My new pot

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lyndalou

Head Chef
Joined
Sep 9, 2004
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2,416
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USA,Florida
My daughter heard my "hint" that I would love to have a Le Creuset Dutch Oven and she bought me one for Christmas. I am very happy. The pot she gave me is called a French Oven. Any difference?
 

GB

Chief Eating Officer
Joined
Jul 14, 2004
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25,510
Location
USA,Massachusetts
Same thing, just a different name. My Le Crueset French oven is my favorite pot in my kitchen. I am sure you will love yours!
 

Otter

Sous Chef
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Sep 1, 2004
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973
Location
USA,Minnesota
The Dutch call their pots of that style Dutch Ovens. The French call their pots of that style French Ovens. I have a Le Creuset and love it - very good heat distribution and retention. Just yesterday I seared some chuck roast on the stovetop and finished in the oven, adding veggies for the last hour. Take good care of it and it will last you a long while.
 

lyndalou

Head Chef
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Sep 9, 2004
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USA,Florida
It's a 7 quart. I'll be using it for the first time on Sunday when I prepare Beef Bourgnion (sp?) for a few friends. Can't wait.
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
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49,408
Location
Massachusetts
Congrats!

The 7-quart is the most versatile size, in my opinion, for making stews and pot roasts, etc. It's big enough to hold the recipe ingredients without being too big to handle.

P. S. Boeuf Bourguignon is one of my favorites!
 

Michael in FtW

Master Chef
Moderator Emeritus
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Sep 5, 2004
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Fort Worth, TX
Actually, lyndalou, "French oven" is the correct name for what you got.

The term "Dutch Oven" has been so missued that most people don't know what one is anymore. Lodge, the great cast iron cookware maker, even screws it up these days.

A "Dutch Oven" is just a plain (no enamel) cast iron pot, generally 6-8 qt, has a bail handle, with 3 short legs and a flat lid that has about a 1-inch lip around the edge. To use it you placed it over coals and heaped some on top (the lip kept the coals from sliding off the top) - or you dug a pit and put coals in the bottom and round the sides of the pot, and more on top. Since the pot heated the food inside from all directions - thus the "oven" part of the name. There is a debate about where the "Dutch" part of the name came from ... some claim it was from the Dutch peddlers who sold them, others claim it got the name from the sand cast molding process which the Dutch invented.

I think Le Creuset French ovens are great! And, 7-qt is just about the most perfect size. Treat it with respect (don't go beating metal utensils on the edge like some TV chefs do - use wood spoons) and you should have many happy years using it.
 

mjsorkin

Assistant Cook
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
23
I just ordered the seven quart round oven for myself the other day. It's my fourth piece of Le Creuset. I also have a 5 quart oval, an eight inch grill pan, and an 8 quart steel stockpot (the stockpot and the oval were gifts). I got the seven quart for dishes where I need more surface area on the bottom than my 5 qt oval, and for making larger batches of chili etc. I'm having some second thoughts that maybe the 9 quart would have been better, but I'm pretty sure I'll be happy with this. It's reassuring to hear people say that the seven quart is the best size. Congratulations to both of us!
 

lyndalou

Head Chef
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Thanks for the info and good wishes. I will be good to the pot, I promise. I forgot to mention that the package included a small grill as well. Just right for 4 burgers. I have used that already. Love it! :D
 

Andy M.

Certified Pretend Chef
Joined
Sep 1, 2004
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49,408
Location
Massachusetts
Michael in FtW said:
...A "Dutch Oven" is just a plain (no enamel) cast iron pot, generally 6-8 qt, has a bail handle, with 3 short legs and a flat lid that has about a 1-inch lip around the edge. ...


I always thought the "Dutch" part of the name was in reference to the fact that it's not a real oven. You know, like a Dutch uncle is not a real uncle.

Of course, you have to be careful with these pots. Clean them thoroughly with Dutch Cleanser so you won't get in Dutch with your Dutch Uncle. If you ruin the pan, you'll have to toss it out through the Dutch doors. :D
 

Pam Leavy

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 13, 2004
Messages
248
Location
Netherlands
Andy M. said:
Michael in FtW said:
...A "Dutch Oven" is just a plain (no enamel) cast iron pot, generally 6-8 qt, has a bail handle, with 3 short legs and a flat lid that has about a 1-inch lip around the edge. ...


I always thought the "Dutch" part of the name was in reference to the fact that it's not a real oven. You know, like a Dutch uncle is not a real uncle.

Of course, you have to be careful with these pots. Clean them thoroughly with Dutch Cleanser so you won't get in Dutch with your Dutch Uncle. If you ruin the pan, you'll have to toss it out through the Dutch doors. :D

I love it!! Have never seen a Dutch oven since living in The Netherlands. perhaps the Dutch comes from Pennsylvania Dutch (German).

I have heard tell of a cooking method involving straw. Not sure how it worked, but it involved surrounding the lidded pan with straw and allowing it to burn away very slowly. Not sure what it is called. I think the pan must have been buried.

pam
 

mjsorkin

Assistant Cook
Joined
Oct 9, 2004
Messages
23
Shame on you Andy. You can't throw Le Creuset through the dutch door. You have to throw it out the french windows.



By the way, I got the grill too. It sounds like we got the same deal lyndalou.
 
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