Today's harvest

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Wife did a final pick of our garden.
Few frilly bright green lettuce leaves, cilantro and basil.
She was a step ahead of as she knew I was making thai salad for family dinner last night
She bought a bag of mixed salad a cucumber and shoots etc. Along with cherry tomatoes.
Cucumber was cut into batons and d.i.l bought a cooked chicken. I made a dressing to suit.
Roasted potatoes with turmeric.
Meal went down a treat.
Nothing left so it was a success.

Russ
 
Yesterday, I harvested some of my spearmint, to make my first mint tea of the season. Just a bunch of 3-4" stalks - not a lot of flavor, at first, but I always look forward to starting to get that mint! And soon, I'll have enough of the peppermint, to start using in Indian dishes.
First harvest of the spearmint, for the first mint tea of the season. 4-10 by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Oh man, I was out looking at my spearmint. All the stems from last year are hard sticks and I couldn't break them off. I need to go out with the pruners and clear them out. My spearmint is barely showing any tiny bit of green.
 
I always let my mint die off in the fall, then weedwack it level with the ground, after removing the driplines. This way, I'm not fighting with any of those old plants, when the new plants show up. I'm already getting 6-7" plants!
 
I always let my mint die off in the fall, then weedwack it level with the ground, after removing the driplines. This way, I'm not fighting with any of those old plants.
I usually do remove them but somehow I forgot and now they are a bigger pain to remove. It's good to hear how you do it. :)
 
Finally harvested the last of last years kale and chard , which over wintered to this year.
 

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Wife did a final pick of our garden.
Few frilly bright green lettuce leaves, cilantro and basil.
She was a step ahead of as she knew I was making thai salad for family dinner last night
She bought a bag of mixed salad a cucumber and shoots etc. Along with cherry tomatoes.
Cucumber was cut into batons and d.i.l bought a cooked chicken. I made a dressing to suit.
Roasted potatoes with turmeric.
Meal went down a treat.
Nothing left so it was a success.

Russ
I appreciate you kept us informed on gardening in the southern hemisphere while we went through winter. The end of the gardening season is both a blessing with some sadness for the end of the season.
 
I appreciate you kept us informed on gardening in the southern hemisphere while we went through winter. The end of the gardening season is both a blessing with some sadness for the end of the season.
Yeah, the end of the gardening season, is the beginning of the following gardening season ( at least for me). Figuring out what you did wrong and what you did right. Making notes for the following year, Organizing all your garden stuff so you know where it is the following year when you need it, and eagerly awaiting the garden catalogues ( old school) to start arriving.
 
Yeah, the end of the gardening season, is the beginning of the following gardening season ( at least for me). Figuring out what you did wrong and what you did right. Making notes for the following year, Organizing all your garden stuff so you know where it is the following year when you need it, and eagerly awaiting the garden catalogues ( old school) to start arriving.

My herb garden is a year round thing. I move the basil indoors, onto my kitchen window sill. The oregano, thyme and rosemary do fine in the winter.

Christmas Day in Texas could be heavy coats and wool hats, or it could be shorts and a t-shirt. We never know until it gets here.

CD
 
I checked on my squash we kept from last year, used them during the winter and I still have 8 or 9 big ones. We had them in one layer in a big box on the basement floor about 55 °F. I need to cook them up before we grow more this summer and my freezer is full. I will be dehydrating them after baking them, then peeling, keeping the seeds, mashing them about 1 inch or less thick on parchment. I might start doing that tonight. The squashes that kept the best were the long island cheese squash and the gray hopi/they also go by another name, blue hubbard (though they are shaped more like the hopi squash, pointy on both ends). I'm not saying we didn't lose any, we did, but not these kinds.
 
I once purchased a Hubbard squash that had dark skin, still bubbly/rough texture but dark like an acorn squash and shaped more round without the pointy ends.
That thing was huge, I had to take it out on the patio and slam it down to break... didn't work! in the end I used an axe. Never bought another one.
Family said it was delicious but I was so tired of fighting with it I could not enjoy. Froze a lot, don't really remember much other than that - was in the 70's sometime, LOL, about 50 years ago!
Just remembered why I bought it.... was only about 79 cents - and at that time, the US dollar was cheaper than the Canadian.
 
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Harvested 4 cabbages, a bowl of peas and a pot full of chard today. Red currants and honey berries in full gear. String beans , Kirby's and blue berries trickling in ( about a week or two earlier than usual). Onions starting to Bulb and keeping a close eye on the garlic due to waterlogged issues the past few years. At this point, they're looking pretty good. Scapes all picked.
 

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