Commercial ovens.

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CharlieD

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Do we have any professionals here? I am trying to get an opinion on commercial ovens. Need somebody who actually is working with that type of equipment.
 
Are you looking into a wall oven, or a freestanding type, and an electric or gas? I have a commercial range, but the ovens are just part of that, and it's just turned 40 years old (and I know it will outlive me!), so I can't tell you what a current day range/oven would be like. Some of our chef members can help you there. But I can tell you that they are built for more or less constant use - the reason that range looks like I haven't used it much, despite the amount I cook! Even someone cooking as much as I do, is nothing, compared to commercial use.
 
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Something like this. Electric, 220. Not sure what size this is, but I want a big one. Do not know if it should be or should not be convection type. Price of course is a big factor.

P.S. Yes, it is for synagogue. It is used mostly one day a week, Friday. On occasion of Holiday, it might be two days prep.
 
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Nice, looked at their website. How many people are generally fed at that time?

That double decker looks ideal for preparing food to be ready all at the same time. The amount of trays/shelves also suggests to me that you would be best off with the convection.

I am not a professional, nor have I ever worked in a restaurant kitchen. I've also only looked at the Vulcan that you pictured. In that respect I cannot really help you. But I'm also thinking that you should buy the very best that you can afford. I say that as with use once a week you probably should have less, if even any, problems with it. JMHO
 
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Something like this. Electric, 220. Not sure what size this is, but I want a big one. Do not know if it should be or should not be convection type. Price of course is a big factor.

P.S. Yes, it is for synagogue. It is used mostly one day a week, Friday. On occasion of Holiday, it might be two days prep.
I worked on those vulcans for 3 years, my previous experience was the gas fired blodgetts, the elec come up to temp very quickly compared to gas.
We always removed 1 rack, you still have 4 and the circulation is much better.
Slide an empty tray under the bottom rack to catch spills.

I would like to see 2 speed fan, baking muffins on full blast makes them lopsided.
I'd also check with the used equipment dealers and auctions, the mkt is flooded with good used equipment due to many closures in the past couple of yrs.
I picked up double blodgett gas convections for $1800 at auction.
 
Yeah, they are hard to beat and I've never seen one that wasn't convection. You will probably need a dedicated phase 3 connection (240v) with a dedicated fuse at the box. Electric is generally the better heat source and in Ontario Canada any appliance that was gas fired needed an approved exhaust hood which can be in the 10's of thousands, where electric doesn't.
 
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Yeah, they are hard to beat and I've never seen one that wasn't convection. You will probably need a dedicated phase 3 connection (240v) with a dedicated fuse at the box.
they make single phase, its cheaper to run 3 ph but for occasional use single ph is fine.
3 ph has its own box.
 
Unrelated ...

Where in Minnesota do you live, Charlie? Im sure you told me long ago but i forgot.

Up in The Range?

Ive been in Minneapolis a lot lately. Like tomorrow.
 
they make single phase, its cheaper to run 3 ph but for occasional use single ph is fine.
3 ph has its own box.
Yeah, the single phase I've seen with these units has been sketchy and problematic, or at least the 2 I've been involved with and has to do with how the energy is delivered and having a fuse large enough to handle these surges and any other surge that happen to be on the same circuit. 3 phase will be more efficient and last a lot longer but like you say costs more initially.
 
What will a commercial oven do for you that a much cheaper basic kitchen range can’t? 🤔
bake like you can't imagine. 100 croiss every 18 minutes. 300 eclairs/hr.

We bought a kitchenaid gas convection stove, the convection is a joke.
Whilst the 5 burner stove with heavy iron grates is very nice we do all the baking in a smaller counter top elec convection I got for $20 at a yard sale.

home convections are whisper quiet you can't hardly hear them, vs commercial convections ...you can't hardly hear yourself think. open the doors and they'll part your hair and give you a steam burn if not careful.

The kitchenaid fan motor is inside the oven, I don't see the lifetime being very long.
Commercials have the fan motor on the outside, they stick out at least 6 inches or more , they're heavy and built to last for decades, cost about $900 to replace.

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Unrelated ...

Where in Minnesota do you live, Charlie? Im sure you told me long ago but i forgot.

Up in The Range?

Ive been in Minneapolis a lot lately. Like tomorrow.
Let’s meet tomorrow. I’m in twin cities area
 
I think you are right to look for a commercial kitchen oven.
Rotating and timing on a home oven for even just 20 people gets old very fast and tiresome, especially on a weekly basis.
 
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