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Old 01-09-2005, 11:41 AM   #1
 
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Food Origins

Do you ever wonder the history of certain foods or where they come from? I've always wondered about nutmeg. I think it's comes from a tree in the east indies.. I could be wrong. At least that is what I was told at one time.

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Old 01-09-2005, 12:36 PM   #2
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http://www.recipes4us.co.uk/Specials...es Recipes.htm

"Their first specific place of origin was in the Banda Islands, Indonesia. Dutch explorers, in particular Van den Broeke and Jan Pieterscoon Coen took away the first batch of nutmegs from there in 1608. Their spread and popularity in Europe was meteoric."
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Old 01-09-2005, 12:37 PM   #3
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Im with you Fish. Hey..... I have some ahhhhhhh.... rice and nori that I ummmmmmmm.... need you to take a close look at. Just dont come fried ok?
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Old 01-09-2005, 12:55 PM   #4
 
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thanks Digital! I'm sure I could have done a search for it, but I thought it would be a good topic. I'm sure I'm not the only one that wonders about things.

Sushi... ahh.. I promise I won't come fried... just don't roll me up with anything.
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Old 01-09-2005, 01:05 PM   #5
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I agree it is a good topic. Your question interested me enough to look into it myself
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Old 01-09-2005, 01:32 PM   #6
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I believe most spices originated in the east indies or india, I know that the vikings brought back cardamom from there and it is used in all baked goods today in scandinavia. It is also a part of madras curry powder. I absolutely love most spices except cumin and anthing realted to it.
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Old 01-09-2005, 01:42 PM   #7
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by norgeskog
I believe most spices originated in the east indies or india, I know that the vikings brought back cardamom from there and it is used in all baked goods today in scandinavia. It is also a part of madras curry powder. I absolutely love most spices except cumin and anthing realted to it.
I know that cardamom is popular in a lot of swedish baking.
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Old 01-09-2005, 03:41 PM   #8
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I absolutely love most spices except cumin and anthing related to it.
I love cumin, but I feel about caraway seeds how you feel about cumin.
Because of them I hate rye bread.

http://www.culinarycafe.com/Spices_Herbs/Cumin.html
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Old 01-09-2005, 04:26 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by fried fish
Quote:
Originally Posted by norgeskog
I believe most spices originated in the east indies or india, I know that the vikings brought back cardamom from there and it is used in all baked goods today in scandinavia. It is also a part of madras curry powder. I absolutely love most spices except cumin and anthing realted to it.
I know that cardamom is popular in a lot of swedish baking.
Norwegian, as well, in fact fried fish, in all scandinavian pastries. If you are not familiar with it, it has a grand falvor in foods.
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Old 01-10-2005, 10:28 AM   #10
 
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How about Hoobergrits soup? Anyone ever heard of it? I read somewhere it's a very old-time yiddish soup. It usually has some root vegetables and potato to add substance, and I think even oatmeal to thicken. I know they used oatmeal as a thickener for soups/stews in early war-times of the 20th century. Basically think of whatever was most available to a poor peasant farmer in the Old Country and make a soup out of it.
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Old 01-10-2005, 10:42 AM   #11
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Lots of Scots dishes use oats as thickeners or even as a staple ingredient - oatcakes are not sweet biscuits, but eaten with cheese or a hearty fried breakfast.

And Scots porridge - wonderful - but please, no sugar or honey or raisins in it please - only a little salt sprinkled on top with a very little amount of milk!
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Old 01-11-2005, 10:12 PM   #12
 
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Personally, I'll go along with the old adage that "It was a brave person, who ate the first oyster"...

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Old 01-12-2005, 02:42 PM   #13
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Personally, I'll go along with the old adage that "It was a brave person, who ate the first oyster"...

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Correct lifter, but what about the first person who found out rhubarb stalks were OK but the leaves were poisoness? Guess that is why the English has beef eaters.
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Old 01-12-2005, 03:26 PM   #14
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what about lobsters. they look like sea cockroaches. did you know that they were snubbed by the rich a hundred years ago or so. only poor people ate them, and the rest were ground into fertilizer.

potatoes were originally thought to be poisonous, then, when introduced to europe (native to the americas), they were accredited with a massive population explosion throughout the 16th to the 19th centuries.
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Old 01-12-2005, 03:29 PM   #15
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Tomatoes were once thought to be poisonous as well. Can you imagine?! They were also once called "love apples", altho the reason why escapes me now.

The Pilgrims used to bait their cages with lobsters to catch eels.
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Old 01-12-2005, 05:05 PM   #16
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what about lobsters. they look like sea cockroaches. did you know that they were snubbed by the rich a hundred years ago or so. only poor people ate them, and the rest were ground into fertilizer.
Buckytom, they are of the same family, you are right on, and I do eat the silly creatures.
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Old 01-13-2005, 12:27 AM   #17
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And Scots porridge - wonderful - but please, no sugar or honey or raisins in it please - only a little salt sprinkled on top with a very little amount of milk!
Argh, I remember when my Granny made it like that for me. Argh disgusting!!!

Give to me with a truckload of brown sugar and a small pool of milk around it :).
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Old 01-13-2005, 10:01 PM   #18
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I love food history and culture, and wish for a category for that alone. History, traditions, science, literature, religion, and personalities (bios and such) of food. I guess I'm talking about the culture surrounding food.
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Old 01-14-2005, 04:29 AM   #19
 
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Concur...

But it would cost endless bandwidth as you and I could enter a ton of 16-19th century cooking notes and recipes that few would read, or amend or try out...just criticize...

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Old 01-14-2005, 05:50 AM   #20
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And Scots porridge - wonderful - but please, no sugar or honey or raisins in it please - only a little salt sprinkled on top with a very little amount of milk!
Argh, I remember when my Granny made it like that for me. Argh disgusting!!!

Give to me with a truckload of brown sugar and a small pool of milk around it :).

PHILISTINE 8)
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