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Old 02-27-2006, 09:13 PM   #21
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You can fill it with lots of stuff. Sauerkraut, cottage cheese, sweet fillings (apple pie stuff, cherry pie stuff, etc) you get the idea. OR...you can just cut it into pieces, boil them and serve them with lots of butter, bacon and sour cream. MMMMMMMMMMMMMMM!
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Old 02-27-2006, 09:19 PM   #22
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Yummm....cherry pie filling...and drizzle a frosting over it...
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Old 02-28-2006, 05:30 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
No-no-no, it is Ukrainian pierogies (that are, by the way, called Vareniki)
Ah... Vareniki... I have heard of them, just didn't put two and two together!!


Angie, sweet filling will be great... we do the same thing with crepes, when there are extra crepes left after making our dinner crepes, we just throw in jams, whipped cream etc and make desserts out of them, and out...
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Old 02-28-2006, 09:17 AM   #24
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Looks like Pirogy comes from Polish. Everybody I talked to think that it wasn't used in Ukraine. Though I did not talk to anybody from Western Ukraine, that borders Poland, so it could be that they also use that term.
Alix, do you know where your Grandma was from?
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Old 02-28-2006, 10:07 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD
Looks like Pirogy comes from Polish. Everybody I talked to think that it wasn't used in Ukraine. Though I did not talk to anybody from Western Ukraine, that borders Poland, so it could be that they also use that term.
Alix, do you know where your Grandma was from?
It is probably the same thing as Baklava (among many other delicacies from that region), it could be called Greek, just as well it could be also Turkish. They are geographically so close certain aspects of culinary tradition sort of mingle together.
Well... at the end of the day the most important thing is that they are good stuff...
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Old 02-28-2006, 10:51 AM   #26
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this was on food network the other day... and I never made it.. but I will soon. It looks VERY easy and delicious - just ignore the caesar salad part.

Pyrogies and Caesar Salad

EDIT NOTE: This recipe is on the FoodNetwork CANADA website
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Old 02-28-2006, 11:36 AM   #27
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Everything in this thread has looked great, except for one thing, true authentic pierogi dough would use a solid fat like butter or preferably lard. That being said, when we get together at Christmas to make them, we use oil.

(And a VERY similar recipe to Alix's - we use an egg AND a cup of water though)

As for the leftover dough, we never have that problem, my cousins just start looking for other things to use as fillings when there's dough left. Tomatos, jelly from the fridge, it really does get quite ugly sometimes... (probably has to do with all the beer and vodka)

We always make sure we don't bring any of the "special" pierogi home. My personal favorite is the mashed potato and cheese. My dad likes the kraut filled ones. Nobody on our side tends to care for the cheese filled.

John
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Old 03-03-2006, 12:12 PM   #28
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well, yesterday I made the recipe from the food network, and it was the first time I made them.... and they tasted really good.. but did not look all brown like that picture.. after I boiled them.. they were kinda soggy.. and I had to be VERY careful when I put them back into the pan with the onions or they would fall apart, so they were soft... ok guys so whats the secret so they are not like that. They were delicious and the dough was great, but I would like to have a better presentation... any hints???
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Old 03-03-2006, 12:21 PM   #29
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Well, I can't speak for the recipe you used as the dough looks like it would be a bit softer than the one I use...BUT...as a general rule you scoop them out as soon as they start to float. When they float, they're done. Would that help you think?

Ronjohn, LMAO at the vodka and beer bit. I can soooooo relate to that. We never have extra dough either, but that is because we just make smaller and smaller perohe til its used up and then toss in the bits to boil with everything else.

AND...as to the oil vs butter or lard, very true! My Babby (gramma) used to use melted butter in hot water and let it cool a bit before using. Got to be careful with that egg thing though! I just use oil because it is faster and easier. Dang I'm lazy!
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Old 03-03-2006, 03:17 PM   #30
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well, recipe said to boil them 4 minutes.. do you think that is to much?
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Old 03-03-2006, 03:54 PM   #31
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Yep. Mine float way sooner than that. You really have to have the water at a full rolling boil the whole time too.
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Old 03-03-2006, 03:56 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alix
Yep. Mine float way sooner than that. You really have to have the water at a full rolling boil the whole time too.
ok kewl.. I still have some in the freezer.. I will try that then

thank you Alix

weeeeeeeeeeeeee
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Old 03-03-2006, 04:40 PM   #33
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My pleasure. Let me know if you ever use my dough recipe and tell me how it stacked up with the other one. I'm always open to feedback.
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Old 03-04-2006, 11:30 AM   #34
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Alix, I've never made piroghi, but your dough sounds exactly like the one I use for my rolled dumplings, minus the oil. Once, when I was making a huge batch of chicken and dumplings for company, I ended up with more dough than I needed. I had left-over filling from making cheese-stuffed shells in the freezer, so I used that to make ravioli, which I boiled and sauced in the usual way, and it was quite a good dish. Now you've given me the confidence to try the piroghi.
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Old 03-04-2006, 12:41 PM   #35
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Constance, I hope you do, it really is very easy. Time consuming, but easy. I suggest to folks that you make a BIG batch and invite some friends over for a perohe making party and everyone goes home with a bag of them. Much fun!

The recipe is pretty similar to dumplings and one of the pasta recipes I have. Its very versatile and tastes soooooo good.

Let me know how they work out for you!
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Old 04-03-2006, 12:56 PM   #36
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made them yesterday

I love perogies, so does my family, I used to get them shipped into
Kansas City from Chicago, there is no good polish food here.

This time I decided to make them myself actually my daughters helped.

I made them with a meat filling I cooked a pork tenderlion with onions
mushrooms, saurkraut with some of the juice and apple juice overnight
in a low heat crockpot. Then shredded and chopped the meat finely.

Boiled them and then fried in butter with onions until brown.

My kids loved them and asked to take more out of the freezer so
they could take them to school for lunch, so I did and my husband
ate them all. I will need to make again. Meat perogies are the best
I have had many flavors, my mother inlaw is polish and has turned my
family on to these wonderful treats. Well worth the home made efforts
frozen ones really don't cut it.
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Old 04-03-2006, 02:10 PM   #37
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I used to be the chef at a Eastern European cafe quite a few years back. It was just myself and 2 others, and I couldn't keep up unless I spent my off day making Pierogies for about 10 hours!!!
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Old 04-04-2006, 03:25 AM   #38
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Pierogies

I spent a little over a year living in Krakow, Poland recently and had the pleasure of eating authentic pierogies a number of times. While I cant say I ever succeeded in making my own (they fell apart, or were too doughy, and I eventually gave up as they are incredibly cheap and tasty to just buy). However, I can offer some observations.

First, while the traditional way of cooking pierogies is to simply boil them, many times I encountered a fried version that were also very tasty and a harder texture. Also, whether fried or boiled, they are always served with little pieces of fried lard (fried onions are sometimes substituted, but not as common). While sauces are also not traditional, I encountered at more "hip" pierogi places a variety of simple cream sauces. Some people use soy sauce as well (personally, I think soy sauce is fantastic with pierogies).

Probably the most traditional Polish pierogi is the Pierogi Ruskie (Russian pierogi), which is filled with mashed potatoes and a type of cream/cottage cheese. Also common are the Pierogi z ziemniakami i Grzybami (mashed potatoes and mushrooms) and Pierogi miesny (pierogi with ground beef). While I have, again, found a number of variations (ground lamb, chicken, turkey, spinach, etc) these are by far the most common. Serve with a warm beetroot soup and follow up with a shot of Zybrowka (vodka with a blade of bison grass in the bottle) and you have yourself a traditional polish meal.

Smacznego! (bon appetit!)
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Old 04-04-2006, 03:35 AM   #39
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Pierogi Scrap Dough

Also, there is a Scrap Dough thread with a bunch of ideas for your remaining dough pieces:

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...eas-19725.html
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Old 04-04-2006, 06:51 AM   #40
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Pierogies

One last thing to add:

When making pierogies, since the process of rolling, stuffing, securing the dough takes a lot of time, it is best to make a whole bunch at once (enlist the help of others) and freeze the remainders. They freeze well and they make a really quick meal later on (no defrost necessary, just throw into salted, boiling water).
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