2 questions on Gumbo

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larry_stewart

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Although Im sure the answers will vary from person to person, region to region, experience to experience, and recipe to recipe, Im going to ask anyway.

So I was down south last week, and they served gumbo. Although Im a vegetarian and didnt eat it, I did kinda study it ( as Ive made myself vegetarian versions of gumbo in the past, and was curious about the smell, consistency and whatever else I could get by seeing it presented first hand).

What I noticed was that although thick, it looked more " soupy' than I thought it would. More liquid than other ingredients looking more like a thick soup with chunks of everything else in it.

Also, any recipe Ive followed had been tomato based ( sure they were vegetarian and had to avoid whatever the desired stock / protein should be), But I had assumed that all gumbos were tomato based. After studying this gumbo, it didnt appear tomato based at all. Not even sure there was any tomatoes in it at all.

So, back to the question, what is the desired consistency of gumbo (if there is any universal agreed upon consistency) ? and, is gumbo usually tomato based, or really depends on the recipe/ region ?

What Im looking for , i guess, is classic gumbo, not peoples interpretations on it or variations or fusion ideas.

thanks,
larry
 
Gumbo recipes can vary quite a bit. Traditional Louisiana Gumbo may or may not have tomatoes.

The thickening can come from a combination of roux, okra, or something called "gumbo filé" (pronounced "FEE-lay" ;)), which is ground sassafrass leaves. Depending on what's been used as a thickener or how long the roux has been cooked (longer cooking times don't provide as much thickening power), you may have a thinner or thicker consistency in the finished product.

Some traditional recipes for comparison:

Taste Lafayette Louisiana Seafood Gumbo | Lafayette Convention & Visitors Commission

Louisiana & New Orleans Gumbo | Recipes & Stories - NOLA.com
 
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Gumbo recipes can vary quite a bit. Traditional Louisiana Gumbo may or may not have tomatoes.

The thickening can come from a combination of roux, okra, or something called "gumbo filé" (pronounced "FEE-lay" ;)), which is ground sassafrass leaves. Depending on what's been used as a thickener or how long the roux has been cooked (longer cooking times don't provide as much thickening power), you may have a thinner or thicker consistency in the finished product.

Some traditional recipes for comparison:

Taste Lafayette Louisiana Seafood Gumbo | Lafayette Convention & Visitors Commission

Louisiana & New Orleans Gumbo | Recipes & Stories - NOLA.com


Exactly what I was going to say. You can have a great gumbo with veggie broth and the right seasonings.
 
Filé gumbo, gumbo filé. One's a dish the other is an ingredient.

If you add gumbo filé to any gumbo, does that make it a filé gumbo? Or is it a chicken and andouille gumbo with filé? Some recipes have you adding filé and cooking it in the gumbo, others have you adding it at the table as a condiment.
 
interesting. thanks, andy.

i'm a dumbo with gumbo except what i've learned from old cooking shows. you know, the ones with actual instructional cooking.

and i said dumbo for gumbo before the chief could.
 
interesting. thanks, andy.

i'm a dumbo with gumbo except what i've learned from old cooking shows. you know, the ones with actual instructional cooking.

and i said dumbo for gumbo before the chief could.

You my be a dumbo for gumbo but at least you're not screwy for andouille!
 
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