Sherry Wine

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Sherry is a fortified wine. It is wine with some distilled spirits added to it. It is the Spanish fortified wine. Port is the Portuguese version, Marsala is the Italian version and so on. Most fortified wines are sweet and the recipe will call for it rather than dry wine to provide a touch of sweetness. I'm sure you can find fortified wine in any liquor store. Our local supermarket has all the versions.
 
When I make Asian food in many cases it calls for Sherry. All I can find in stores is sherry wine vinegar. I cannot find sherry wine even in liquor stores.
What's up with this?
I do see it online. But when searching sherry wine most results are for sherry wine vinegar.
TIA
Sherry is used as a substitute for the traditional/authentic ingredient: shaoxing wine.

Shaoxing wine is much better to use than sherry.

you can find it at Asian markets and on Amazon

 
I've never had much trouble finding sherry, and as noted, it's usually near the fortified wines. Some liquor stores don't have super knowledgeable staff or some know craft beers but not cooking wine. Easier to find than port. Ten dollar bottle and lasts for a long time. If you can't find it, grab Shaoxing wine off amazon (it's inexpensive) or sub a cheap dry white wine.
 
Sherry is a fortified wine. It is wine with some distilled spirits added to it. It is the Spanish fortified wine. Port is the Portuguese version, Marsala is the Italian version and so on. Most fortified wines are sweet and the recipe will call for it rather than dry wine to provide a touch of sweetness. I'm sure you can find fortified wine in any liquor store. Our local supermarket has all the versions.
Sherry, Port, and Marsala are NOT versions of the same thing. They are made from completely different grapes, and with different processes. Each of them is highly restricted by their respective countries. The only thing they have in common is that they are all fortified wines. They are not necessarily sweet - especially sherry.

If you order sherry, you will usually get a dry wine - unless you ask for a cream sherry (an intentionally sweetened oloroso) or a Pedro Ximenez (a dessert wine). Marsala comes in both sweet and dry varieties. Port tends to be sweeter, but the degree of sweetness varies depending on whether you have white, tawny, or ruby port.
 
After I could not find it in any grocery store I called every liquor store in my area. None had it. I did not go in person. I'm not sure if I said "Dry" would have been different. But I will use "dry" in future searches in my area.
There is little in the way of things like this in this town. It's meat and potato's. It's better than it was when I first moved here.
@medtran49. We do have Publix but the closest one is about 25 miles unlike Florida where they are everywhere. They are opening a new one on the July 4th weekend much closer to us. 10 miles. Best part is it's a country drive through tree lined back roads with little if any cars or trucks. Shady too.
I look forward to it and I think a lot of my shopping woes will be relieved.

I used the term here so I could differentiate between vinegar and wine. I have always just called it sherry. Never drank any before, but know it.
Like I said. Sherry wine vinegar is easy to get in every store like Rotwein. Sherry (wine) is not.
Started off with a cheap Cantina Cabernet Sauvignon Wine Kit for just £26, actually quite drinkable plonk in a stupidly short amount of time.
Next the Beaverdale 5 Gallon Cabernet Shiraz Wine Kit for £42. Really quite good, as nice as some wine I buy... And I only bought this as it was the only beaverdale in stock.

I wonder what next? I only drink red, normally 8 quid a bottle from Naked or Laithewaites. Is it worth going up to a premium brand or is the mid price kit the best option? In either case what brand... I particularly like malbec and cabernet sauvignon.
What's the sweet spot for price Vs quality?
 

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