Yesterday I had an Ethiopian meal

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i like it. do you like it too?
a lot of super soft spicy slow cooked beef

i like the sourness of the injera too
 

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I've eaten Ethiopian a few times and did like it. It was unique flavors and a new experience for me. It was many years ago, so I dont remember exactly what I had. Im pretty sure it was a Vegetarian combo, where they served about 5 or 6 different vegetarian sample stews/ dishes on top of a large injera bread, and had a pile of smaller injera too use with your hands to eat with.
 
Injera.jpg

Injera is served with most dishes, many highly spiced, meats cooked crispy, lots of vegetables.
It sounds like a flatbread of sour dough, fermenting over a couple of days with a strong sour dough taste. I've never tried it but I would probably like it.

Heart disease rates average at 5% in Ethiopia, so probably a very healthy lifestyle.
They have a red lentil stew called Kik Wat: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/245948/kik-wat-ethiopian-red-lentil-stew/ which is 16 servings calling for 1/2 cups of Berbere Seasoning. The Berbere seasoning is made up of:
½ cup ground dried New Mexico chiles
¼ cup paprika
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon ground fenugreek
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground allspice
½ teaspoon ground cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
 
Injera.jpg

Injera is served with most dishes, many highly spiced, meats cooked crispy, lots of vegetables.
It sounds like a flatbread of sour dough, fermenting over a couple of days with a strong sour dough taste. I've never tried it but I would probably like it.

Heart disease rates average at 5% in Ethiopia, so probably a very healthy lifestyle.
They have a red lentil stew called Kik Wat: https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/245948/kik-wat-ethiopian-red-lentil-stew/ which is 16 servings calling for 1/2 cups of Berbere Seasoning. The Berbere seasoning is made up of:
½ cup ground dried New Mexico chiles
¼ cup paprika
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon ground fenugreek
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground allspice
½ teaspoon ground cloves
¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg
Nice info! I have a coworker who grew up in Ethiopia and Chad. He's always talking about he food there. His Aunt actually had a Chadian Restaurant in NYC.
 
I didn't make the injera but I made the kik wat, 1/4th the recipe (since it was so big). It has spices I know mr bliss wouldn't eat but I wanted to try it.
I had it with brown basmati rice, it was GOOD. Very aromatic and slightly spicy. (sans fenugreek and oil)
 
My wife doesn't like spicy, so when I did make It in the past, I had to tone It down a bit. I made the injera once too. It was surprisingly easy to make, I thought it was going to be more complicated, but things went as planned. Could have been beginners luck ;)
 
My wife doesn't like spicy, so when I did make It in the past, I had to tone It down a bit. I made the injera once too. It was surprisingly easy to make, I thought it was going to be more complicated, but things went as planned. Could have been beginners luck ;)
Where did you find the teff? Is that the right word? I'll be right back. Nope, it's spelled "tef".
 
It sounds like a flatbread of sour dough, fermenting over a couple of days with a strong sour dough taste. I've never tried it but I would probably like it.
I like it. It has an odd texture, not bad, just odd. It's sort of spongy or rubbery, but not in a bad way, just unexpected. it also feels almost moist. It really was not what I would have expected.
 
Where did you find the teff? Is that the right word? I'll be right back. Nope, it's spelled "tef".
A supermarket near me has a whole wall of 'Bob's Red Mill' products which has many different kinds of flour, grains ...including Teff.

The best way I can describe the texture is spongy, and almost feels like a moist towel. Very unique compared to other bread like products.
 

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taxy, Google "Bob's Red Mill near me" and they should list grocers that carry Bob's Red Mill. But not all will carry all of that line. I know the IGA in Alexandria carried a variety of the Red Mill flours, but not all. And the IGA in Rigaud did not carry them at all.
 
taxy, Google "Bob's Red Mill near me" and they should list grocers that carry Bob's Red Mill. But not all will carry all of that line. I know the IGA in Alexandria carried a variety of the Red Mill flours, but not all. And the IGA in Rigaud did not carry them at all.
I was just curious how easy it was to find in the US. If I was looking to get it here, I probably wouldn't have asked someone who lives in the US.
 
taxy, I thought it was a perfectly legit question whether or not you were interested in getting it. Sometime when an ingredient is very common in the States the more likely it will be available here. We can jump on the band wagon too, sometimes we can even lead the band. :LOL:
 
I've never tried teff flour, surprisingly, since I have tried almost every other kind of flour, just to try it! Probably because it is never really on sale anywhere; even the Bob's Red Mill, that is on sale for 40% off occasionally, at Ocean State Job Lot, is not that cheap.
 
Is that the right word? I'll be right back. Nope, it's spelled "tef".
from good old Wiki:
Teff, also known as Eragrostis tef, Williams lovegrass, or annual bunch grass, is an annual grass, a species of lovegrass native to the Horn of Africa, notably to both Eritrea and Ethiopia. It is cultivated for its edible seeds, also known as teff. Teff was one of the earliest plants domesticated.
 
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