Recommended Pressure Canner Brands

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larry_stewart

Master Chef
Joined
Dec 25, 2006
Messages
5,452
Location
Long Island, New York
I may be taking the plunge and getting a pressure canner in the near future. With the amount of potatoes I have ( and the amount I usually throw away do to sprouting or rotting), and have already made enough pierogi, French fries and other things to freeze, I think its time. Inspired by Bliss's ' Canning Potato ' Thread, Im going to do it. Just want some recommended brands ( or ones to stay away from). Any specific features that truly make a difference, or things that are just bells and whistles to inflate the prices.
 

blissful

Master Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
5,073
Oh sure blame me for this spending spree. lol ha ha.
I use an antique model, magic chef that I bought for $10 from my then boyfriend, now husband. It takes about $35 to replace the seal, the pressure button, and a rocker and valve. If you look at them, you'll realize they are actually the exact same model that later came out as presto, and 10 other companies (stamped right on the metal label).
The most expensive but heralded the best are the all-american models as they use no seal, they seal metal to metal...much more expensive. Presto is great too and much less expensive with a rubber seal. What you need to watch for in buying used in if the bottom is flat. If it is not flat it may be heat damaged (warped) and it cannot be fixed and it is not safe.

You can join a group that has even more information, a facebook group Canning and Preserving with Love is a huge group of current canning people that can according to approved safe recipes. They use all kinds of canners. If you join just search it for 'types of canners' and ask questions.
I hope that helps!
 

Marlingardener

Senior Cook
Joined
Apr 24, 2022
Messages
273
Location
unincorporated area
I have had a Mirro pressure canner for about 40 years! It works great, is easy to use, and I've only had to replace the gasket once, about 15 years ago.
I do less canning now than I have in the past, but for some vegetables a pressure canner is absolutely necessary. I'm sure you'll enjoy having one, and finding vegetables other than potatoes to can.
 

larry_stewart

Master Chef
Joined
Dec 25, 2006
Messages
5,452
Location
Long Island, New York
Im looking forward to it. This is the first year I've truly built up my pantry. At a much smaller scale than true canners and preservers, but Im taking baby steps. And with the amount of gardening that I do, even with the kids moved out, garden is still the same size and even expanding ( its like an addiction). Right now, Ive been dehydrating tomatoes, apples, mushrooms ( and some other stuff), canning salsa, tomatoes and jam. Pickling pickles, green tomatoes , peppers and probably a bunch of other stuff im forgetting. For right now, the potatoes are the prime reason Im going to invest in a pressure canner. But Im sure once I feel comfortable, I'll experiment with other things. Usually, when I try new things, I like trying it out on store bought stuff, as I dont want to ruin things I spent a whole season growing. Once I feel comfortable, then I use my own stuff. The winter will be perfect time for me to work out all the bugs, so Im ready for the next growing season.
 

blissful

Master Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
5,073
Larry, there are so many things to try in the winter.
Canned black beans (or red or pinto or whatever kind you want to have on the shelf.)
Soups like taco soup, vegetable soup, habitant soup which come in handy when the cook gets sick (never)...never say never. (I made these for mr feather to heat up for me if I get sick.)
Green beans, yellow beans.
Corn (when it goes on sale on 4 lbs of frozen corn).
Onions (when the stored onions start to grow).
(I still have canned chicken, beef, and venison which my son eats once in a while.)
Peeled roasted red peppers--I haven't done that but I have hatch peppers canned.

A couple quarts of vegetable soup with a bag of dry pasta make a nice little gift for neighbors when the main cook is under the weather.

I should make a case of habitant soup. I'm the only one that likes it but I really like it a lot. We eat similar foods, mr feather and I, but not always at the same times!
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
29,295
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
I had a Presto pressure canner several decades ago. I really liked it. I don't actually remember using it for anything that needs a pressure canner. But, for all the times I used it, not one jar didn't seal properly. It isn't as much of a nuisance to move as a water bath canner full of water, because you only use a small amount of water in a pressure canner.

I don't have it anymore because, my ex insisted on keeping it, when we separated. He didn't want it as a pressure canner, just as a pressure cooker. If I had had any spare money at the time, I would have bought him a small pressure cooker and kept the canner.
 

dragnlaw

Site Team
Staff member
Joined
Feb 16, 2013
Messages
7,989
Location
Waterdown, Ontario
It takes about $35 to replace the seal, the pressure button, and a rocker and valve. If you look at them, you'll realize they are actually the exact same model that later came out as presto, and 10 other companies (stamped right on the metal label).
The most expensive but heralded the best are the all-american models as they use no seal, they seal metal to metal...much more expensive. Presto is great too and much less expensive with a rubber seal.
bliss, it sounds like you are describing a pressure cooker rather than a pressure canner. I differentiate them as the cooker has the rubber seal, the canner is metal to metal, as you have said above.
The rubber seal one is just with the lid that is given a turn to line up the handles and seal.
The canner one has several screw down to seal metal to metal.

I thought someone here said that only the canner type is good for non-acidic foods. Is that right? Do you have two pressure cookers or canners?
 

blissful

Master Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
5,073
bliss, it sounds like you are describing a pressure cooker rather than a pressure canner. I differentiate them as the cooker has the rubber seal, the canner is metal to metal, as you have said above.
The rubber seal one is just with the lid that is given a turn to line up the handles and seal.
The canner one has several screw down to seal metal to metal.

I thought someone here said that only the canner type is good for non-acidic foods. Is that right? Do you have two pressure cookers or canners?
No, I'm describing a pressure canner.
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
3,762
Location
Woodbury, NJ

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
29,295
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
My Presto pressure canner was sold as a pressure canner and had the rack for putting the jars on, inside the canner. It had a rubber gasket. It didn't have any screw closures. The lid was forged with flanges and so was the pot. The lid would twist into place. It was pretty convincing that the lid wasn't going to come off unintentionally, even with a lot of pressure inside.
 
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