Omelet Overcooked!

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babaliaris

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Aug 31, 2017
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Nea Tenedos
Hello!

I tried to make this omelette https://youtu.be/e8zc_DRv6cU but I overcooked it to the bottom. I used very very low heat ( electrical not gas) and I cooked it about to 30 seconds. I don't know what I did wrong, usually when I make an ordinary omelette it takes at least 1 minute and more to be cooked well (I'm covering it to keep the steam on top of the omelette).

I used only butter, not olive oil. I noticed that the omelette absorbed all the butter in 10 seconds, so this might be the problem. Should I use extra olive oil with the butter, to keep the omelette frying without burning it?

Maybe this omelette is cooking faster that an ordinary, and this is where I miscalculate.

Any advices?

Thanks 😊
 

babaliaris

Cook
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Aug 31, 2017
Messages
75
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Nea Tenedos
No, I actually wanted to make the souffle. Sorry, I thought it was not so different from an omelet this is why I choose this name. I know how to make an omelet and I never overlooking it. But I overcooked this souffle even that I was careful.
 

medtran49

Executive Chef
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It's actually a fluffy omelet, not a souffle. If you look at the comments, several people had your problem and ended up adding more butter/oil, especially if they didn't use a nonstick pan.
 

babaliaris

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Messages
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Nea Tenedos
It's actually a fluffy omelet, not a souffle. If you look at the comments, several people had your problem and ended up adding more butter/oil, especially if they didn't use a nonstick pan.
Thank you for your answer! Next time I'll try to do this. Two spoons of olive oil and one spoon of butter for the taste. I will also cook it for 20 seconds and the check it, because if I'm not mistaken, this omelet is cooking a lot faster than a regular.
 

babaliaris

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Nea Tenedos
I would like to ask one more thing. When I cooked it, it was very fluffy but when I served it, it deflated in a matter of seconds and looked miserable. Do you know why this happened?
 

medtran49

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Any souffle or omelet using that technique is going to start deflating as soon as it is done and comes off the heat, and even faster once you cut into it. Also, you have to be careful and not overbeat your egg whites either initially or when folding in the yolks, though I have always folded in the whites after lightening the yolks with a bit of the whites first.
 

babaliaris

Cook
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Aug 31, 2017
Messages
75
Location
Nea Tenedos
Any souffle or omelet using that technique is going to start deflating as soon as it is done and comes off the heat, and even faster once you cut into it. Also, you have to be careful and not overbeat your egg whites either initially or when folding in the yolks, though I have always folded in the whites after lightening the yolks with a bit of the whites first.
I think I made a mistake here. I used a mixer to beat the whites until they become like a creme. I beat the yolks separately with a spoon, and then I inserted it little by little in the creme and at the same time I was folding it with a spoon.
 

babaliaris

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Before I insert the yolks , the creme was hard, but after the yolks and the folding, the creme became soft. Is this the expected result?
 

medtran49

Executive Chef
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Not sure what you mean by creme. You beat the whites until soft peaks start to form, think rounded hilltops, when you pull up the whisk. Then what I've always done is fold about 1/4 of the whites into the beaten yolks to lighten them, then gently fold in the remaining whites. It doesn't have to be totally mixed either. A few small streaks of white here and there are just fine and won't hurt.
 

babaliaris

Cook
Joined
Aug 31, 2017
Messages
75
Location
Nea Tenedos
Not sure what you mean by creme. You beat the whites until soft peaks start to form, think rounded hilltops, when you pull up the whisk. Then what I've always done is fold about 1/4 of the whites into the beaten yolks to lighten them, then gently fold in the remaining whites. It doesn't have to be totally mixed either. A few small streaks of white here and there are just fine and won't hurt.
Oh, I see, this sounds clever, because I had a hard time mixing the yolks with the whites. You fold 1/4 of the beaten whites to the yolks, or the whites on their initial state?
 

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