Broth, Stock, Bullion, Powder, Concentrate...so many choices!

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GinnyPNW

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Leaving aside other things one might use like wine, water, vinegar, etc...there are a lot of choices when it comes to Broth, Stock, Bullion (cubes & powders), Powder (other than bullion) and now, Concentrate (bottles & packets, the tubs seem to have disappeared). I've only recently been introduced to the "concentrate packets"...but must say they are convenient.

I'm wondering what others might offer for when to choose one of the above over another. I used to keep the little Knorr's tubs in the pantry, but I've not been able to find them in recent times. I found them easier to incorporate into whatever-pot-is-on-the-stove, than say, bullion cubes. So, just throwing this out there...thank you in advance for any and all input!

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I’m working my way through a jar of turkey Better than Bouillon that has a nice deep flavor. It’s comparable in price to canned stock and IMO more convenient.

I usually use GOYA powdered bouillon packets, particularly the ham and chicken flavors. They are a nutritional nightmare but they are inexpensive convenient and tasty.

Dried or fresh mushrooms, slowly browned onions, soy sauce, sesame oil, and Worcestershire sauce add a depth of flavor to many soups and gravies.
 
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I Just ran out of bouillon/stock powder. One batch lasted 3 years, so it is bigger than necessary.
To make it again I'll have to dehydrate cooked carrots and raw onions. I'll have to grind the crumbled dried parsley into a powder. It's salt free so salt can be added if you like. I keep it in glass jars in the cool basement.

Vegetable Bouillon/Stock/Broth Powder (w/o salt)
Mushrooms 20 oz (dehydrated ground mushrooms shiitake)
Onion 19.4 ounces (dried onion powder)
Carrots 14.21 ounces (dried carrot powder-use cooked dehydrated)
Celery 7.05 ounces (dried celery powder)
Garlic 20 t or 6 T + 2 t (dehydrated garlic) (approx 2.5 ounces)
6 T of parsley, dehydrated and ground
3 T thyme dehydrated ground
5 t of black pepper ground
2 and 1/4 t bay leaf, dehydrated ground

End weight 64-70 ounces, or 3.9 lbs for 60 recipes.
Each recipe amount would be 1.3 ounces of vegetable/herb dehydrated matter/ 1 quart of water.

To dehydrate from fresh: vegetables are mostly water, some more than others.
Carrots 15 lbs (fresh) 1 and 1/4 lbs (dry)
Celery 12 to 3/4 lbs
Onions 12 to 1 and 1/2 lbs
 
When I have time (as in mis en plac)e I usually use powder, cubes or paste. But at the stove and I suddenly want a bit more I reach for the bottle of thick concentrate in liquid form (usually Knorr or Bovril). It is so much faster, incorporating with just a bit of stirring. BTB paste would/is my nest choice under those circumstance but a lump of paste can escape disintegration in a large vessel.
 
I usually use BTB and add it to some veggie stock (made from veggie peels and scraps, the same way one makes a bone broth, but for a shorter length of time) and whisk it until it is fully dissolved. I have some vegan chicken broth powder that I often use to give it extra flavour. I haven't had great luck with store bought stock. The beef has that "canned flavour" and the chicken was too wimpy. I get a better result my way and it's a fair bit cheaper. I don't use Knorr or Bovril because I don't like their ingredient lists.
 
I usually use a vegan (chicken) powder.
I try to stick to the same one for recipe consistency.

Im not a big fan of vegetable flavored ones, as the taste varies depending on which veggies are used to make it and the amount of specific veggies.

I've tied BTB a few times. I dont mind it, just tastes different that the powder I use, which makes the dish taste different.

I dont like the cubes. I prefer the powder so I can add what I need and not have to keep opening and dropping in cubes until it tastes right.
 
When I have time (as in mis en plac)e I usually use powder, cubes or paste. But at the stove and I suddenly want a bit more I reach for the bottle of thick concentrate in liquid form (usually Knorr or Bovril). It is so much faster, incorporating with just a bit of stirring. BTB paste would/is my nest choice under those circumstance but a lump of paste can escape disintegration in a large vessel.
You can dip a cup of the broth out of the pot and whisk BTB paste into it, then return it to the pot.
 
Better than Bullion is my #1 choice. I normally keep one quart each of boxed chicken and beef broth for "just in case", but I'm running through all my food inventory so that I don't have much to give away/move. If I have the right jars on hand, I can make my own broth blend for a particular dish. For example, the Southern Living recipe we really enjoy for "Skillet Shrimp Destin" calls for 3 3/4 cups vegetable broth. Most veggie broths taste too "carroty" to me, so I mix half BtB veggie base with 1/2 lobster base. Perfect! *chef's kiss"
 
On the farm I almost always had my own chicken stock to hand, but I did keep cartons of beef and chicken for "just in case". Been caught a couple of times not realizing I had used up all the homemade.
But here freezer/fridge space is limited.
I have several of the BTB flavours now and quite like them. I also use powdered mushroom and leek (homemade) I use to boost flavour - when I remember. Those I especially like the subtle flavour in egg dishes.
 
On the farm I almost always had my own chicken stock to hand, but I did keep cartons of beef and chicken for "just in case". Been caught a couple of times not realizing I had used up all the homemade.
But here freezer/fridge space is limited.
I have several of the BTB flavours now and quite like them. I also use powdered mushroom and leek (homemade) I use to boost flavour - when I remember. Those I especially like the subtle flavour in egg dishes.
No problem and I understand most people don't make their own and also appreciate my SO if she makes food where she's used these, and generally they're fine and most of the time if I'm actually there my SO will ask me to "doctor" them up, so to speak.

Most restaurants also bring in batch made sauce for labor and food cost cutting measures, which generally doesn't pass the taste test but nevertheless that is somehow becoming the norm and i understand that and don't dis a restaurant that does this except if it's a high end restaurant that promises an exceptional experience and where the wine list and food prices for everything is well lets say, not cheap, then they had better gone the extra mile in every respect of food preparation and presentation and that includes made from scratch sauces., otherwise I will be talking with the management to let them know I know they did a boo boo and probably won't be back. Yes, seriously I will do that, lol. Pretentious fools shouldn't be aloud to get away trying to fool everyone, lol. RANT OVER.

My training is to blame. I specialized is sauce making for mostly high end small establishments (under 90 seats) and held the position of saucier very early in my career and now I can't do it any other way. I must say it is a pain in the butt sometimes.

At the restaurant, I make beef, chicken, duck and rabbit stocks and freeze them. I'll make a demi using the beef stock for example and utilize that as part of a sauce for a beef dish and for the peasant ballotine that I put on the menu recently I just make a pan sauce to order and use either chicken or rabbit stock. I have a halibut entree that I can't seem to take off the menu and that sauce is a curry which I'll generally make 4 liters at a time. I make bulk bulgogi sauce, 2 liters at a time for a vegetarian mushroom dish, so it's still full speed ahead as far as my life is concerned making stock this way and at 70 yrs old I'm not going to change. :)
 
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I have to admit to hardly ever using any form of stock.

My dad used knorr cubes occassionally, and obviously reducing salt.

I have used soup (those packs with powdered soup) instead of stock but the last time was more than 5 years ago.

My dogs (Jack Rascal's) eat all left over bones. Nothing left to make stock off ;)
 
I guess I'm in the minority who make their own stocks. Mostly chicken. My SO does use a variety of premade powdered and some liquid concentrates.
I make my own chicken and turkey stocks too. I keep them for soups and stews. The BTB is handy for small jobs when you want to boost the flavor of a dish or extend a quart of stock to a quart and a half.
 
<<My training is to blame. I specialized is sauce making for mostly high end small establishments (under 90 seats) and held the position of saucier very early in my career and now I can't do it any other way. I must say it is a pain in the butt sometimes.>>
While I'm far from a Pro, I totally appreciate what you are saying. But, I totally get what a PITA it can be to be spoiled, so to speak, by the good stuff! I make my own salad dressings and must say, there are not many places where I can order and enjoy a salad. The bottled stuff just doesn't cut it anymore. When we moved to the PNW, having lived in L.A., CA all my life, there was a bit of culture shock with the quality of the restaurants. So, I've learned to make most of my favorite things, myownself.
smileys-yes-and-no-068329.gif
 
While I'm far from a Pro, I totally appreciate what you are saying. But, I totally get what a PITA it can be to be spoiled, so to speak, by the good stuff! I make my own salad dressings and must say, there are not many places where I can order and enjoy a salad. The bottled stuff just doesn't cut it anymore. When we moved to the PNW, having lived in L.A., CA all my life, there was a bit of culture shock with the quality of the restaurants. So, I've learned to make most of my favorite things, myownself.
smileys-yes-and-no-068329.gif
Exactly and good for you. I'm pretty much the same with most marinades, salad dressings, brines, vinegars, pickles, kimchi, hot sauces, mayo's, mustard, still buy heinz ketchup though. lol.
 
Leaving aside other things one might use like wine, water, vinegar, etc...there are a lot of choices when it comes to Broth, Stock, Bullion (cubes & powders), Powder (other than bullion) and now, Concentrate (bottles & packets, the tubs seem to have disappeared). I've only recently been introduced to the "concentrate packets"...but must say they are convenient.

I'm wondering what others might offer for when to choose one of the above over another. I used to keep the little Knorr's tubs in the pantry, but I've not been able to find them in recent times. I found them easier to incorporate into whatever-pot-is-on-the-stove, than say, bullion cubes. So, just throwing this out there...thank you in advance for any and all input!

smileys-cooking-658147.gif
BTB all varieties but especially the beef base. Knorr Selects powder.
Goya and Iberia packets when I cook Puerto Rican food.

I also make homemade chicken broth. Having experimented with quite a few recipes and methods I settled on ATK's pressure cooker recipe with small modifications. IMHO good flavorful chicken broth rich in gelatin is essential for dishes like paella and other chicken casseroles, and especially sautes finished with a pan sauce. I keep it in the freezer in 3-cup and 2-cup size containers.
 

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