and seasonings and you're done.

bakechef 11-15-2013 10:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 1319554)

That's when you buy some turkey parts and roast them. Roasted parts make some stock and the drippings go into the gravy. Add a little roux and seasonings and you're done.

I actually prefer a roasted turkey anyway, Alton Brown's brine makes the perfect turkey and it is much less cleanup than a turkey fryer!

Katie H 11-15-2013 10:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bakechef (Post 1319555)
I actually prefer a roasted turkey anyway, Alton Brown's brine makes the perfect turkey and it is much less cleanup than a turkey fryer!

+1.

I've been using Alton's brine method for years and couldn't be more pleased. Awesome turkey.

One thing I use to make the brining process easier is to brine the bird in a big orange drink cooler. You know the kind. Like the ones sports coaches are drenched with liquid at the end of a winning game.

Makes transport easy, keeps the contents cold for a long while and is easy to drain (from the spigot) before removing the turkey. I bought ours at a thrift store for next to nothing.

Andy M. 11-15-2013 10:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bakechef (Post 1319555)
I actually prefer a roasted turkey anyway, Alton Brown's brine makes the perfect turkey and it is much less cleanup than a turkey fryer!

I agree. I make the AB recipe every year. I was just offering a solution for gravy with a deep fried turkey.

bakechef 11-15-2013 11:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Katie H (Post 1319556)

+1.

I've been using Alton's brine method for years and couldn't be more pleased. Awesome turkey.

One thing I use to make the brining process easier is to brine the bird in a big orange drink cooler. You know the kind. Like the ones sports coaches are drenched with liquid at the end of a winning game.

Makes transport easy, keeps the contents cold for a long while and is easy to drain (from the spigot) before removing the turkey. I bought ours at a thrift store for next to nothing.

I've been buying brining bags the last couple of years and those work great. Luckily we have a mini fridge in the den so I can put it there and it isn't taking up space in the kitchen fridge. One year it was cool enough here that I could leave a bucket outside and it stayed cold enough, the ice didn't even completely melt.

Cheryl J 11-15-2013 11:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Andy M. (Post 1319554)
That's when you buy some turkey parts and roast them. Roasted parts make some stock and the drippings go into the gravy. Add a little roux and seasonings and you're done.

I do that every year even with oven roasted turkey. There is never enough gravy to keep up with the leftovers. :ermm: :smile: A week or so before Thanksgiving I buy a couple of wings or necks, roast them, make a stock and freeze it until the day before the meal. Make ahead gravy really helps stretch the pan drippings gravy for hot turkey sandwiches, leftover turkey casseroles and such. Heading to the store tomorrow to buy some parts and get that started. :smile:

Andy M. 11-15-2013 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cheryl J (Post 1319566)
I do that every year even with oven roasted turkey. There is never enough gravy to keep up with the leftovers. :ermm: :smile: A week or so before Thanksgiving I buy a couple of wings or necks, roast them, make a stock and freeze it until the day before the meal. Make ahead gravy really helps stretch the pan drippings gravy for hot turkey sandwiches, leftover turkey casseroles and such. Heading to the store tomorrow to buy some parts and get that started. :smile:

I bought a whole store brand turkey for that reason. Made stock and have three meals of turkey for sometime in the future. All for about $7.00 or $8.00.

Cheryl J 11-16-2013 12:07 AM

Great deal! I would so do that if I had the fridge space.

Janet H 11-16-2013 12:02 PM

I have a pile of people coming for dinner. This includes 5 vegetarians.

Peanut Soup
Turkey (2 of them)
Herbed dressing with giblets
Herbed dressing with nuts (vegetarian)
Gravy made from boiled and roasted turkey bits
Veggie gravy (stock from roasted veg)
Cranberry relish (cooked)
Cranberry relish (raw)
Mashed spuds
Baked Yams and w/sliced apples
Relish tray
Steamed Green Beans/ with toasted hazlenuts
Corn, cheddar and chile custard

Pumpkin Pie
Chocolate Pecan pie
Gingered Apple sorbet

Iced tea
WA state Malbac
Homemade Ginger-lime "beer" (no-alcohol)

Aunt Bea 11-16-2013 02:01 PM

How long can I safely hold a thawed turkey, in the original packaging, prior to cooking it?

I have seen from 1-5 days on various sites, any thoughts?

The answer I want is 3 or 4 days, with no trips to the emergency room! :ermm::ohmy::lol:

bakechef 11-16-2013 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aunt Bea (Post 1319639)
How long can I safely hold a thawed turkey, in the original packaging, prior to cooking it?

I have seen from 1-5 days on various sites, any thoughts?

The answer I want is 3 or 4 days, with no trips to the emergency room! :ermm::ohmy::lol:


I know that poultry in the grocery store has up to 2 weeks shelf life, so I imagine that a few days kept cold would be fine.

cmontg34 11-16-2013 09:37 PM

I'll actually have people over this year, so I'm planning on a feast.

Alton Brown's Brined Turkey w/gravy
Italian sausage and Parmesan dressing
Mashed potatoes
Brown sugar, roasted sweet potatoes
Bacon sautéed Brussels sprouts
Green Beans
Buttered corn
Homemade Parker House bread rolls

Pumpkin Pie and Pecan Pie for dessert


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