How Should Lamb Chops be Cooked?

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To me "lamby tasting lamb" translates to Mutton. :sick:

Nasty tasting meat, Mutton, and the smell is even worse.

A lamb over a year old is Mutton. I suspect people who don't like "lamb" have only had Mutton.
 
To me "lamby tasting lamb" translates to Mutton. :sick:

Nasty tasting meat, Mutton, and the smell is even worse.

A lamb over a year old is Mutton. I suspect people who don't like "lamb" have only had Mutton.

Brings to mind that episode of Seinfeld where he ditches his girlfriend's mutton from his plate into his coat with a napkin. Someone borrows his coat later on and gets hounded by a pack of dogs. :LOL:
 
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To me "lamby tasting lamb" translates to Mutton. :sick:

Nasty tasting meat, Mutton, and the smell is even worse.

A lamb over a year old is Mutton. I suspect people who don't like "lamb" have only had Mutton.

In the Bahamas and in Jamaica, mutton is usually goat. I've had curried mutton in both places and it was quite good, not the least bit gamey.
 
The best lamb chops I've ever had were from a buffet at a resort in the Dominican Republic. Teeny tiny, barely cooked, but so good.

I have yet to try goat. When we were in Bonaire, goat stew was the special at one place, and was highly recommended and quite popular.

Mutton is not something I want to try again. Once was enough. Too gamey for moi.
 
The best lamb chops I've ever had were from a buffet at a resort in the Dominican Republic. Teeny tiny, barely cooked, but so good.

I have yet to try goat. When we were in Bonaire, goat stew was the special at one place, and was highly recommended and quite popular.

Mutton is not something I want to try again. Once was enough. Too gamey for moi.

If the chops were that small the lamb was probably milk fed Dawg.

I fell in love with some baby lambs I bottle fed in New Zealand and I thought I'd never be able to eat lamb again. :wub: I got over it though.
 
If the chops were that small the lamb was probably milk fed Dawg.

I fell in love with some baby lambs I bottle fed in New Zealand and I thought I'd never be able to eat lamb again. :wub: I got over it though.


Oh no! I'm sort of a farm girl, but not quite. Not sure I could eat something I named and fed!
 
I've seen them at Costco.Had a tough time buying them.
Were due for another run at Costco. Your right if you want something done right do it yourself.

That dinner was my first at try trying Lamb. It was a huge hurdle for me to get past what I raised as an FFA project. LOL!!!!:LOL::ROFLMAO:

I had 4-H kids that knew from day one that they only named their animals for the sole purpose of selling them at the fair. Others were so attached to them, that I had a dorm full of young kids crying because they got top dollar for their animal. One girl who got $10,000 for her prize bull, she left the fair sobbing. She had delivered him and nursed him with a bottle. Even had the guts to lead him in the show and herding part. Every other kid had an adult male step in. I have never forgotten her. So I can understand what you are saying. :angel:
 
Mutton is typically sheep, and it *is* quite gamey. We had it in Ireland.

I'm aware of that, but in the Caribbean, sheep and goat are both mutton (at least on islands like the Bahamas and Jamaica with British backgrounds), and goat is far more common. When you see curry mutton on a restaurant menu, you can be 90% certain that it's goat.
 
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The feedback on this meal kit was "awesome, frigging amazing, whooza."My Dad loved it when I made it for him, but I think he was just really impressed that my name was one the recipe card. He loves it when I send him articles I've written. He has all of them in a binder. And has added this to the binder.
 

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The feedback on this meal kit was "awesome, frigging amazing, whooza."My Dad loved it when I made it for him, but I think he was just really impressed that my name was one the recipe card. He loves it when I send him articles I've written. He has all of them in a binder. And has added this to the binder.

Congratulations! Those photo shots are amazing. Too bad Mom can't fully appreciate your professional efforts with food. Sounds like Dad is going to have a binder full of your work. He may have to go to Binder #2. :angel:
 
The feedback on this meal kit was "awesome, frigging amazing, whooza."My Dad loved it when I made it for him, but I think he was just really impressed that my name was one the recipe card. He loves it when I send him articles I've written. He has all of them in a binder. And has added this to the binder.

I wish it was large enough to read. That's way too small for my eyes.:huh:
 
Unfortunately, the file is 4 MB which exceeds DC's size for pdfs. If you PM me with your email addy, I will send it as a pdf attachment.
 
CWS's "Swedish Inspired Lamb Chops With Dill Sauce and Hasselback Potatoes". Don't ask for the ingredients list, though. Impossible to read at posted size when you click on the image, fuzzy beyond belief if you increase the size through your browser.
 
Congratulations! Those photo shots are amazing. Too bad Mom can't fully appreciate your professional efforts with food. Sounds like Dad is going to have a binder full of your work. He may have to go to Binder #2. :angel:

How curious that Addie can see what the rest of us don't! There must be a secret.
 
Ok. My dad was a butcher, so I grew up on this stuff. Your photo isn't a shoulder (or blade) chop, nor is it an arm steak, which is just the part of the shoulder cut extending into the front leg, and which tends to be a little more fatty. It's a lamb round steak, also called a leg steak or leg chop. It's a cut from the thigh and one of the more muscled parts of the animal. The bone running through it is the femur. Andy's photo correctly shows a shoulder chop.

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I'm confused - On your diagram the shoulder and front shank and rear shank cuts shows a picture of a cut with a round bone in it like Caslon posted.
 
Yep, I'm updated now on what my parents used to buy decades ago, it was a leg lamb chop, rather than a shoulder chop like I originally posted. Tougher cut of lamb. I liked how they were "chop" shaped. It's hard now to find a chop shaped shoulder lamb chop from where I buy these days. Occasionally I find a package that has two reasonably shaped shoulder lamb chops in the pack. I buy and freeze them.

Also, yes...lamb leg chops have less fat in them, less tender, less seen in supermarkets now. I liked how leg chops were so...chop shaped. Oval, a round bone at one end. I see packaged "shoulder chops" today in my supermarket and wonder...wth?
 

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