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Old 08-11-2018, 07:27 PM   #1
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Food in the News


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Old 08-11-2018, 07:59 PM   #2
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... and then I found this ...

https://www.hawaiimagazine.com/conte...ide-250-musubi
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Old 08-11-2018, 09:57 PM   #3
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Quelle surprise!! You subscribe to an Hawai'ian magazine!
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Old 08-11-2018, 10:06 PM   #4
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Quelle surprise!! You subscribe to an Hawai'ian magazine!

Dragn, I follow them on social media ...
(and I like the fact that you used the 'okina-glottal stop in english -maika'i-good!!)
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Old 08-11-2018, 11:10 PM   #5
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Didn't know about the okina 'till I saw it on that page... then I had to google it.

Certain traditions should not be lost. I also believe if you are going to use someone's language - use it properly and pronounce it properly (if you can possibly twist your tongue around it -but sometimes I just can't )


When we first went to Europe, we were driving thru France towards Germany. Our destination was a small town, Zweibrucken. It was getting late and Dad was getting lost. Dad spoke both German and French but didn't realize while in France we should have been looking for Deux Pont, tout droit (geradeaus).
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Old 08-12-2018, 05:27 AM   #6
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Didn't know about the okina 'till I saw it on that page... then I had to google it.

Certain traditions should not be lost. I also believe if you are going to use someone's language - use it properly and pronounce it properly (if you can possibly twist your tongue around it -but sometimes I just can't )


When we first went to Europe, we were driving thru France towards Germany. Our destination was a small town, Zweibrucken. It was getting late and Dad was getting lost. Dad spoke both German and French but didn't realize while in France we should have been looking for Deux Pont, tout droit (geradeaus).



I hate when I do that...


Ross
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Old 08-20-2018, 11:44 PM   #7
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"A new study of 2,000 Americans found that over half (56 percent) would even go so far as to consider themselves a “foodie.”


"... and, of course, can cook a quality meal (42 percent)."

https://nypost.com/2018/08/20/most-a...lves-a-foodie/


Where do you fall ??
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Old 08-21-2018, 12:02 AM   #8
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I've always wondered what the "definition" of 'foodie' is.

Anyone care to elaborate? What is your definition...

I've never called myself a 'foodie' as much as I like to cook and as much as I like to eat.
I've never felt I had enough knowledge/experience to do so. ... or even dedication....

I just want to try recipes and produce delicious food to eat...
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:11 AM   #9
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I've always wondered what the "definition" of 'foodie' is.

Anyone care to elaborate? What is your definition...

I've never called myself a 'foodie' as much as I like to cook and as much as I like to eat.
I've never felt I had enough knowledge/experience to do so. ... or even dedication....

I just want to try recipes and produce delicious food to eat...

Exactly..



I don't know a definition but, I generally roll my eyes when someone tells me they are a "foodie".. I often think "food snob"..



Ross
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Old 08-21-2018, 06:39 AM   #10
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Exactly..



I don't know a definition but, I generally roll my eyes when someone tells me they are a "foodie".. I often think "food snob"..



Ross
Exactly! I think we should coin a new word!
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Old 08-21-2018, 07:40 PM   #11
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I don't know a definition but, I generally roll my eyes when someone tells me they are a "foodie".. I often think "food snob"..
If you think "foodie" means food snob, then no, you really don't know the definition.

It's actually the opposite. It means you enjoy learning about food, are an adventurous eater, and open to trying new things. I think of it more as a fun hobby. I've gone on a lot of "Foodie Tours" over the years in various cities. Often they're simply walking tours where you explore city neighborhoods and try local foods and drinks that are produced there. Sometimes it might be nothing more elaborate than a place that serves really good (or unique) chips and salsa. Or it might be a small cafe that has their own take on seafood. But it's far from snobby.

Here is one definition I found:
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Foodies go to new restaurants, shun large chain establishments and are eager to give their opinions and recommendations. Foodies know something about the chefs, cooking styles or methods of these restaurants. They also know about the quality and origin of the food they consume. Foodies are keen to fads, education, and culinary tourism.
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Old 08-21-2018, 08:24 PM   #12
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If you think "foodie" means food snob, then no, you really don't know the definition.

It's actually the opposite. It means you enjoy learning about food, are an adventurous eater, and open to trying new things. I think of it more as a fun hobby. I've gone on a lot of "Foodie Tours" over the years in various cities. Often they're simply walking tours where you explore city neighborhoods and try local foods and drinks that are produced there. Sometimes it might be nothing more elaborate than a place that serves really good (or unique) chips and salsa. Or it might be a small cafe that has their own take on seafood. But it's far from snobby.....
+1, Steve. I used the term 'foodie' in a recent post and it was in no way meant to be a 'snobby' response. I think the term 'foodie' has gotten a bad rap. To me it means pretty much what you posted....loving food, learning, and trying new things.
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Old 08-21-2018, 08:37 PM   #13
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I have to agree. Although "foodies" CAN be food snobs, not all of us are... and yes, I am a foodie. I enjoy a gourmet meal, and a great burger at a hole-in-the-wall joint.

To me, being a foodie just means that food is more than just fuel for the human body. It is something to be enjoyed.

Ross, you are a foodie, whether you want to be, or not.

CD
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Old 08-21-2018, 08:45 PM   #14
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Steve, Cheryl - that all may be very true and I hope for the majority it is. I guess I could call near everyone here that I've interacted with a "foodie" and not mean it in a derogatory manner.

My experience that brought me to think of the term "snob" are the few people whom I've actually met face-to-face who "brag" about all the things you've described Steve. They put on 'airs' about their knowledge.

In other words they were down right annoying.

I think I can honestly say that I've no met anyone like that here.
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Old 08-22-2018, 05:59 AM   #15
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Steve, Cheryl - that all may be very true and I hope for the majority it is. I guess I could call near everyone here that I've interacted with a "foodie" and not mean it in a derogatory manner.

My experience that brought me to think of the term "snob" are the few people whom I've actually met face-to-face who "brag" about all the things you've described Steve. They put on 'airs' about their knowledge.

In other words they were down right annoying.

I think I can honestly say that I've no met anyone like that here.

Steve, Cheryl and CD.... That in bold is where my mind was when I posted.. That and putting down someone else for expressing a view on cooking..


That does happen, even here..


Ross
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Old 08-22-2018, 08:08 AM   #16
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That and putting down someone else for expressing a view on cooking.

Ross
+1 Yup.... forgot that part.
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Old 08-22-2018, 08:26 AM   #17
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I've always wondered what the "definition" of 'foodie' is.

Anyone care to elaborate? What is your definition...

I've never called myself a 'foodie' as much as I like to cook and as much as I like to eat.
I've never felt I had enough knowledge/experience to do so. ... or even dedication....

I just want to try recipes and produce delicious food to eat...
I tend think that "foodie-ness" involves an degree of food snobbishness but not a lot of knowledge. (At least over here it seems that way)
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Old 08-22-2018, 09:04 AM   #18
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If you think "foodie" means food snob, then no, you really don't know the definition.

It's actually the opposite. It means you enjoy learning about food, are an adventurous eater, and open to trying new things. I think of it more as a fun hobby. I've gone on a lot of "Foodie Tours" over the years in various cities. Often they're simply walking tours where you explore city neighborhoods and try local foods and drinks that are produced there. Sometimes it might be nothing more elaborate than a place that serves really good (or unique) chips and salsa. Or it might be a small cafe that has their own take on seafood. But it's far from snobby.

Here is one definition I found:
"It means you enjoy learning about food, are an adventurous eater, and open to trying new things" Well! Those criteria apply to me but I would be mortally offended if anyone referred to me as a "Foodie"!!!

Generally, a "Foodie" is a know-it-all who couldn't find the handle on a frying pan. A "Foodie" follows food fashion slavishly because it's fashionable, not because s/he (usually "he" in my experience) actually likes its taste.

I have a cousin who is a chef, trained in the Royal Navy (and you don't get a better training than that). He has been responsible for banquets for one of your Presidents and a couple of our Prime Ministers whilst he was in the navy and now runs the kitchen in a British Embassy organising and supervising the cooking for the most important events! Food, and the cooking of it, is his passion but he is NOT a "Foodie".











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Old 08-22-2018, 09:10 AM   #19
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I tend think that "foodie-ness" involves an degree of food snobbishness but not a lot of knowledge. (At least over here it seems that way)
Sorry, just re-read that - I meant "...over here in UK", not "..over here on DC"
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Old 08-23-2018, 04:25 AM   #20
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"It means you enjoy learning about food, are an adventurous eater, and open to trying new things" Well! Those criteria apply to me but I would be mortally offended if anyone referred to me as a "Foodie"!!!

Generally, a "Foodie" is a know-it-all who couldn't find the handle on a frying pan. A "Foodie" follows food fashion slavishly because it's fashionable, not because s/he (usually "he" in my experience) actually likes its taste.

I have a cousin who is a chef, trained in the Royal Navy (and you don't get a better training than that). He has been responsible for banquets for one of your Presidents and a couple of our Prime Ministers whilst he was in the navy and now runs the kitchen in a British Embassy organising and supervising the cooking for the most important events! Food, and the cooking of it, is his passion but he is NOT a "Foodie".

You're right. You are definitely not a foodie. Compared to us mere commoners, you sound far too superior to wear that label.
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