Substituting frozen for fresh spinach

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crankin

Senior Cook
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Mar 31, 2007
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I am preparing a lasagna recipe that calls for 10 cups of fresh spinach, which is then steamed and chopped and put in the lasagna. To save time and money, I want to use frozen spinach, but I am not sure how much to use. And, would I use frozen chopped spinach, or frozen leaf spinach (I've seen both at the grocery store)?
 
This is what Cook's Thesaurus says about spinach. One pound fresh = 1 cup cooked = 5 ounces frozen. I've never heard of measuring raw fresh spinach in cups.
 
Third the squeeze. I don't think it matters if it's chopped or leaf.
 
Since the recipe calls for spinach that is steamed, then chopped, I would substitute 2 (10 oz.) boxes of frozen chopped spinach for a pan of lasagna. Thaw first and squeeze out the water, as mentioned.
 
Leaf OR chopped frozen doesn't matter which, thawed. Then put it a bit at a time in a ricer and squeeze it dry.
 

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I never thought of using my potato rice for that! It is generally only brought out when I'm making lefse to rice the leftover mashed potatoes. I generally use a dish towel to wring the water out of frozen spinach, kale, or swiss chard.
 
I never thought of using my potato rice for that! It is generally only brought out when I'm making lefse to rice the leftover mashed potatoes. I generally use a dish towel to wring the water out of frozen spinach, kale, or swiss chard.
It works great for spinach.
 
Since we're talking about squeezing spinach...
Is there any trick to get it to "unsqueeze" after you squeeze the moisture from it? Any way to get it to look like spinach again and not a cow's cud?
 
Since we're talking about squeezing spinach...
Is there any trick to get it to "unsqueeze" after you squeeze the moisture from it? Any way to get it to look like spinach again and not a cow's cud?

:LOL: Sometimes I squeeze out as much as I can (the ricer does work well - you end up with more of a patty than a cud) then stir the spinach around in a big skillet over medium heat, which helps more of the moisture to cook away, then add the rest of the ingredients to the skillet..
 
I was trying to pull it apart again to add to a lasagna. I didn't really want to chop it up any more than it already was.
Maybe this is where those salad spinners could come in handy.
 
I spin first and then squeeze. Maybe trying to squeeze first and then spin is the trick? Although, I like the idea of using the ricer--it would mean it would come out of storage more than once a year! It seems like a frivolous thing to have since I only use it for lefse...but then, I only use my krumkake iron for krumkake...
 
It's hilarious all these replies without an answer.

And someone ACTUALLY said they never heard of measuring fresh spinach in cups?

It's 1/4 C steamed = 1 C fresh.

So to get 10 cups you do .25 C x 4 = will equal 1 cup fresh

Do that ten times hahaha.


(All you had to do was steam a cup fresh in the microwave/stove to find out.)
 
It's hilarious all these replies without an answer.

And someone ACTUALLY said they never heard of measuring fresh spinach in cups?

It's 1/4 C steamed = 1 C fresh.

So to get 10 cups you do .25 C x 4 = will equal 1 cup fresh

Do that ten times hahaha.


(All you had to do was steam a cup fresh in the microwave/stove to find out.)
You know what else is hilarious? This thread is almost 13 years old so that spinach is probably in someone's tomato garden right now! 🤣 🤣 🤣
 
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