Harry & Laila's lamb tagine

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Harry Cobean

Executive Chef
Joined
Apr 29, 2012
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i posted this a while ago in a today's menu thread & also food photo's.it was first cooked for me by laila who i met whilst on holiday in morocco a few years ago.she told me it is very common in north african & many other cuisines worldwide NOT to seal meat before cooking.the idea is that the long slow cooking allows the juices/flavour of the meat to mingle with the other ingredients & vice versa, whilst the tagine prevents drying out.she is moroccan & a superb cook so i didn't argue!!healthy too...no oil or fats used.
THE INGREDIENTS FOR TWO
a)1lb(400-450grms)lean leg/shoulder of lamb
b)1 large onion
c)garlic to taste...i used half a head as per photo...looks pretty too!
d)large mild/medium chilli left whole...not a hot dish & the whole chilli adds flavour,but it's up to you...you know how hot you like it
e)1 large red bell pepper
f)aubergine...i used whole baby obbo's....large/cubed will do...you choose
g)2 cinnamon sticks
h)2tsps paprika
i)1tbls clear honey
j)juice of a lemon
k)3ozs(75grms)whole blanched almonds
l)16oz(400grms)can of cooked chickpeas
m)2inch(5cm)piece of fresh ginger root
n)1pint(0.5ltr)stock...i like chicken...your choice
o)salt & ground black pepper...i use sea salt & costco coarse ground malabar...the malabar has a kick which compliments the mild chilli heat
THE METHOD
1)cube the meat,chop the onion,crush the garlic(if not using half head).core & slice bell pepper,cube the aubergine(if not using baby)& rub with a little lemon juice to stop discolouring(or leave cubing til ready to add to dish),peel/grate ginger,drain chickpeas.
2)put all of the ingredients,apart from the chick peas,aubergines,almonds,salt & pepper,in the tagine base(or casserole/pan with a tight fitting lid),pour in stock,put on lid,bring to the boil then turn down heat to VERY GENTLE simmer.
3)simmer gently for 1.5/2.0 hrs.only take lid off to stir occasionally...the flavours in the steam!!
4)15-20mins before end of cooking time add aubergines,chick peas & almonds...put lid back on or leave lid off if too much liquid left..you decide
5)taste & season with salt & pepper
6)ENJOY!
 

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I wish I could get lean lamb here. I made a lamb shoulder on sunday half of that should have been thrown away, it was all fat. Thogh I have to say fat does give a great flavoe when cooking, so I threw it away afterwards.
 
wow Harry, you got me here. I am crazy about lamb, and I can not resist eggplants in any form (sweet, cooked, baked, grilled, cooked).
And it just happens that I have a kilogram of lamb in the freezer.

Thank you :)

If you have time you could try and cook the lamb in a mix of milk and water (half/half) it really makes it more tender and the strong smell is gone. Then you wash it well and cook it as the recipe says.

Or a pinch of cinnamon while cooking the food, helps too. Turks did this and I learnt it a few years ago from a documentry on TV.
 
Souvlaki Harry and I were brought up in Wales where I live now. Welsh lamb is the best in the world. I know the smell you talk about both New Zealand and Australian imports have it.
HCC Meat Promotion Wales

ps I live 20 minutes from Corwen which is mentioned.
 
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Yes Bolas I know. I have eaten lamb hat was not smelling to strong only once in my life, and it was grown by an old man high in the mountains, where green and flowers are abundant.

What can I say , you are lucky :)
 
Souvlaki I would swap you the Lamb for your weather, you are lucky.
I would swap you the lamb for blue sea and starry night.
I would swap you the lamb for civilised coffee and conversation in your country, you are very lucky.:)
 
I wish I could get lean lamb here. I made a lamb shoulder on sunday half of that should have been thrown away, it was all fat. Thogh I have to say fat does give a great flavoe when cooking, so I threw it away afterwards.

wow Harry, you got me here. I am crazy about lamb, and I can not resist eggplants in any form (sweet, cooked, baked, grilled, cooked).
And it just happens that I have a kilogram of lamb in the freezer.

Thank you :)

If you have time you could try and cook the lamb in a mix of milk and water (half/half) it really makes it more tender and the strong smell is gone. Then you wash it well and cook it as the recipe says.

Or a pinch of cinnamon while cooking the food, helps too. Turks did this and I learnt it a few years ago from a documentry on TV.

Souvlaki Harry and I were brought up in Wales where I live now. Welsh lamb is the best in the world. I know the smell you talk about both New Zealand and Australian imports have it.
HCC Meat Promotion Wales

ps I live 20 minutes from Corwen which is mentioned.
all i can say is to repeat what bro' bolas said.welsh lamb is the best.lean but with enough fat,no smell,tender & tasty....the cream of the crop is the saltmarsh lamb that is grazed on the saltmarshes of the island of anglesey...croeso y cymru chaps!!
 
Man that sure looks scrumptious.

I guess it is time for me, in my elder age, to enter into a new realm of cooking and start using a tagine.

Thanks for posting it.
 
I am thinking I know what dish is next for the funny looking stove top slow cooker. :)

Thanks Harry.
 
I wish I could get lean lamb here. I made a lamb shoulder on sunday half of that should have been thrown away, it was all fat. Thogh I have to say fat does give a great flavoe when cooking, so I threw it away afterwards.
Ditto--lamb is so expensive here, I rarely buy it. Even if you buy a lamb and have it butchered, it runs about 8 lb/#, whereas beef is around $3.29/lb cut and wrapped if you buy a side. "This woman" is not rich.
 
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Just the opposite here. We get a half lamb every spring from a guy in Wisconsin for (I think) $3.50 a pound. This year it came out to about half of what I paid for bulk grass-fed beef.
 
Ditto--lamb is so expensive here, I rarely buy it. Even if you buy a lamb and have it butchered, it runs about 8 lb/#, whereas beef is around $3.29/lb cut and wrapped if you buy a side. "This woman" is not rich.

Just the opposite here. We get a half lamb every spring from a guy in Wisconsin for (I think) $3.50 a pound. This year it came out to about half of what I paid for bulk grass-fed beef.
that's interesting that "this woman's;)" lamb is the same price as your beef steve.over here british beef & lamb are similar prices in the shops too...even on our tiny island.but,like you,if i take a short drive to wales(not a short drive for you i know steve:LOL:) & buy a butchered lamb or half lamb the savings are huge......so who is making the big profits eh? not the farmers for sure!
pork,even outdoor raised pork is relatively cheap over here,probably our cheapest meat,and i have made this tagine with pork shoulder....better than with lamb in some respects.....paprika & pork are lovers aren't they?
also made it with stewing steak....also good.
so,if lamb is prohibitive in cost why not try pork or beef....you won't regret it.
you've got hens & decorum cw..."this woman's" a millionaire!!
 
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