How to make a rice with ghee/butter/oil in pressure cooker?

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pressurecooker

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This is my procedure to cook rice.
1:1 ratio of water and rice. Soak for some time. Put in pressure cooker. And cook till 2 whistles.
When do I add ghee/butter here? I'm really confused.
 

pepperhead212

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Welcome to the forum!

I've seen recipes calling for adding the ghee, or other butter, after opening from the cooking (seems to hold the flavor better this way), while there have been others in which the rice was sautéed in the ghee briefly, before the liquid was added. One thing that seemed best, with rice and other grains, when pressure cooking, is to use the lower pressure (if your cooker has that feature), but for longer, to prevent the grains from "exploding", so to speak.
 

cookiecrafter

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I'm assuming that you are making long grain white rice. When pressuring rice, (2 cups water & 1 cup rice) you should only double the recipe (4 cups water & 2 cups rice). When the pressure cooker regulator sounds off two whistles stop the power. Let the pot cool until the pressure stops. Stir the rice around and add the butter.
 

Badjak

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Or maybe more like the Portuguese cook rice. Heat oil, put rice, stir till all rice is covered, add water and continue cooking.
Never tried it in a pressure cooker though.
 

pressurecooker

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I'm assuming that you are making long grain white rice. When pressuring rice, (2 cups water & 1 cup rice) you should only double the recipe (4 cups water & 2 cups rice). When the pressure cooker regulator sounds off two whistles stop the power. Let the pot cool until the pressure stops. Stir the rice around and add the butter.
Thanks. I'll add butter at the end once cooked.
 

pressurecooker

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Welcome to the forum!

I've seen recipes calling for adding the ghee, or other butter, after opening from the cooking (seems to hold the flavor better this way), while there have been others in which the rice was sautéed in the ghee briefly, before the liquid was added. One thing that seemed best, with rice and other grains, when pressure cooking, is to use the lower pressure (if your cooker has that feature), but for longer, to prevent the grains from "exploding", so to speak.
Adding butter at the end won't be that good imo. I'm not sure how people cook it in pressure cooker. If I add ghee/butter along with water+rice+butter at first before heating, I think that'd be not great and require tons of ghee.
 

dragnlaw

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Hope noted that the ratio is 2 water - 1 rice? If I may suggest, use ghee only after cooking. If that works for you then stay with that method. After you know how to do the rice without the ghee then next time try it with the ghee.
Think that is the only way you will know what is best way for you.
 

pressurecooker

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Hope noted that the ratio is 2 water - 1 rice? If I may suggest, use ghee only after cooking. If that works for you then stay with that method. After you know how to do the rice without the ghee then next time try it with the ghee.
Think that is the only way you will know what is best way for you.
but I cook really good with 1:1 ratio of water:rice. It'd be too "soft" if I add 2x water. I'm using Indian rice for your information. Not sure if that's basmati, but it's commonly used rice here.
 

pepperhead212

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1:1 ratio is the right ratio, @pressurecooker - from what I understand, there is very little steam released from a pressure cooker, unlike a regular pot, plus, it cooks faster. Using the old fashioned 2:1 would result in a very soggy rice - did that the first time I ever cooked rice in my Instant Pot! Then, I read the instructions! lol They even say to use 1:1 for brown rice, which usually calls for more water, since it takes longer to cook, and more steam is released, in a regular pot.
 

Badjak

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I only know how to cook in pressure cooker.
So, if you are happy to try...
Melt ghee in pressure cooker. Add rice, cook/fry for a couple of minutes. Add water like you normally do and cook like you normally do.
A portuguese/jewish friend of mine cooked his rice via this method (although not in the pressure cooker). He swore it would keep the grains nice and seperate.

On the other hand, cooking rice in a "normal" pan is not very difficult
 

dragnlaw

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OMG*wd, colour me stupid. I never knew that frying/toasting was what made a dish a pilaf!

Gads...
I'm gonna look like a rainbow pretty soon. Probably a muddy one at that.
 

pressurecooker

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It depends on rice and the way you're going to cook it guys water:rice ratio. the new rice we got now has recommened rice:water=1:1.5 and asked to cook in mild flame. Thank you for pilaf though. I'm going to enjoy it whenever I'm alone at home. How much frying is necessary in pilaf though? Any idea? For how long?
 

cookiecrafter

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When I asked the women why they were frying their rice before boil, it is to remove the starch which can cause it to be gritty during boil.
 

medtran49

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It depends on rice and the way you're going to cook it guys water:rice ratio. the new rice we got now has recommened rice:water=1:1.5 and asked to cook in mild flame. Thank you for pilaf though. I'm going to enjoy it whenever I'm alone at home. How much frying is necessary in pilaf though? Any idea? For how long?
You cook it long enough for the grains to change color. The rice grains absorb the fat and kind of become translucent? You'll know it when you see it. You have to stir it pretty often, not constantly, but close.

You can also cook it long enough for the grains to start browning. The flavor gets nuttier, the best way I know to describe, the longer you cook it.

Yes, jasmine and basmati are usually 1 part rice to 1.5 liquid.

Our favorite and simplest pilaf is to first sautee in half and half butter and oil chopped onions and celery, then add some chopped mushrooms then add the rice (long grain), chicken stock for liquid, S and P, bring to a boil, turn off heat and let sit for 20 minutes at least while rest of meal cooks.
 
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