What's Your Signature Dish?

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Kylie1969

Chef Extraordinaire
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Jun 24, 2012
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Australia
This sounds delightful, thanks for sharing :)


For what it's worth...

Seafood Gumbo

Ingredients:

Part-A, (common to all gumbo):

4 Tbl. Oil
4 Tbl. Flour
1 Large Onion, Diced
1 Can (14.5 oz.) diced tomatoes (Rotel (Mild) also works well.)
1 Bell Pepper, Diced (I prefer the red or yellow, but green is traditional.)
1 Stalks Celery, Diced
1/4 Cup Chopped Parsley
1/4 tsp. Thyme
1 Tbl. Basil
1/2 tsp. Worcestershire Sauce
1 tsp. Louisiana Hot Sauce
2 Quarts Water (or as an option, 1 qt. Chicken Stock + 1 qt. Water)
2 Tbl. Gumbo Filè (pronounced fee-lay)
Salt & Pepper to taste

Part-B, Add your previously diced and cooked protein(s) and a simmer for at least an hour. Again, the longer the better, (except in the case of Seafood Gumbo. Only add the shrimp two minutes before serving.).

Seafood option: Shrimp, oysters, crab, lobster.

Directions:

Make a dark roux by browning the flour in the oil, constantly stirring over medium-low heat (15-30 minutes - the slower the better).
Add the finished roux to a stock or crock pot.

Add everything else in Part-A to the pot and stir to combine with the roux.

Bring to a low simmer.

Add your previously cooked and diced protein(s) and simmer for at least an hour. (except in the case of Seafood Gumbo. Only add the shrimp two minutes before serving.)

Serve in a bowl on a bed of rice and make additional Gumbo Filè available for seasoning.
 

CWS4322

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Jan 2, 2011
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Rural Ottawa, Ontario
I finally thought of what it is my friends request: My Condolences Beef Stew (which used to be my Venison-Beer Stew, but when venison was no longer part of my freezer stock, I started making it with beef and giving it to friends when something bad happened, hence how it got renamed). I will have to dig out the recipe in the fall.
 

Kylie1969

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Jun 24, 2012
Messages
13,111
Location
Australia
I have a few signature dishes. One of my favorites can be served for any meal, but I usually save it for Sunday Brunch and embellish it with sides and mimosas or bellinis.


CHORIZO
Ingredients:
  • 2 pounds ground goat (traditional), pork, beef, or turkey
  • 4 cloves mashed garlic
  • 6 Tbs chili powder (If you like it mild, use Ancho chili powder, if you like it spicy, use New Mexico chili powder)
  • 2 Tbs oregano
  • 2 Tbs olive oil
  • 2 Tbs water
  • 2 Tbs vinegar
  • 1½ tsp sugar
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
  • ½ tsp fresh ground black pepper
Instructions:

Mix all ingredients together in a bowl, divide into quarters, roll each quarter into a log, and wrap each log with plastic wrap, twisting the ends to secure. Can be refrigerated for 3 to 5 days or frozen for up to three months.

This one sounds delicious :chef:
 

Margi Cintrano

Washing Up
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Jan 29, 2012
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Both in Italy and Spain
Kylie,

Thank you for all your lovely compliments ... Yes, I have to get back to Madrid to really home gourmet it ... Here in Gargano, one is too lax with the surf and cafés ...

Kind regards,

T.U. again, Margi.
 

GotGarlic

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Joined
May 9, 2007
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27,086
Location
Southeastern Virginia
SOUS VIDE: to seal a portion of seasoned food in a vaccum bag and bake for 2 hours in a steam overn at 65 degrees centigrade or 149 farenheit. Then the food item is removed and put into shock in an ice bath to cool down ... This process works as a tenderizer.

Is this your method for the octopus? The way you have it written, it looks like a definition of sous vide, which involves putting the seasoned, bagged food in a water bath set to the final desired cooking temperature, which may not be 149*. The process is used to gently cook food, infuse it with flavor, and prevent overcooking. The timing depends on the food being cooked and the desired end temperature.
 

Siegal

Sous Chef
Joined
Nov 4, 2011
Messages
545
I wish I had a picture but my husbands favorite dish that I make is probably flanken that is simmered with garlic and spices (allspice, cinnamon, etc) for a few hours and then I cook rice in the simmering liquid with some peas. Simple but good.
 

chopper

Executive Chef
Moderator Emeritus
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Jan 15, 2011
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4,196
Location
Colorado
Hubby says my signature dish is Mac and cheese. I think he's right. I just had some with our ribs tonight. In fact I guess our signature meal together has to be smoked ribs and Mac and cheese. Comfort!
 

niquejim

Senior Cook
Joined
Nov 27, 2009
Messages
441
Location
Cape Coral Florida
I'll have to think about whether I want to post what I believe is my best dish and what some others think is my best dish

I'm going to go with one that I love and several people love. I got the idea from a book about beer and took the idea and made it mine. I'll post the recipe after the drunken stupor that is my birthday.
Chocolate ravioli stuffed with bacon and roasted butternut squash sauteed in bacon fat with garlic, onion and pumpkin seed, with a heavy cream sauce

What's the chance this comes up a year after my drunken stupor is over, but also when I'm too tired to look up the recipe...maybe tomorrow
 

Savannahsmoker

Senior Cook
Joined
Dec 21, 2008
Messages
245
Location
Savannah, GA
Based on what family and friends say mine would be the following done in the pit or grill:

Prime Rib
img_1178090_0_d160928cd34d226becf0c2f10e668af7.jpg


Low and Slow BBQ Spareribs
img_1178090_1_74579dd6ccc307c759acedeb2f4f012b.jpg


Beef Ribs
img_1178090_2_629b7db590f989a4e881a5cd4e30dea2.jpg


Low and Slow BBQ Pork Shoulder for Pulled Pork Que.
img_1178090_3_d8f7dd8d76a9cdec1a2052b023c34ef4.jpg


Smoke/Roasted Chicken
img_1178090_4_ce2e48038e1dc92e7e7e926ddef35285.jpg


Cuban-Style Pork Roast
img_1178090_5_768875d961c5617992169669220d0bd8.jpg


Thanks y'all for looking.
 

PrincessFiona60

Ogress Supreme
Moderator Emeritus
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Jul 14, 2009
Messages
38,955
Location
Wyoming
My eyes are glued to the monitor...I may need a spatula to scrape them off!

Severe meat porn! Thanks for sharing.
 

Dawgluver

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Apr 12, 2011
Messages
25,032
Savannah, you did it again! :yum:

PF, could you please pass the eye spatula when you're done?
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

Certified/Certifiable
Joined
Aug 26, 2004
Messages
12,454
Location
USA,Michigan
Savanah, could you please post your recipe for cuban pork? That just looks great. I know how to make the other dishes. Oh, by the way, those are great looking pictures.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 

Margi Cintrano

Washing Up
Joined
Jan 29, 2012
Messages
3,424
Location
Both in Italy and Spain
Two Hours in Sous Vide Octopus

Buonasera, Good Afternoon.


Prepared for 2 hours in plastic seal special bag, sous vide: 65 degrees centigrade. Marvelously tender. Fresh Octopus is a very common product in both Spain and Italy, and Greece too, and can be prepared in various ways.


Margaux Cintrano.
 
Last edited:

GotGarlic

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
May 9, 2007
Messages
27,086
Location
Southeastern Virginia
Buonasera, Good Afternoon.


For sous vide: 65 degrees centigrade; Europe does not use farenheit measurement.

Margaux Cintrano.

My point is that 65°C/149°F may not be the desired end temperature, depending on the food being cooked with the sous vide method; steak or lamb will typically be finished at lower temperatures, for example. Your description implies that sous vide food must conclude at 65°C/149°F and that is incorrect.

Also, your description says the food should be shocked in cold water before serving. That makes sense for octopus, but typically red meats are served warm or hot. So shocking is not necessarily part of the sous vide process. That's why I asked if the method you wrote is specifically for octopus.
 
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